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AXIOM 

GP550AT (Atari) 239 

GP550CD C-64 239 

GP550PC (IBM) 229 

GP550AP (Apple) 269 

GP700AT (Afan) 439 

GP700AP Apple) 439 

ELITE5CD (C-B4) 229 

GPIOOAT (Alan) CALL 

C. ITOH 

PROWRITER 8510AP 279 
8510AP+ 299 

8510BPI . . .309 

8510SP 375 

8510SR 425 

8510SCP 449 

8510SCR 469 

7500AP 205 

7500AR 245 

1550P 439 

1550AP+ 459 

1550BCP 469 

A10-30P 445 

F10-40P or S 359 

F10-55P or S 1039 

FIO Tractor 159 

FIO Sheet Feeder 249 



CARDCO 

32K BUFFER (C-64) 59 



CITIZEN 



MSP-10 
MSP-15 
MSP-20 
MSP-25 
Sheetldr 
Stieelldr 



10/20) 
15/25) 



289 

449 
449 
569 
.189 
199 



JUKI 

Juki 6100 ... 
RS232 Serial Board 
6100 Tractor 
6100 Street Feeder 
Juki 5300 



LEGEND 



OKIDATA 



CORONA 

LP300 Laser Printer 2699 

200361 Toner Cartridge .89 



EPSON 

LX80 (NEW) 
FX80 + 
FX100 + 
JX80 Color 
RX100 

HOIvlEWRITER 10 (New) 
CR220 (C-64) 

LQ1500 Par 

LQ1500 Ser... 
HI80 Color Plotter 



Okimate 10 
Okimale 20 
182 
192 

193 

92P 

93P 

84P 

92 imagewnter 

"IBM versions also 



375 
. 55 
119 
209 
.765 



CALL 
CALL 
215 
.349 
.565 
.349 
565 
645 
349 



1080 
1380 
1385 



199 

.225 

265 

299 




DIGITAL DEVICES 



16K BUFFER 
32K BUFFER 
64K BUFFER 



PiJ-tO 
P351 



TOSHIBA 
MICROBITS 



75 
.89 
125 



559 
1289 



r\/licrostufter 



225 

349 
479 
489 
369 
CALL 
159 
999 
1059 
379 



BROTHER 

HR-15XL-P 
HR-15XL-S 
HR-35P 

HR-35S 

2024L-P 

M1009-P 



DIABLO 



PANASONIC 

1091 239 

1090 185 

1092 375 

1093 429 

3151 Letter 429 

4K Butter 65 



SILVER REED 

EXP400 249 

EXP500 295 

EXP550 409 

EXP770 749 



STAR MICRONICS 

SG-10 215 



359 
359 
839 
839 
949 
189 



D25 

630API 

630ECS 

D801F 

P32CQ1 

P3B 

C160 



549 
1599 
1759 
2395 

699 
1749 

999 



SG 



SD 
SD 
SR 
SR 



15 



-10 

-15 

■10 

-15 
Powerlype 
SB-10 
SG-lOC-64 (NEW) 



375 
.339 
445 
.485 
585 
305 
CALL 
CALL 



MONITORS 



115 12 

116 12 

121 12' 

122 12' 
220 H 
410 12 
420 12 
440 12 



Till Stand 



TAXAN 

Green Composite 
Amber Composiie 
Green TTL 
Amber TTL 
Color Composiie 
RGB Hi Res IBM 
RGB Super Hi IBIvI 
RGB Ultra Hi Res 



SAKATA 



CALL 
CALt 
135 
145 
25e 
329 
409 
569 
35 



SGlOOO 12 ■ Green 


99 


SAIOOO 12 Amber 


109 


SG1500 12 Green TTL 


1 19 


SAIdOO 12 Amber TTL 


129 


SClOO 13 Color Comp 


2U9 


SC200 13 RGB 


389 


STSI Tilt Stand 


29 



NEC 

JB-1260 Green 
JB-12D1 Green 
JC 1215 Color 
JC 1216 RGB 
JC1460 Color 
JB-1205 Amber 



95 
135 
235 
.375 
265 
139 



PANASONIC 

1300 RGl composite 



PRINCETON GRAPHICS 

MAX-12 Amber 189 

HX-12 RGB 475 

SR-12 RGB 599 



ZENITH 

ZVM 122A Amber 84 

ZVIvl 123G Green 75 

ZVM 124 Amber IBM . 129 

ZVM 131 Color 275 

ZVM 133 RGB 389 

ZVM 135 Composite 449 

ZVM 136 Hi Res Color 589 

X-TRON 

Comcolor 1 ConipoMtc (jrcL-n. 185 



AMDEK 

300 Green 125 

300 Amber 139 

310 Amber IBM 155 

Color 300 Audio 245 

Color 500 Composite 369 

Color 600 429 

Color 700 495 

Colci- 710 569 



MODEMS 



DRIVES 



PRINTER INTERFACE 



DISKETTES 



HAYES 

SMARTMODEM 300 139 

SMARTMODEM 1200 379 

SMARTMODEM 1200B....349 

SMARTMODEM 2400 599 

MICROMODEM HE 135 

ANCHOR 

Volksmodem 55 

Volksmodem 12 186 

Mark 12 229 

MICROBITS 

MPP100E (ATARI) 75 



INDUS 
Atari 

215 



AXIOM 

AT846 (Atari) 65 

ATARI 

850 Interface 109 

DIGITAL DEVICES 

AoeFace XLP (Atari) 49 

U-Print A (Atari) 54 

U-CALL RS232 (Atari) 37 

CARDCO 

C/?AT (Atari) 49 



SKC (Box 10) 






iQly 1 10 


100 


500 


5'; SSDD 13 75 


12 99 


11 99 


5'. DSDD 15 75 


14 99 


14 25 


ELEPHANT (Box 1 


0) 




y.: SSSD 13 50 


12 99 


11 99 


5' J SSDD '"99 


13 99 


12 99 


5'. DSDD 16 99 


15 99 


14 99 


Premium SSDD 15 95 


14 95 


13 95 


Premium DSDD 17 95 


16 95 


15 95 


MAXELL (Box 10) 






5'4 MD-1 16 75 


15 75 


14 75 


5'i MD-2 22 99 


21 99 


20 99 



ATARI SOFTWARE 



ATARI 

aOOXL CALL 

130XE (NEW) CALL 

520ST (NEW CALL 

1050 Drive 165 

1010 Recorder 42 

1020 Printer 55 

1025 Printer 159 

1027 Printer 179 

850 Interface 109 



ATARI SOFTWARE (NEW) 

Codewriter....' 35.75 

Filewriter 20.75 

Reportwriter 20.75 

Menuwriter 20.75 

Home Integrator 19.75 

Small Bus. Inventory 11.75 

Salesman Expenses 11.75 

Aces Rec/Pay 1 1.75 

Retail Invoice 11.75 

Final Legacy 15.75 

Adventure Writer 18.75 

Star Voyager 1 1.75 



MICROPROSE (Atari) 

Kennedy Approach 21.75 

Crusade in Europe 24.75 

Decision in Desert 24.75 

Solo Flight 20.75 

Nato Commander 20.75 

Spitfire Ace 18.75 

F-15 Strike Eagle 20.75 

Hellcat Ace 18.75 

SUB LOGIC (Atari) 

Flight Simulator II. ...32.75 

NigTit Mission Pinball 20.75 



BRODERBUND (Atari) 

The Print Shop 28.95 

Graphics Library 18.95 

Graphics Library II 19.50 

Bank St. Writer 42.75 

Whistler's Brother 18.95 

Spelunker 18.95 

Stealth 18.95 

Serpent's Star 24.95 

Mask of the Sun 24.95 



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A WORD PROCESSING PROGRAM \ 
AN INFORMATION MANAGEMENT PROGRAM] 

A TELECOMMUNICATIONS PROGRAM! 

ALL THREE PROGRAMS, ON ONE DISKETTE!, FOR ONLY $49.95 *! 

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"Performance: ir • • -k (Excellent) Value. ■ ir • • it (Excellent) 
This three-in-one package is a bargain . . . one of the finest values on the market. " 



FAMILY COMPUTING 



HOMETEXT word processor. 

HOMEFIND INFORMATION MANAGER. 

HOMETERM telecommunications 

Together they are liomePak: the three most 
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The reviewers are unanimous: any one of 

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So you're getting three times the computing power, 

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• all commands in simple English; no complex 
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all key commands are immediately available on 
the screen menu; additional commands can be 
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to help you, system status is displayed right 
on the screen 
And it's easy to use the three programs together. For 
example, in the "Merge" mode, you can take data 
stored in HOMEFIND and print letters and labels 
using HOMETEXT. Or, use HOMETEXT to write 
reports based on information you've called up 
via HOMETERM. 




HomeText 



3in1 

Software System 



Processing prog,™^'^ 



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BATTERIES ^^ INCLUDED 



T 7875 Sky Park North, Suite P 
Irving, California 

"The Energized Software Company!" M^eifaf-lllt 

WRITE TO US FOR FULL COLOUR CATALOGUE of our products for COMMODORE, ATARI, APPLE and IBM SYSTEMS Tfe/ex: 509-139 

FOR TECHNICAL SUPPORT OR PRODUCT INFORMATION PLEASE PHONE lA 161 S8)-9S)6 



1986 BATTERIES INCLUDED APPLE. ATARL COMMODORE AND IBM ARE REGISIERED TRADC-MAHRS RESPECTIVELY OP APPLE COMPUTERS INC , ATARI INC . COMMODORE 

BUSINESS MACHINES INC , AND lOM BUSINESS MACHINES INC 



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Choose your 
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Explore and conquer 
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FEATURES: Joystick-driven; no commands to learn! Private mail, bulletin boards, program library, file 
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surcharge. SYSTEM REQUIREMENTS: 48K Atari, 1 disk drive, modem. 

For more information contact: 



GAMES 
COMPUTERS 
PLAY, INC. 

112 East Market Street, York, PA 17401/717-848-2660 



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The ATARI Resource October 1985, volume 4, number 6 



524 megabytes 14 




1st ST program listing 20 




FEATURES 1 


BANJO PICKER by Richard Lindsren 
Play bluegrass music like a bionic Earl Scruggs! 


TYPE-IN SOFTWARE 


28 


SEE HALLEY'S COMET ON YOUR ATARI 

New software super-maps 


by Gigi Bisson 


36 


A STUDENT TESTS S,AX SOFTWARE by 

Grades for Krell and HBJ 


Dianna Harms 


40 


YOGA BREATHING by ten Dorfman & Jerry White 

your Guru, the Atari type-in software 


44 


GRAPH 3D by Paul Chabot 
Spectacular three-dimensional visuals! 


TYPE-IN SOFTWARE 


46 




ST SECT ON 


BOOKSHELF ON A LASER DISK 

by Nat Friedland 

ST searches 540 megabytes in 3 seconds 




14 


GEM COLOR CASCADE by Patrick Bass 
How to convert an 8-bit Atari program for the ST 


TYPE-IN SOFTWARE 


20 


FIRST ST PERFORMANCE TEST by Patrick Bass 

Mac eats the ST's dust! 


24 


ST PRODUCT NEWS by Jack Powell 

First ST book review 




26 




SOFT WA RE L B R 


A R y 




TYPE-IN LISTINGS SECTION 




51 




Idepartments 


COMMUNICATIONS 

GAMES COMPUTERS PLAY by Eric Clausen 
New online service featuring superb graphics 




8 


GAME OF THE MONTH 

ALIEN ASYLUM by spencer Craske 
Win sanity points or else! 


TYPE-IN SOFTWARE 


31 


BONUS GAME 

LEMONADE by Bob Polaro 
APX hit educational game! 


TYPE-IN SOFTWARE 


32 


ASSEMBLY LANGUAGE 

FINE SCROLLING WORLD: PART II by Mark Andrews 
Dot-by-dot screen moves, 8 times smoother! type-in software 


72 



I/O BOARD. 
HELP 



ANTIC ONLINE. 



Graph 3D 46 ADVERTISERS LIST. 



6 


PRODUCT REVIEWS 


76 


7 


SHOPPERS GUIDE 


80 


7 


NFW PRODUCTS 


82 


74 


ANTIC ARCADE CATALOG 


AC1 




Publisher 
James Capparcll 
Editorial 
Nat Friedland, Editor; Jack Powell. Technical 
liditor; Charles Jackson, Prognini Kditor; 
Patrick Bass. ST Prognim Editor; Gig! Bisson, 
Assistant Editor; Rebecca Hale, Editorial 
Coordinator; Ron I.uks, On-[,ine Editor. 

Contributing Editors 
Carl Evans, Ken Harms, Jerry White, Suzi 
Subeck, Anita Malnig. 

Art 
Marni Tapscott. Art Director; Diane Lindley, 
Production Supervisor; Linda Tapscott, Ad 
Production Coordinator; Julianne Ososke, 
Production Assistant. 

Cover Illustration 
Alan Okamoto 
Circulation 
Les Torok, Circulation Manager; Hun-sik Kim, 
Shipping; Monica Burrcll, Subscriptions; Eve 
Gowdey, Dealer Sales; Brandt/Klingel, 
Circulation Consultants. 

Accounting 
V.J. Briggs, Accounting Manager; Brenda 
Oliver, Accounts Receivable; I^orene Kaatz, 
Credit Manager; Andrew Pope, Customer 
Service, Retailers; Nelly Rodriguez, Data 
Processing. 

Marketing 
Gary Yost, Director, Marketing; Brad Ker- 
shaw, Product Specialist; Lisa Wehrer, Cus- 
tomer Relations. 

Advertising 
Steve Randall, Advertising Director; Harvey 
Bernstein, Sales; Garland & Associates, East 
Coast Representatives. 

Maria E. Chavez, Receptionist 
Fidez Bituin, Clerical 

General Offices 

€' Catalog Customer Service 

(415) 95'^-0886 

Suhscriptioti Customer Service 

(6N) 383-3141 

Atitic, P.O. Box 1919. Marion. OH 43306 

Advertising Sales (415) 661-3400 

Garland & Associates (617) 749-5852 

Credit Card Subscriptions & Catalog Orders 

outside California (800) 227-1617 ext. 133 

i/jside California (800) -^72-3545 ext. 133 

October 1985, Volume 4, Number 6 
Antic— The Atari Resource is published twelve times 
per year by Antic Publishing. Kditorial offices are 
located at 524 Second Street, San Francisco, CA 
9-4 107. ISSN 0745-2527. Second CI:lss Postage paid at 
San Francisco, California and additional mailing 
offices. POSTMASTER: Send address change to Antic, 
PC. Box 1919. Marion. OH 43306. 
Editorial submissions should include program listing 
on disk or cassette, and text file on media and paper 
if text was prepared with a word processor. Media 
will be returned if self-addressed stamped mailer is 
supplied. Antic assumes no responsibility for un- 
solicited editorial material. 

No part of this publication nvjy be repnxluced, stored 
in a retrieval system, or transmitted, in any form or 
by any means, electronic, mechanical, photocopying, 
recording, or otiicrwise, without the prior written 
permission of the publisher. 

Antic is an independent periodical not affiliated in 
any way with Atari Corp. ATARI isatnutemark of Atari 
Corp. All references to Atari products ;u-e trademarked 
anti should lie so noted. 

Antic is a registered trademark 

of Antic Publishing, Inc, 

Cop)right ©1985 by Antic Publishing. 

All itiiilns Re.servcd. Printed in USA. 



^^^^ i/o bodrd 




1027 INK ROLLERS 



I'm having a very hard time finding the 
printer inlc rollers for my Atari 1027 
printer. No retail shops here in the Florida 
Panliandle carry these. Could you help 
me? 

Bruce Daniel 
Niceville, FL 
The friendly folks at Atari Customer Ser- 
vice assured us that they have a plentiful 
supply of these, although they are not 
common around the country. They can 
be ordered directly from Customer Ser- 
vice for S3 -98 each. 
Atari Customer Service 
1196 Borregas Avenue 
Sunnyvale, CA 94086 



kyan QUERY 



I've heard of a kyan Pascal package for 
S69.95- Can you tell me something about 
it before I invest? 

Robert Stadler 

Look for a review of kyan Pascal in these 
pages next month.— AHVC ED 



130XE TIPS 



Has anybody noticed diat on a 130XE, one 
does not need to press [SHIFT] along with 
[CAPS] to enter upper-case letter mode? 
Also, for some reason typing RUN in in- 
verse video works (but not RUN "D.). 
Frank Imburgio 
Setauket, NY 

ACCURATE ATARIWRITER 

Can you give me some information on a 
spelling checker program that will work 
with AtariWriter? 

Tony M. Han 
Oak Grove, MO 

The Antic Arcade Catalog has one pro- 
gram. Spell Magic, which will work with 
AtariWriter Also, this year Atari will be 
bringing out an improved version of 
AtariWriter called AtariWriter Plus. This 



will have a built-in spelling checker as 
well a mailmerge function. And it luill 
also contain three 15K switchable file 
banks that can be fully utilized on the 
130XE computer. -M\1\C ED 

PRINT SHOP LINKS 

1 have found Print Shop to be a superb pro- 
gram except for one small item. It pro- 
duces striped printouts on my BMC BX-80 
when I use it with their BMC or Epson 
printer setups. 

However, when I use the Mannesmann 

Tally Spirit 80 setup my printouts are 

perfect. I thought you might want to pass 

this information on to other Atari owners. 

Bob Whipple 

Clementon, NJ 

You may want to pass this information on 
to your readers who own Star Gemini lOX 
printers and are contemplating acquiring 
Print Shop. 

The software performs flawlessly, with 
the exception of printing banners. The 
result is not as described. Instead you get 
a checkerboard pattern, rather than solid 
lines as with greeting cards, letterheads 
and signs. This was confirmed by Broder- 
bund in a letter they sent me. 

Hisham M. Saaid 
Frankfort, KY 

PARTS YOU NEED 

I have enjoyed your magazine very much 
for the last three years. I never en- 
countered a problem worth writing in 
about before, but I have one now. Where 
do I get the cable for the Atari 600XL that 
connects the computer to the TV switch- 
box? Mine has broken, and I can't find 
another 

K. Kidwell 
We spoke to Atari Customer Service. Atari 
now prefers to repair cables that have 
broken, rather than selling new ones 
Take the broken cable into an Atari Ser- 
vice Center Or send it to Atari Customer 
Service, they will fix it for you and return 
it COD. 



ANTIC, The Atari Resource 




antic online 




SPrNNAKER SUPPORT 

Spinnaker Software would like all readers 
of Antic Magazine to know that it intends 
to fully support the new Atari ST comput- 
ers. Spinnaker was the first major pub- 
lisher to announce support for the ST, and 
we intend to support the machine across 
each of our brands; Spinnaker, Fisher- 
Price, Telarium, Windham Classics and 
Better Working. 

It takes time to convert software to a 
new computer, especially when it has such 
wonderful new features. We will have the 
first of our products available in 
September, and should have 10 different 
titles available for Christmas. 

Spinnaker has been a long supporter of 
At;iri Computer products, and we intend 
to remain so in the future. 

William H. Bowman 
Chairman 
Spinnaker Software 



Type GO ANTIC when you log onto 
CompuServe in September. On 
ANTIC ONLINE you'll always find the 
latest news about the bonanza of 
sophisticated software coming soon 
for Atari ST computers. 



^m\ 




l4/orldwide' 
1^— Users 
^^\ /Vetwork 



WUN BOARD NEWS 

Members of Atari users groups af- 
filiated with the Worldwide Users 
Network will want to see the covei:age 
of the first WUN Board of Directors 
Meeting. The WUN grassroots move- 
ment should have some exciting 
developments for members this 
autumn. 

Featured this month on ANTIC 
ONLINE is the complete eight-lesson 
course in Assembly Language by 
famed game designer Chris Crawford. 



You'll find all eight lessons in the 
Worldwide Users Network pages. 

And don't forget that a complete 
Antic Arcade Catalog customer ser- 
vice system is now available on 
ANTIC ONLINE. Follow the Antic 
Central Menu Prompts to upload your 
queries for quick email response. 

SIGNING UP 

If you're not a CompuServe subscriber 
yet, see your local computer dealer or 
phone (800) 848-8199 for informa- 
tion about signing up. Ohio residents 
phone (614) 457-0802. There is no 
extra charge for accessing ANTIC 
ONLINE. 

Now ANTIC ONLINE (and SIG * 
Atari) are also available on the Delphi 
service at a saving of S6 per hour for 
1200 baud access. Phone (800) 544- 
4005 for information about signing 
up with Delphi. Massachusetts 
residents phone (617) 491-3393. Q 



help! 



ATARI 'TOONS 



The 22nd data character in line 1090 of 
Listing 2 in Atari 'Toons (August, 1985) is 
an A. The A got smudged during final 
printing. Because this will undoubtedly 
throw off many contestants, the Atari 
'Toons contest deadline is being extending 
by one month. 

Also, 'Toons will only load standard size 
character sets. To fix this, change NUM- 
BER =1024, in line 1140 to, NUMBER = 
2050. And change line 1150 to; 1150 
GOTO 1170. 

November 1, 1985 is the new deadline 
for entries to arrive at Antic. First prize 
in the Atari 'Toons contest is a 1200 baud 
modem. 



STAR VENTURE 



has difficulty restarting. Change line 380 
to the following: 

388 IF PEEKC53279) =6 TH 
EN SOUND e,8.8,8:G0T0 8 


MUSICIAN 

If you're having problems with tempo 
changes in Musician (Antic, June, 1985) 
remove line 1720 and add the following 
line; 

1715 IF n=14 THEN TEMPO 
=-e . 25 : GOTO 1708 
1728 REM REMOVE T 
HIS LINE 



TYPO II MATH WIZ 



you'll find the TYPO II line codes for Math 
Wizard, a Matthew Ratcliff educational 
game that Antic published in April, 1984. 
The July, 1985 Antic also provided 
TYPO 11 correction codes— for all three 
popular 1984 games by J.D. Casten plus 
Adventure Island (November, 1984). 

CUSTOM PRINT 

When you use a redefined character set. 
Custom Print (March, 1985) has trouble 
printing certain characters — such as !, *, 
$, and so on. To correct this, change line 
5 to; 

5 CS=PEEKC186J -8 : 
POKE 186.CS-l:GRfl 
PHIC5 8:DXM CSTSC 
28J : CSTS = "" 



Our July, 1985 bonus game. Star Venture, This issue, in the Software Library pages. 



a 



October 1985 



♦ ^ ♦ 



communications 



HCLCUHE 


Ta 


CAHES CnXPUTeRS 


PLftV 


InC 1 


HHKURUBE = 


M^ 


JajpiiiiciTViil 


^^ 


isiii| 




=== 


:^B^^='===Hi^l^=: 


■ - 1 



GAMES 

COMPUTERS 
PLAY 




CyberTank Combat 



Superb 
color graphics 
online 

by ERIC CLAUSEN 

You log onto Games Computers 
Play and suddenly you're in a 
wonderland of boldly geometric col- 
or graphics, with perspectives that 
come at you from startling angles. 

The whole scene could have been 
designed by M.C. Escher. Or you 
might be in a vast game of Realm Of 
Impossibility, the Electronic Arts 
update of the earlier classic Zomibies. 
Except you're online and your Atari's 
playmate is a powerful 300-megabyte 
minicomputer based in York, 
Pennsylvania. 

Games Computers Play (GCP) is a 
unique new commercial online ser- 
vice that features state-of-the-art col- 
or graphics and easy icon control by 
joystick. GCP also offers exciting 
interactive games, real-time confer- 
encing, electronic mail and public do- 
main downloads. 




W a 1 

J 1 

1 1 

POIMTS : 82 

space :a3 



HflRK 4 
ITEM 



TUBBET 
SC . UEAPaH5 



B" a 

i^ a 

-^ S 

ItEH 
DHiniDT 



'^'•'=— -' 



aPTXIHi=01EET 
5EI.ECT=SBIP 

STa«T=sai« 



Online since January 1985, GCP is 
just for Atari computers with 48K 
memory, disk drive and modem. Cur- 
rently supported are Hayes Smart- 
Modems and compatibles, plus the 
Atari 1030 and 835 modems. MPP 
support may come in the future. 

GCP costs only $6 an hour from 6 
pm to 7 am and throughout the 
weekend. Weekday "prime time" is 
$15 an hour. A one-time 130 signup 
fee gives you five free hours online, 
so in effect it costs you nothing extra. 

There's no extra charge for 1200 
baud, in fact it's highly recommended 
because of the large amount of data 
needing to be transferred for updating 
the graphics screens. 

GCP subscribers get a total of three 
disks, which support the online 
graphics cues for different areas of the 
system. This approach is one of those 



Cybership Design 

brilliantly simple ideas that you 
wonder why nobody ever thought of 
before. 

User friendliness is the hallmark of 
GCP. Keyboard commands are simple 
and kept down to a minimum. You'll 
control most of what you do online 
simply by moving your "droid" icon 
with a joystick. 

Even the process of logging on is 
totally automated if your modem sup- 
ports autodialing. It's very simple to 
configure the GCP boot disk for your 
modem, and then you're ready to go 
online. 

ENTERING GAMEWORLD 

As you log on, an ornate set of doors 
bearing the GCP logo slides open. You 
are in the Customs Office where you 

Continue on page 10 



ANTIC, The Atari Resource 



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GAMES 

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UTILITIES 

Another 
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Another 

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#16 MUSIC MAJORI 

You can learn the basics of music with this 
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# 17 MICRO-TALES 

Written for the 4th or 5th grade levels, but 
children of ALL AGES will enjoy the action, 
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SUPER STUD POKER 

by Walt Huber 
Now you can play hand after 
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ten computer opponents of 
varying skills to choose from and 
YOU CAN PLAY EIGHT POPULAR 
STUD POKER GAMES, including 
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and Hi Chicago. A wild card can 
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care for a friendly game of Poker? 
Joystick required. 
$29.95 value >i|cw! Only $12.95 



ORIGINAL ADVENTURE 

by Bob Howell 
For all Atari computers. The Original 
Colossal Cave Adventure faithfully 
reproduced from the 'main-frames' 
This is the one that launched the 
whole Adventure craze of loday]_ 

* Two mazes 

* 130 rooms 

■ Deadly Dragons 

■ Nasty Dwarves 

■ Tenacious Troll 

* The Pirate & More! 
' 86 coded hints 
•SAVE/RESUME 

■ 40k disk 
Originally $29.95 Only $14.95 




INSTEDIT 

The Atari Program Exchange (APX) called this "the 
best Character set editor we've seen". And no 
wonder! You can create special math and chemistry 
symbols, foreign language alphabets, or special 
typefaces. By positioning several characters 
together, you can even create hi-res pictures! 
Advanced users familiar with player missile 
graphics can even use it to design players. From 
beginner to expert, this is for you. Complete with a 
20 page manual. Joystick required. 

24.95 value LotMByte* price $1 2.95 



New ! STAR LORDS by Walt Huber 
Until the 24th Century man was confined to Earth, the solar system 
and a few nearby stars. Portals were predicted and soon discovered, 
allowing exploration of the Galaxy. Colonization proceeded rapidly, 
differences arose, wars were fought, and soon the Galaxy was on the 
eve of destruction. Peace came in the 27th Century. Disputes were 
decided by specially trained STAR LORDS commanding unmanned 
ships and robot satellites duelling in the far reaches of Space. 
Ultimate victory meant complete control of the Gaiaxyl You have just 
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$39.95 value LolxBytn prica $14.95 



ESI WRITER! 

A quality WORD PROCESSOR that out-performs others 
costing over $100. It works with almost any printer and is 
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Numbering, Headers, Centering and much more! It can 
load in other WP files, has friendly messages, and comes 
with over 50 pages of documentation and tutorials. Works 
with any Atari, but some configurations will require a 
translator disk. No printer drivers are required and you can 
use every feature of your printer. Disk only. 

Originally $49.95 LotuBylst price $19.95 



STONEQUEST by David Stralitz 
King Weesey and his subjects lived in 
great prosperity until the Evil 
Alchemist stole the GREAT STONE OF 
PROSPERITY and transported it to his 
Biack Fortress. Unless someone 
.{you?) takes up the Quest and 
irecovers the STONE, King Weesey and 
'his subjects are doomed . . . You've 
come to the Castle to try to help, but it 
won't be easy. There are many traps, 
pitfalls, and puzzles to solve on the 
way. Almost everyone you meet will be 
an enemy and mustbeout-smarted (or 
bribed?). Magic Is everywhere and in 
many forms. Will you be strong 
enought to survive? (Text) 

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BACK BY POPULAR DEMANDI THE ULTIMATE PROGRAMMING UTILITIES! 

Tricky TutorlaliTM ai LOW at $ 7.95 each 

TRICKY TUTORIALSTM originally sold for up to $29.95 per copy. 
Each is written in an entertaining style and comes complete with disk and manual (up to 66 pages). 



»1 - DISPLAY LISTS 

Learn to create your own graphics 
and text modes. 
•2 - SCROLLINQ 

Explains how to move the screen 
over maps of graphics or text. 
*3 - PAGE FLIPPING 
Change the entire screen instantly to 
another display picture. 
•4-BEQINNING ANIMATION 
Learn to create the illusion of 
movement using simple shapes. 
»S- PLAYER MISSILE 
GRAPHICS - Create your own 
■PACMAN' type game while learning 
about Coiiislons, Backgrounds. Play- 
ers, Scoring, and more. 

•e- SOUND a MUSIC 

Learn a simple way to write music 
and sound effects on your Atari. 
*7 - DISK UTILITIES 
Seven disk tools. FORMATER, IN- 
SPECTOR, AUTORUN SYS MAKER, 
RPM CHECKER, MENU MAKER, 
DIRECTORY PRINTER & FILES 



»8-CHARACTER GRAPHICS 

Change letter shapes into anything 
you wish. Includes an editor that 
makes creating and animating the 
shapes easy; and a linker that actually 
writes BASIC code. Complete game 
Included as an example. 
•>-GTIA GRAPHICS 
Use graphics modes 9 to 11 to create 
3-D shapes. Place 16 colors on the 
screen at once, and even digitize 
pictures using these new modes. 
Includes a 9 color picture editor. 
#10 - SOUND EFFEECT8 
30 simple sound effects like lasers 
and bombs, and an effects editor. 
Explains how to combine sounds 
and graphics, and 16 bit sounds for 
extended range. 

#11 - MEMORY MAP TUTORIAL 
How to control cursor text windows, 
user keys, joysticks and paddles, 
tabs. Inverse video, upside down let- 
ters, break key protection, and 25 
more. 



*12 - 8.A.M. TUTUORIAL 

Learn to make S.A.M. sing, change 
voice, sound, add graphics, explore 
phonemes, and change Inflection. 
Requires S.A.M. by Don't Ask. 
#13 -BASIC TOOLS 
Adds the following to BASIC: RE- 
NUMBER. DELETE. TRACE. EXPAND, 
QUICKREF, AND LISTER. 
«14 - ADVANCED PROGRAMMING 
TOOLS 

Machine language tools used to write 
commercial programs useable from 
Basic or Assembly. PLAYER MISSILE 
MOVEMENT. TIME DELAYS, SOUND 
EFFECTS. PAGEFLIPPINQ. MEMORY 
MOVEMENT. SPECIAL CHARACTER 
FONTS, and SAVE FULL GRAPHICS 
SCREENS (I/O) IN SECONDS. 
#15 -FANCY FONTS 
Includes many sample fonts, an 
editor, and adds a new set of sub- 
routines you can call to create great 
displays. Print the fonts out on your 
printer as you create them. 



TUTORIAL 

Buy 1 to 5 at only $11.95 aach « 6 to 10 at only $9.95 aach « 11 to 15 at only $7.95 each 



TERMS: All deleclivs disks will be replaced tree Including return postage. Wrfte tirst with details lor Return 

Aulhoriietion. All orders are shipped by U.S. Mali. Add H.95shipplng and handling lor 1105 disi<s. Add f 2.95 lor 

6 to 10 disl(s Add $3.95 tor 11 to 15 dislts. Outside of U.S.A. i Canada edd 15% lor shipping and handling 

I Minimum -H.OO) U.S. Funds ONL VI Celilornie residents MUST add Sales Tax. We accept checks and money 

orders Sorry NO Credit Cards or COD. Allow THREE weeks lor personal checks to clear our bank. SCHOOt. 

AND GOVERNMENT PURCHASE ORDERS WELCOME! 

Sorry, no catalog. We distribute and publish only whet we edvertlse herein. 

We encourage soltware authors to submit their programs lor evaluation. We pay competitive royalties on a 

monthly basis. 

Atari is the registered tredemark of Atari Corp. 



ADVANCED 
MUSICSYSTEM II 

by Lee Actor 
Allows you to compose 
and/or copy music 
with your Atari computer! 
All new machine code. 

• Control over pitch 
duration, envelope 
dynamic level, meter, 
tempo and key. 

■ 4 independent voices 
' S^/i octaves per voice 

• Save up to 8200 notes 

• Custom DOS 

■ FULL instructions 

• 24K disk 
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communications 



GAMES 

contined from page 8 



will be asked to present your user- 
name and password. As you pass 
through customs, you can pick out 
one of the 15 styles of droid bodies 
from Wardrobe. Your joystick- 
controlled droid icon now becomes 
your onscreen character for explor- 
ing and interacting with the world of 
GCP. 

Step past the customs desk to a 
door marked City and press the 
joystick button. You are prompted to 
insert your City Disk. The disk drive 
whirs for a moment and your droid 
is transported to the magical realm 
where much of the GCP action takes 
place. 

As you look around the main plaza 
you see stairs and corridors leading to 
rooms labeled Post Office, Social Hall, 
Gaines and Office. You can guide your 
droid into any of these rooms and ex- 
plore the activities. 

Along the way, you may meet other 
droid characters who represent addi- 
tional users online with you. You can 
stop and talk to them simply by typ- 
ing your dialogue. Pressing the [OP- 
TION] key puts you in Whisper Mode 
that can only be heard by selected 
droids. Or you can invite a group in- 
to a Social Hall room for an impromp- 
tu conference. 

The Social Hall is filled with a series 
of rooms numbered like apartments 
for easy location. If you meet friends 
in the corridor you can ask them to 
meet you in Room 120, for example. 
Once you're at this actual location, 
you have the option of closing the 
room door to exclude other users and 
carry on a private conversation. Or if 
you'd like to be more sociable, you 
can leave the door open and invite 
everyone in. 

CYBERTANK WARRIORS 

You may decide after awhile in the 
Social Hall to engage in a little online 



mayhem in the Game room. You in- 
sert your Game Disk and invite some 
of your more fearless friends to join 
you in a friendly (ha, ha) game of 
Cybeflank. 

This little diversion allows you to 
design your own tank, complete with 
customized weaponry, and do battle 
with multiple players in real-time on 
a colorful scrolling screen. Watch out 
for the more experienced players who 
can shoot the wings off a fly from 
miles away. Actually, they'll help out 
novices like you as long as you don't 
get too uppity! 

BioWar is a single/multiple player 
game that's a strategy version of the 
computer classic Life. You position 
cell colonies so that you can trap or 
destroy an opponent. 

GCP has more games under con- 
struction, SpaceLanes and War These 
should be available to subscribers by 
the time you read this. 

Details on War have yet to be re- 
leased. But SpaceLanes promises to be 
quite an epic. It features unlimited 
online players cruising around in their 
starships and wreaking havoc in a 
huge electronic universe filled with 
unlimited realistic planets. 



GCP POST OFFICE 

The Post Office in GCP represents a 
masterpiece of software design. Vir- 
tually any type of mailing can be sent 
to any individual user or group of 
users. Public domain program up- 
loads and downloads are also handled 
within the post office. 

As of this wridng, more than 120 
public domain downloads were 
online. You are encouraged to upload 
any interesting public domain soft- 
ware you may have. A custom file 
transfer protocol virtually guarantees 
error free transmission. 

The Office is where you frequent- 
ly may find the systems operators of 
GCP If they're online you might 



wander in to say hello or ask a few 
questions. The sysops are very helpful 
to new users. Of course, you can 
always leave mail if no one is at work. 

ICON POWER 

Scattered through all areas and rooms 
of the GCP world, you'll find icons 
representing telephones and com- 
puter terminals. From the telephones 
you can contact other online users by 
typing their usernames, even if you 
can't see their droids. 

The terminals support numerous 
functions. From a terminal you can 
type various commands that elimi- 
nate the need to walk from room to 
room. GOTO instantly transports you 
to a new location, WHO tells you 
who's on the system and where they 
are, CHECK MAIL does just that. And 
there are several other time saving 
commands. 

GCP has recently updated the ter- 
minal software to Version 1.02, which 
speeds up system access. Future up- 
dates are to support additional games 
and faster access times. 

The sysops of GCP have ambitious 
plans for their system. Eventually 
they'd like to expand to convenience 
services such as at-home banking and 
at-home shopping. 

Games Computers Play is a fas- 
cinating interactive upgrade to the 
usual online fare. Give GCP a try and 
you could well be hooked too! 



GAMES COMPUTERS PLAY 
112 East Market Street 
York, Pennsylvania 17401 
(717)848-2660 



□ 



10 



ANTIC, The Atari Resource 





1 M^lflr 



Superstars aren't just the best in their 
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If you're scouting for the best football 
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If there are no convenient stores near 
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Please specify computer format and 
add $2.00 for shipping and handling. 

To order by mail, send your check to; 



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All our games carry a "14-day satisfaction 
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APPLE, ATARI, COMMOOOnE 64 and IBM PC/PC|r 
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€(s2(BlbmiiItai ^ A i^(gw €(DmmmMir 



ATARL 520ST 

Software & Peripherals 

We're The First! 

END-USERS GROUP, Inc. presents an original collection of the first 
software and peripherals available for Atari's terrific new 520ST computer! 



SmirOi ] BalflK 



iHaba Check riinder~l|L 

■^}*. Ih , 



:ChKk Ha. , 






H.b.-c;^;;;5 


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JMUHTtn nir M9 

[iiHniMd till If <«• >tu> nuri rt 

»rt>cir* pr>0-u UM (iliti u raulwi ■ 






1 Uaar ID 1 




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Haba Check Minder™: $59.95 

• A Checkbook and Bill Paying Program to help manage your money. 

• Arrange your register by checknumber, date, payee, or income/expense. 

• Keeps records logically organized for tax return preparation. 

• Automatically sets up accounts as you enter checks and deposits. 

HabaCom™: $59.95 

• A straightforward telecommunications program that's easy to use. 

• Supports terminal emulation or direct Unk to computer. 

• Full range of baud rates, VT 100 and TTY/CRT, Full/Half duplex. 

Haba Hippo "C"™: $59.95 

• A complete "C" language development system. 

• Includes a full "C" compiler, assembler, hnker and editor. 

• Supports GEM DOS calls and functions. 





HabaDisk™ 10 Meg: 

• 10 Megabytes of storage capacity. 

• Connects directly to your Atari ST. 

• Completely self powered. 

• Extremely high performance for fast access of information. 

HabaModem™: 

• A low priced 300/1200 baud modem. 

• Fully Hayes compatible. 

HabaWord™: 

• A very powerful, yet easy-to-use word processor. 

• Very large document capabilities. 

• Can view multiple documents at one time. 

HabaCalc™: 

• A high powered spreadsheet. 

• Both versatile and easy to use. 



$599.95 



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Call 



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To Order: Call 818-901-0714 

Shipping: add $3.00 for software products and $5.00 for hardware 
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or write: 

End-Users Group, Inc. 
15723 Vanowen St. Suite 326 
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Atari is a registered trademark of Atari Corporation. Haba Check Minder, HabaCom, HabaDisk, HabaModem, HabaWord, 
and HabaCalc are registered trademarks of Haba Systems, Inc. Hippo C is a registered trademark of Hippopotamus Corp 



AiAtic /T SectioiA 

October 1985 





F 



lU 




/T searcKes 540 nxegabytes ir\ 3 secorvds 



by NAT FRIEDLAND, Antic Editor 




540 megabytes of memory. On a disk 
that's smaller than a 45 rpm phono- 
graph record. 

What does that really mean? 

540 megabytes is more than 500 
million characters — enough typed 
characters to stretch 1,000 miles from 
San Francisco to Denver. It's equal to 
the amount of information that could 
be stored on 6,000 Atari floppy disks, 
or in 50 cubic feet of printed 
pages. . . 

The businesspeople who go to the 
huge twice-yearly Consumer Elec- 
tronics Shows are cynical pros who 
have seen it all. It takes a lot to get 
them excited. 

But the Atari exhibit at the (Chicago 
CES in June was packing them in to 
see scimething genuinely new— the 
540 megabyte CD ROM system (Com- 
pact Disk, Read Only Memory) run- 
ning on the 520ST computer. 

Software by the Activenture Corp. 
of Monterey, California put the 
26-voiume Grolier Encyclopedia on 
a CD ROM disk— along with a smart 
database that finds all references for 
any word in the encyclopedia in three 
seconds flat. 

This system will be premiered only 
with Atari ST computers. Atari is com- 
mitted to release a CD ROM player — 
targeted to retail at S 599— by the end 
of the year. Grolier will probably price 
the CD ROM encyclopedia disk at 
around 8150-200. 




Tom Rolander holding the CD ROM disk 



DRI BONUS 



CD ROM on the ST computers is in 
fact a major bonus from the Atari- 
Digital Research connection. The 
company that developed the three- 
second encyclopedia-indexing soft- 
ware was founded by Tom Rolander, 
a former operating systems architec- 
ture designer at Digital Research Inc. 
(DRI). 

Rolander has been a close associate 
of DRI chairman Gary Kildall since 
they met at the University of Wash- 
ington 14 years ago. They're both 
fanatical pilots and share ownership 
of a small armada of airplanes, in- 



14 



eluding acrobatic and ultra-light 
models. As an individual, Kildall is 
listed as technical consultant to 
Activenture. 

THE JACKINDrSK 

In January 1985, Rolander and Kildall 
went to see Atari Chairman Jack 
Tramiel. It was Activenture's very first 
meeting to raise outside support. 

Rolander and Kildall explained 
how CD ROM took advantage of the 
new optical disk technology currently 
becoming popular for digital audio 
recordings. Read-only optical disks 
were already being inexpensively 

ANTIC, The Atari Resource 








VAX 11/750 



H 



mass produced and could be adapted 
to hold vast amounts of any kind of 
computer-readable information . 

They told Tramiel that the Bible, 
Shakespeare's complete works, the 
total card catalog of the Library of 
Congress, entire medical and law 
databases, computer programs and 
video images too — virtually any type 
of data could be digitized, stored on 
optical disks, and referenced almost 
instantly by a personal computer. 

Only two CD ROM disks would be 
needed to store every phone listing in 
the USA for speedy updating. 

A single CD could hold a world 
atlas, a complete directory of inter- 
national airline schedules, and de- 
tailed information about major 
destinations. It would be like having 
an expert travel agent on a disk. 



Interactive CD ROM cookbooks 
could be programmed to recommend 
recipes based on your input of the in- 
gredients available in your refrigerator 
or on sale at weekly specials. 

After 15 minutes of this, Tramiel 
looked off into space and said quietly, 
"This would give people a good 
reason to buy my new computer, 
wouldn't it? 

As a result of that meeting, not only 
will the Atari ST will be first micro- 
computer to have CD ROM capabil- 
ity — ^Atari will have exclusive rights to 
the Activenture process for some time 
after release. 

EXCLUSIVE INTERVIEW 

In the person of Technical Editor Jack 
Powell and myself. Antic was the first 

continued on next page 



Video Editins Bank 



WHAT'S A CD? 

CD stands for compact disk, which 
has become the commonly used 
term for a digitally recorded audio 
disk that is read by a beam of laser 
light. 

This new digital recording tech- 
nology has great potential for un- 
prcccdentedly fast, acessible, high- 
density data stonige. 

Digital audio has become popular 
very quickly because it reproduces 
original sound with remarkable ac- 
curacy and dynaniic range. Compact 
disks also ha\'e virtually no added 
background noise or distortion. No 
stylus ever touches a CD to wear it 
out, there is no tape hiss. 

Digital music recording involves 
sampling the audio signal thousands 
of times a second. These samples are 
translated int(; binary code — the 
zeroes and ones that make up the 
bytes in your computer memory. A 
laser beam cuts the binan* code onto 
a master disk in microscopic "pits." 

Compact disks are then pressed 
from the master and coated with a 
thin layer of aluminum. They also 
have a protective layer of plastic that 
makes the CD extremely hard to 
damage. A CD player reads the 
coded pits by using a laser head and 
a mirror that focuses the light onto 
an optical seiisor 



October 1985 



15 



- BROWSE MODE - 




publication to interview Tom 
Rolander at Activenture after his 
I triumphant return from CES. The 
company is located in a brand-new 
high-tech office complex. It's along- 
side the Monterey Airport so that 
Rolander can clear his mind with 
flight breaks, if he gets bogged down 
in a programming problem. 

Enthusiastic and personable, 
Rolander started Antic's visit by 
showing off the latest version of Facts 
and Figures on an Atari 520ST. This 
is the program that comes with the 
encyclopedia disk and controls all the 
CD ROM operations. 

It should be emphasized that the 
software we saw here and at CES was 
not merely a demonstration fragment. 
The program was fully operational, 
with apparently only minor debug- 
ging left. 

Rolander called up the Encyclo- 
pedia Bookshelf screen and showed 
us the Browse Mode, which is like 
flipping through multiple books and 
pages with unprecedented ease and 
convenience. Using the mouse, you 
can swiftly move forward and back- 
ward, choose any individual volumes, 
sections and entries. 

It's a lot handier than shelving and 
reshelving five cubic feet of en- 
cyclopedia books. And any of the text 



displayed on screen is easily copied 
to your printer or disk. 

We then switched to Search Mode, 
the real selling point of CD ROM 
databases. Rolander invited us to ask 
for any article or reference. We re- 
quested "Transylvania." In a few 
seconds we had a long list of refer- 
ences and were clicking our way 
alphabetically through articles about 
Balkan history and geography, the in- 
famous Elizabeth Bathory and good 
old Vlad Dracula. 

The program can also do relational 
searches. It will seek out as many 
multiple topics as can be fit into some 
500 characters. And you can choose 
whether you want only those mul- 
tiple topics mentioned in the same 
sentence, same paragraph, or simply 
any article containing the multiple 
topics. 

We asked for a multi-topic search 
on: German, Submarine. A fuU screen 
of references popped up in a flash. As 
we scanned the alphabetized head- 
ings, we were surprised to see an 
entry for "Hemingway, Ernest." 

Unable to resist taking a look, we 
immediately clicked to Hemingway's 
biography article and discovered that 
the great novelist considered himself 
to be a volunteer anti-submarine 
watcher during WWII when he lived 



in Cuba. This is typical of the kind of 
unexpected information that Activen- 
ture's CD ROM software consistently 
turns up. 

For a search on pioneer psycholo- 
gist Carl Jung, Rolander selected the 
Bibliography choice from the search 
window menu. We instantly saw a 
screen full of book references, ar- 
ranged by topics and subtopics. Here 
is another valuable research tool pro- 
vided by the Activenture CD ROM 
software. 

We asked Rolander if the software 
would support "wild card" searches. 
He said that it could be done, but he 
was still trying to decide on a wild 
card system that would be easier for 
non-programmers than the asterisks 
and question marks commonly used 
in computer files for indicating the 
search's wild characters. 

The hardware set-up doing all this 
was a standard 520ST cabled to a 
Philips CMIOO CD ROM player via a 
prototype controller box. When the 
product is released, the controller 
interface circuitry will be reduced to 
a board inside the disk player. 

Atari plans to contract with one of 
the major CD ROM manufacturers to 
make a disk player for sale under the 
Atari name. At this writing. Philips 
was the front-runner for the deal. The 



16 



ANTIC, The Atari Resource 



- SEARCH MODE - 




disk mastering for Facts and Figures 
has been done by Philips in Holland. 
The first CD ROM mastering facility 
in North America was due to be 
opened by 3M this fall. 

HOW COMPATrBLE? 

We started by bringing up our ques- 
tions about CD hardware. How dif- 
ferent is CD ROM from standard 
digital audio disk technology? Could 
you use CD ROM on any compact 
disk player? 

"No, it's not 100% compatible with 
digital audio. But the idea is to keep 
down CD ROM costs by using as 
much as possible of the CD audio 
technology," said Rolander "And 
there is a universal CD ROM standard 
that has been accepted by Philips, 
Sony, Hitachi and all the other major 
manufacturers involved in the field. 
So there won't be any problems with 
competing formats." 

Similarities between CD ROM and 
CD audio include the same 4.75-inch 
disk size, with identical mastering and 
duplicating processes. This keeps 
expenses low. It costs no more than 
$4,000 to make a master disk for 
pressing. The cost for pressing 1,000 
disks is $4 apiece. 

All CD players share the same prin- 
ciples of laser optics, the same motor 



and drive specifications. However, CD 
ROM requires greater precision in 
mechanically positioning the laser 
head and mirror. 

Also, CD ROM needs a higher 
degree of error correction accuracy. 
It uses 10 to the minus 12th power — 
meaning you might get a typographi- 
cal error once in a trillion times. This 
is accomplished by adding 288 bytes 
of error correction code onto every 
data "block" of 2,048 bytes. An un- 
formatted CD ROM disk could actu- 
ally store 600 megabytes. 

"CD ROM needs these more precise 
tolerances because you cannot have 
the two-or-three bit error factor that's 
acceptable for compact disk audio 
reproduction," said Rolander. Accord- 
ingly, he wouldn't be surprised if top- 
of-the-line CD ROM players also in- 
clude audio disk capability in the near 
future. 

WHAT'S ON TAPE 

'Any text that's stored on magnetic 
tape can be machine read and auto- 
matically indexed by our software," 
said Rolander, This immediately made 
us ask how much reference material 
was now available on magnetic tape. 
His answer was that just about all 
printed matter of any substance that 
has been published within the past 



five years could be found on tape. 
That's because the largest state-of-the- 
art typesetting machines, such as the I 
Compugraphic 8600 and the top-line 
Mergenthaler model, normally keep 
the text data on electronic tape. 

"Also there are the huge libraries of 
information already processed elec- 
tronically for online databases," 
Rolander added. "A surprising 
amount of this material is in public 
domain, often because it has been 
prepared by the government." 

Rolander predicts that CD ROM 
will soon replace microfiche film 
storage of documents. Activenture has 
already been contacted by a U.S. in- 
telligence agency about the possibil- 
ity of converting vast libraries of raw 
information into CD ROM databases. 

CD ROM SOFTWARE 

To get a better idea of how Activen- 
ture's software is set up to access 
massive amounts of data so rapidly, 
Rolander took us into Activenture's 
development room. 

We walked up two stairs onto the 
raised floor of an air-conditioned 
computer center and saw an array of 
state-of-the-art computer hardware. 
The heart of the system was a VAX 
11/750 super-minicomputer with 8 
continued on next page 



October 1985 



17 



megabytes of main memory and 1500 
megabyte disk drives. 

Across the aisle from the VAX was 
the video equipment, featuring a Sony 
professional broadcasting one-inch 
tape deck. A complete video editing 
system worked off the Sony, including 
a character generator, special effects 
and digitizing consoles and a camera 
stand. 

This video set-up has been used for 
establishing that it's technologically 
possible to incorporate digitized illu- 
trations into the Facts and Figures 
database text. However, the first en- 
cyclopedia release will not include 
illustrations. 

"For one thing, processing the pic- 
tures is very labor-intensive," Rolander 
explained. "We could fit 13,000 il- 
lustrations onto the current encyclo- 
pedia disk, at 32K memory per illu- 
stration. But that would mean some- 
body has to place 13,000 pictures on 
the camera stand and operate the 
recording controls each time." 

But that wasn't all. "Up to now, the 
encyclopedia companies normally 
own only a small percentage of the 
illustrations they print. The rest are 
leased from archives for one-time use. 
Activenture does not presently have 
the resources to negotiate rights for 
thousands of pictures. However, I'm 
sure it won't be long before fully 
illustrated CD ROM databases are 
marketed." 

Rolander sees Activenture as an 
"optical typesetter." Paid by royalty 
fees, Activenture offers the service of 
creating a fast, interactive index for 
existing reference material and data- 
bases. When Rolander isn't hurrying 
to finalize his software in time for 
Atari's September deadline, he's flying 
East to meet with traditional publish- 
ers and sew up more CD ROM rights. 

HOW IT'S DONE 

The CD ROM disk has four different 
sections. First is the raw data— which 
is nothing more than all of the en- 
cyclopedia, from A to Z. Then comes 
the index, or table, which contains 
pointers to all unique words in the en- 
cyclopedia. Next is the directory, 
which is similar to the file manage- 
ment sectors of a floppy disk. It tells 
the program where to find a file on 



the disk. 

Finally, there is the Facts and 
Figures software, which loads into the 
computer and runs the show. At this 
writing, Rolander was uncertain 
whether this section would be on the 
CD ROM or on a separate floppy disk. 
It depended on whether Atari made 
the CD ROM Player a self-booting 
peripheral. 

All the Activenture CD ROM soft- 
ware was programmed entirely in the 
C language. After Rolander wrote his 
minicomputer indexing program, it 
took the VAX no more than six hours 
to read the approximately 58 million 
characters in the Grolier Encyclopedia 
and create the index table. 

The program counted the number 
of unique words at just around 
141,000. Some 30 "stop words'— 
including but, a, and, of, the, etc.— 
were ignored in the index. 

At the same time, the unique words 
were also alphabetized and every one 
of their locations in the encyclopedia 
was mapped. One reason for the 
lightning speed of the Facts and 
Figures software is that it searches 
references in the index, not in the 
encyclopedia. 

Interestingly, the fully mapped in- 
dex takes up 50 megabytes, almost as 
long as the 58 megabytes of the en- 
cyclopedia itself However, the entire 
encyclopedia and index only require 
one-fifth of a standard compact disk! 
The encyclopedia text files must be 
usable with video monitors that have 
different resolution formats. So the 
software formats the text in real time 
as it is going into display. 

"To keep the program moving fast, 
it calls up very large buffers," said 
Rolander. "In fact, it will use whatever 
free memory is available." The storage 
buffer requires a minimum of 64K, 
and the Facts and Figures software 
will also need its own 64K of RAM. 
Transfer rate of the CD ROM is 150 
kilobytes per second. An important 
design element of the ST, to speed this 
huge data transfer, is the DMA (Direct 
Memory Access) chip. And it's no ac- 
cident the ST has this capability. 
Rolander and Atari ST hardware 
designer, Shiraz Shivji, worked closely 
together, once it was decided the ST 
would have CD ROM as a peripheral. 



CD FILE FORMAT 

The format of a standard floppy disk 
consists of tracks in concentric rings, 
each consisting of a number of sec- 
tors. Optical laser disks have two stan- 
dard formats: CAV (Constant Angular 
Velocity) and CLV (Constant Linear 
Velocity). 

CAV is similar to floppy disk for- 
mats. The tracks are concentric rings, 
each containing a number of sectors— 
except the sectors are called "frames" 
or "blocks." The CAV format wastes 
a great deal of space. The outside 
tracks are longer, but they contain the 
same number of blocks as the shorter 
inside tracks. However, CAV is easier 
to program for read-write access, and 
some laser video players use this 
method because it permits "freeze- 
frame." 

CLV is a spiral format, much like a 
phonograph record. All the blocks in 
CLV are equidistant along one long 
spiral. So there are three times as 
many blocks per track at the outer 
edge as there are towards the center 
The CD ROM's 540 megabytes in CLV 
format are divided into 270,000 
blocks, with 2,048 bytes in each 
block. CLV is the format of CD audio 
and some video players. Rolander 
chose the CLV format for his CD ROM 
system because it permits far more 
storage. 

AND THE FUTURE 

Personally we can't wait until 
something like the microfilm library 
of the "New York Times" becomes 
available on CD ROM so that we can 
browse among odd and obscure facts 
to our heart's content. 

At the same time, we have told our 
typesetter (the same one since Antic 
began) never to erase any of the 
magazine's floppy disk fUes from now 
on. It would not be a bad idea to bring 
out a CD ROM disk containing every 
issue of Antic. All topics and all 
listings ever printed in the magazine 
would be instantly accessible via the 
CD ROM database. 

And while we are at it, we might 
as well include every program in the 
Antic public domain library on the 
same disk ... WM 



18 



ANTIC, The Atari Resource 



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Software Submissions Encouraged 




How to corvvert ox\ 8- bit Atari 
program for tKe /T 



by PATRICK BASS, Antic ST Program Editor 



In May, 1985 I wrote a letter to the 
Editors of Antic asking if I could 
perhaps write an article or three for 
them. I mentioned that I had been a 
game designer/programmer for the 
old Atari during its heyday, and that 
later I programmed games for two 
Silicon Valley start-up companies that 
didn't quite "start up." 

So one Thursday when I'd just got- 
ten home from being told I was over- 
qualified to deliver pizzas, my father 
told me Antic phoned and wanted 
me to come up to San Francisco and 
see the editors. The next morning I 
hopped onto my Yamaha 250 motor- 
cycle and hit the freeway. Shortly 
before noon. Antic sat me down at 
a 520ST and wouldn't let me leave. 

I was in hog heaven when Antic 
hired me to learn how to program 
their development ST. I had already 
decided to buy a 520ST when it 
became available, my only problem 
was figuring out how to afford one. 



The pile of highly technical docu- 
mentation that came with Antic's 
520ST was almost three feet high. I 
took home as much as I could carry 
and spent the weekend reading it. 

Back at Antic on Monday morning 
I confidently expected to start writing 
my first 520ST program using 68000 
machine language, which I'm familiar 
with. However, the ST had other 
ideas. 

For one whole day I was stuck at 
one seemingly innocent statement 
(.ORG or Originate) that told the com- 
puter where to start putting my pro- 
gram into memory. The 520ST ab- 
solutely would not get past this. 

After what seemed like a couple of 
eternities I finally figured out that I 
was mistakenly assuming the 520ST 
acts like a microcomputer. In fact it 
acts much more like a minicomputer 

The ST operating system is essen- 
tially Digital Research's CP/M 68K, 
which is a multi-tasking system that 



can run more than one program at the 
same time. If two or more programs 
tried to occupy the same memory ad- 
dress at the same time, the computer 
would fail. 

Therefore every application pro- 
gram written for the ST must be com- 
pletely relocatable, able to run from 
any address. This is not really so 
strange. Any interpreted BASIC pro- 
gram on any computer is completely 
relocatable, it's constantly being 
shifted up and down in memory as 
you add or delete lines to your 
program. 

COLOR SINEWAVE 

It took another two weeks of solving 
more mysteries like "The Riddle of 
the Crashing .ORG Statement" before 
I was actually ready to get a program 
up and running on the 520ST. . . 

I had never programmed in C 
before I sat down at the ST. And I was 



20 



ANTIC, The Atari Resource 



happy to discover it's possible to write 
programs in C that look very much 
like BASIC. To demonstrate this, I'll 
explain how I wrote a program that 
does the same thing in C on a 520ST 
and in BASIC on 
any 8-bit Atari 
computer 

A simple pro- 
gram that I've 
used many times 
creates an im- 
pressive graphic 
display. It plots a 
sine wave from 
left to right and a 
cosine wave from 
right to left. Then 
each time it plots 
a pair of sine and 
cosine dots, it . 
draws a line be- 
tween them. The 
result is a pattern 
of lines that cas- 
cades differently 
across the screen 
each time. 

BASIC COLOR SINE 

It's safe to assume that more Antic 
readers can program in BASIC than in 
C. So let's get started by examining the 
BASIC program for 8-bit Ataris line by 
line. 

Line 100 opens a channel to the 
keyboard and line 110 sets the X, Y 
screen limits of Graphics Mode 8. 

Line 120 creates an endless loop. If 
you program a loop in BASIC with a 
STEP size of zero, that loop will never 
end. Since we have a beginning value 
of zero and an exit value of one, the 
loop will never reach one until we 
reset LOOP to a value higher than one. 
This is as close as we can get to a 
REPEAT. . .UNTIL construct in Atari 
BASIC. 

Lines 130-140 set the graphics 
mode and set the background and 
border colors to black. 

Lines I5O-I6O select a random 
number between 10 and 80 for the 
AMPLITUDE (height) of the wave. 

Lines 170-180 select random 
numbers between 5 and 75 for the 
PERIOD of the wave. The period of 
a sine or cosine function determines 
how many times the value returned 



from sine or cosine will cycle within 
a given space. The smaller the 
number, the more "hills and valleys." 
Line 190 places a random value be- 
tween 1 and 6 into the variable SIZE. 




Line 200 uses SIZE as a STEP value in 
a FOR/NEXT loop which determines 
the number of X points to be plotted 
along the X axis. 

Line 210 figures the first Y axis 
point. Look at it as BASIC would, 
beginning from the innermost set of 
parentheses. XPOINT and SINE- 
PERIOD might typically hold values 
of 110 and 30 which result in 3.66 
when divided. BASIC will then cal- 
culate the SIN of the result, which will 
yield -0.5012, 

This is then multiplied by SINE- 
AMPLITUDE, (typically around 50) 
giving an answer of -25.06. Since sine 
and cosine values may range below 
zero, and BASIC cannot PLOT nega- 
tive values, we add half the screen 
height (YRES/2) in order to shift the 
dot about halfway down the screen. 

Line 220 performs the same action 
as 210 for the cosine value. 

Line 230 PLOTs the first pair of 
points, using XPOINT and SINEY, and 
DRAWS a line TO the right side of the 
screen minus XPOINT and COSINEY 

Line 240 checks to see if a key has 
been pressed while the computer was 
figuring and drawing the line. If so, 
it cleanly finishes the loop by setting 
the XPOINT counter to its highest ex- 



pected value, which line 250 awaits 

to finish its drawing loop. 

Line 250 completes the logic of the 

drawing loop. 

Line 260 places the value of any key 
pressed during 
the loop into 
KEYPRESS. Line 
270 then checks 
to see if the char- 
acter pressed was 
an X. If so, the i 
value for the 
LOOP counter is 
set greater than 
its exit value and 
we the leave 
loop — and the 
program. 

GEM 
COLOR SINE 

Now that we've 

gone through the 

BASIC program, 

let's take a look at 

how it works in 

the C listing, step by step. If you are 

unfamiliar with C, you should first 

read our sidebar — C at a Glance. 

The first two lines of the C listing 
are comment lines bracketed between 
/ * and * /. The next five lines cause 
the C compiler to *include files con- 
taining previously typed definitions 
that may be used throughout the pro- 
gram. You may use or ignore these 
definitions as you see fit. 

The whole next block of code — 
down to, but not including niain( ) — 
is our declaration of the variables and 
arrays to be used by the program. The 
first two lines are required by GEM 
and provide a way to send GEM con- 
trol and input parameters, while GEM 
sends back parameters as answers or 
limitations. 

The rest of the int's are l6-bit vari- 
ables which we chose for the program. 
There are also two doubles because 
these variables will be required to 
hold values greater than 16 bits. 

extern double means that these 
are routines already saved on another 
disk file which we will link in our pro- 
gram during compilation. Think of 
these routines as pre-written 
functions. 

continued on next page 



October 1985 



21 



Since our program is small, it will 
all be contained within the tnain( ) 
function. All functions called within 
inain( ) will be provided by either the 
C library, or whichever files are in- 
cluded or linked at compilation time. 
Most of the functions will be GEM 
calls. 

THE MAIN 

Now that we've taken care of all the 
declarations, let's look at our niain( ) 
program, step by step. 

The first thing you see is a left cur- 
ly bracket (brace). This means 
"begin." At the bottom of the pro- 
gram, you will find the right brace 
which means "end." But within the 
program are more braces containing 
the beginning and ending of logical 
routines 

Our first actual program statement 
is appl_init( );. We can see that it's 
a complete statement since it ends 
with a semicolon. appl_init( ) is a 
routine that prepares GEM to receive 
information from our application. 

Following this is handle = graf_ 
handle(&duniniy, &dunimy, 
&duinniy, &duniniy) ;. Since GEM 
can have more than one screen win- 
dow open at any time, we need a way 
to keep track of which window we 
want. 

When we make this call, GEM 
assigns a number to the new window 
and stores it in the variable we have 
chosen to call "handle." 

GEM returns additional informa- 
tion from the graf_handle call — 
such as the X,Y co-ordinate of the 
upper left corner of our window. Our 
program doesn't use this information, 
but we need to provide parameters 
(&dununy) for GEM to store the data. 

C "FOR" LOOP 

Now we get to a statement which is 
very similar to a BASIC FOR/NEXT 
loop. The elements are: FOR (entry 
condition of loop; condition to be 
satisfied for the loop to continue; 
STEP value for loop). In BASIC this 
would be: FOR 1 = TO 9 STEP 1: 
NEXT I. 

In C the loop says: for (i starts at 
zero; continue as long as i is less than 
10; use i, then increment it). The last 



part could also have been written as 
i = i-i-l, or, more cryptically, i+=l. 

The instruction executed within 
the loop is contained between the 
braces. This loop fills an array called 
l_intin with information such as 
line style, color, and character size. 
This data is needed by GEM prior to 
opening the graphics window. 

The next statement is v_opnvwk 
(l_intin, &handle, l_out); similar 
to a GRAPHICS caU from BASIC. 
l_intin is the list of parameters 
passed to GEM that we prepared 
above. &handle means: "give the ad- 
dress of the handle to GEM", and 1_ 
out is an array that GEM returns 
describing things like screen size and 
number of colors. We can later access 
these values if and when we need 
them. 

For example, right below we use 
three of those values, xres is how 
wide the screen is, yres is how high 
the screen is and max_color is how 
many colors we can work with on the 
device opened. By using these vari- 
ables, instead of constants, we can be 
assured our program will work in all 
video resolutions. 

Now, we encounter a FOR loop 
which directly corresponds to the 
FOR loop in the BASIC program that 
defines our "endless" loop. This line 
reads; Loop starts at zero. Continue as 
long as loop is less than one. Each 
loop add nothing to Loop. 

The next DO WHILE construct will 
choose a color It reads: DO choose 
a random number called COLOR be- 
tween and 15 WHILE COLOR is less 
than zero OR (the two vertical lines 
mean OR) COLOR is greater than the 
maximum number of colors we can 
show on the screen. 

The next line, vsl_color (handle, 
color) ;, corresponds directly to the 
COLOR statement in the BASIC pro- 
gram. It selects which color the line 
will be drawn with next. 

The next line selects a random 
number between one and four for the 
STEP value in our drawing loop. 

The next four DO WHILE con- 
structs will select a random number 
for the amplitude and period of our 
sine and cosine values in the drawing 
loop. 



DRAWING LOOP 

Now we enter the drawing loop itself, 
which uses the variable iter as a 
counter across the screen. 

We indent again to show we are in 
another loop. 

Next we set xpoint, a double preci- 
sion variable, equal to the value of iter 
so we can perform floating point 
math on it. 

The next two pairs of lines will 
figure the values needed for our two 
line endpoints. The GEM call that 
draws a line is called v_pline( ), but 
before we call it we need to figure in 
advance which X,Y points the routine 
will draw to. Then we place them as 
elements in an array variable which 
will become one of the parameters in 
the GEM call. We could specify more 
than just one pair of points if we 
needed to. 



V_PLINE 

We now come to the nucleus of the 
program: v_pline( ). This call reads; 
"GEM, draw a polyline inside win- 
dow 'handle'. The line has two points 
and the X, Y coordinates for the line 
are in an array called 'ptsin'." 

v_pline( ) is very much like the 
BASIC USR calls which are in Antic's 
GUP program (June, 1985). You 
establish your parameters and 
variables, then place them in the 
parentheses and make the call. GEM 
does the rest. 

The matching brace which ends 
our drawing loop FOR construct acts 
the same as NEXT in BASIC. 



ENDLESS LOOPING 

We now come to a DO WHILE con- 
struct that creates an endless loop. 
The GEM call vq_key_s( ) will 
cause GEM to put the value of Shift/ 
Alternate/Control keys in a variable 
called key_state. 

It will continue to do this as long 
as key_state is equal to zero, which 
means no keys are pressed. (The == 
means "test for equality" and is dif- 
ferent from a single = , which means 
"is assigned the value of.") 

The IF statement causes the loop to 
exit by comparing the key_state 



22 



ANTIC, The Atari Resource 



value to eight — the value of the Alter- 
nate key. When the Alternate key is 
pressed, key-state is set to eight and 
the value for our "endless" loop 
counter is incremented, causing the 
exit of the loop. 

If the alternate was pressed, we fall 
down to the v_clsvwk(handle) 
call, which will free the space GEM 



set aside for our workstation. 

Then we come to the appl_exit( ); 
call, in which we "unhook" our ap- 
plication from GEM, and free the 
memory used for other applications. 

The last line is the brace that ends 
our main( ) function. 

We hope this detailed take-apart 
gives you some idea of how GEM is 



implemented in the Atari ST. Many of 

you have never used C, so you may 

have to struggle a bit. Again, take a 

look at GUP in our June, 1985 issue. 

GUP is very similar in concept to the 

GEM calls. The main difference is that 

GEM uses the elements within arrays 

and the arrays utilized as parameter 

elements in the calls. 

Listing on page 66. 



C is a compiled language, like 
assembly language. This means the 
original program is written on a text 
editor and saved in a file called the 
"source" code. This source code is 
compiled (translated) into machine 
or "object" code. 

C source code contains no line 
numbers. The compiler uses spaces 
as delimiters between the 
recognizable symbols. Therefore it 
ignores spaces and carriage returns. 
For this reason, you can write C 
source code in any format you 
please. However, over the years cer- 
tain standards in C formatting have 
developed. 

By custom, C code is written in 
lower-cxse Icttere, although it usually 
doesn't matter to the compiler, hi- 
dentiition is an important element in 
C readability. Nested loops, for ex- 
ample, are indented. 

NO LINE NUMBERS 

Since there are no line numbers, the 
compiler recognizes the semicolon 
(;) to separate logical lines or 
statements. Similarly, there are struc- 
tures — such as the B.-^SIC FOR/ 
NEXT loop, or the ACTION! DO. . . 
OD structure — which require a 
delimiter that does not even appear 
on the Atari 8-bit keyboard. This is 
the curly bracket "{". Left curly 
bracket means "begin" and right 
curly bracket, "}" means "end." 

DECLARrNG 

In Atiiri BASIC, all strings or array 
variables must be DIMensioned so 
that BASIC knows how much room 
in memory to reserve for them. In 
C, «W variables must be "declared." 
This is necessarv' because C vari- 
ables can take up different amounts 



C AT A GLANCE 

of memor}', depending on their data 
type. Declared variables can be a 
"char" (8 bits), "int" (16 bits), or 
"double." (32 bits). 

Let's take a quick look at the over- 
all structure of a C program, and 
then we'll list some books which can 
really give you the details. 

C programs are made up of a 
group of subroutines called "func- 
tions." Functions may be written by 
the user, provided by the C compiler, 
or provided by other files called 
"libraries." These library files are 
merged with the code during 
compilation. 

BASIC prognunmcrs may think of 
functions as USR calls. Parameters 
may or may not be passed to them, 
and values may or may not be ex- 
pected in return. 

Each function title will contain 
the name of the function, followed 
by a pair of parentheses which con- 
tain any required parameters. If a 
value is to be returned by a function, 
the word "return" followed by 
parentheses must appear at the end 
of the function. 

MAIN 

Every C program must have one 
function called "main", which calls 
the others. A small C program may 
contain only the main function. To 
follow a C listing, first look within 
the main function, which will act as 
a "table of contents" of the other 
functions. 

Since C functions may come from 
the language, or the user, or the 
library files, it becomes a matter of 
experience to differentiate between 
those function titles reserved by the 
language and libraries, and those 
created by the programmer In the 



specific case of the Atari ST GE.M 
libraries, any function beginning 
with the letter "v" will be part of a 
GEM VDI call. 

C BIBLIOGRAPHY 

THE C PROGRAMMING 
LANGUAGE 

by Brian W. Kernighan and 
Dennis M. Ritchie 
Prentice-Hall Software Series 
Enslewood Cliffs, NJ 07632 
228 pages, paperbound 
$24.50 

SUREFIRE PROGRAMMING IN C 

by Warren A. Stewart 

TAB Books, Inc. 

Blue Ridge Summit, PA 17214 

270 pages, paperbound 

$16.95 

THE C PROGRAMMING TUTOR 
by Leon A. Wortman and 
Thomas O. Sidebottom 
Robert J. Brady Co. 
(Prentice-Hall) 
Bowie, MD 20715 
274 pages, paperbound 
$19.95 

UNDERSTANDING C 
by Bruce H. Hunter 
SYBEX, Inc. 
2344 Sixth Street 
Berkeley, CA 94710 
320 pages, paperbound 
$17.95 

LEARNING TO PROGRAM IN C 
by Thomas Plum 
Prentice-Hall, Inc. 
Englewood Cliffs, NJ 07632 
230 pages, hardcover 
$32.95 



Listing on page 66. 



□ 



October 1985 



23 




^A 



Mac eats tKe /Ts dust 

by PATRICK BASS, Antic ST Program Editor 




Perhaps it's in our blood . . . 

Seems as if people just need to rate 
and compare things to see which is 
the fastest or most powerful. This cer- 
tainly holds true when it comes to 
rating different computers against 
each other 

One standard that's used for com- 



paring computer performances is 
speed of program execution. The 
same program, in the same language, 
is run on different computers. 

Since 1981, Byte Magazine's "Prime 
Number Benchmark" has been the 
most widely accepted test of com- 
puter speed. This benchmark pro- 



gram is a simple procedure for finding 
all the prime numbers betwen 3 and 
16,381. It adapts the Sieve of 
Eratosthenes, which has been around 
since the third century B.C. 

THE SIEVE 

How does the Atari 520ST stack up? 











Figure 1 






Computer 




Operating System 


Language 


Run Time (Sec.) 


68000 Atari 520ST 






TOS 




C Disital CP/M 68K 


3.8 


68000 Apple Macintosh 






— 




C Manx 


7 


68000 Apple Macintosh 






■ — 




C Hippo L2 


13 


Z8001 5.5 MHz 






Unix 




C 


1.97 


ZBOOO Z-Lab 






Zeus Unix 




C 


4.8 


Z80 






CP/M 




Digital BASIC 


15.7 


Z80 






CP/M 




Microsoft COBOL 


5115 


6502 Atari 800 






OS Rev.B 




ACTION! display off: 
display on: 


12.2 

17.9 


6502 Atari 800 






OS Rev.B 




BASIC 


389 


6502 Atari 800 






OS Rev.B 




BASIC XL 


214 


Antic th;inks Oaig LaGrow of 
ware S\'.stcni,s for the Atari 8-bit 


Computer Lanj 
language run 


uage magazine for 
times. 


providing comp 


irative C run times, and Bill Wilkinson 


of Optimized Soft- 



ANTIC, The Atari Resource 



We typed the "Prime Number Benchmark" into our 
520ST using C language and timed how long it took to run. 

The 520ST turned in a time of 38 seconds. This speed 
puts it right up there with minicomputers running the 
UNIX operating system! (See Figure 1.) A Z8000 Z-Lab 
Zeus UNIX minicomputer running C took 4.8 seconds, 
and aZSOOl 5.5 MHz mini running C on UNIX took 1.97 
seconds. 

At the low end of the scale, microcomputers running 
the benchmark took from 15.7 seconds (Digital BASIC on 
a Z80 microprocessor) to an astounding 5115 seconds (1 
hour, 25 minutes) on a CP/M Z80 running COBOL. 

ST VS. MAC 

The Macintosh is the closest relative of the Atari 520ST 
because both machines use the 68000 microprocessor 
Fastest Macintosh time for running the Sieve program in 
C was 7 seconds and the slowest was 13 seconds. The 
520ST left Mac in the dust! 

Note that this test does not depend on any I/O devices. 
Some computers might run a program blindingly fast, and 
then tiike the rest of the afternoon to write the results to 
disk. Other computers might take longer with the same 
program but write to disk quicker, thus completing the 
entire task in less time. 

Suppose we had selected a benchmark test that includ- 
ed sorting a number of disk files. The speed of the disk 
drive hardware and software could be as important as the 
actual speed of the computer Printers also tend to slow 
computers down a lot. An Atari 520ST can execute more 
than 10 million instructions in the time it takes a printer 
to perform a carriage return! 

We can also speed up the way a benchmark program 
performs its job. One common technique for doing this 
to take advantage of special hardware features found on 
your particular computer A familiar example for Atari 8-bit 
computer users would be to turn off the screen and speed 
up the program by 30 percent. 

MERE TWO MILLION? 

Just how fast is fast, anyway? Sometimes it seems funny 
to praise one computer for performing 8 million opera- 
tions per second and then scorn another computer that 
merely performs 2 million operations per second. How 
long would 2 million operations take you with a pencil 
and paper? wm 



^^Jackintosh** 

We wrote the book 



First there was the fabulously successful 
VIC-20. Then came the record breaking 
Commodore-64. Now Jack Tramiel has 
lauched his third home computer. 

The ATARI ST promises to shatter all existing 
price-performance barriers to become a leader 
in the home computer market. 



PRESENTING THE 



mmK 




This book, PRESENTING THE ATARI 

ST, gives you an in-depth look at this 
sensational computer that promises to bring 
you... "Power without the price." Some of 
the topics include 'history of Atari 
•overview of the ST 'components and 
operating system 'peripherals 'languages 
'user programs and more. Price $16.95 

Call for the name of your nearest dealer. 
Other books coming soon! 

For fast service call 616/241-5510 

Abacus mm Software 



P.O. Box 7211 Grand Rapids, MI 49510 
Phone 616/241-5510 Telex 709-101 



October 1985 



25 




\J 




iFlrst /T review 

Reviewed by Jack Powell 



Presenting the Atari ST has the 

distinction of being the first ST prod- 
uct to arrive at the Antic offices. It 
showed up here on Tuesday after- 
noon, May 28 and we were all pretty 
amazed. The computer was not in 
general release, and we had just 
plugged a newly revised operating 
system into our development 520ST. 
Yet here was a book about it! 

So what do we have here? Well, the 
frontispiece showed this is a transla- 
tion of a book published in Dussel- 
dorf, West Germany. (We have a copy 
of the original that was brought back 
from the Hanover Electronics Fair. But 
we were unable to find any German- 
reading Atarians to help us do 
something with it.) Presumably the 
authors had a head-start, since the ST 
was released first in Canada and 
Europe. 

Eagerly tearing into the English ver- 
sion, we found a compilation of infor- 
mation previousi)' available about 
specific parts of the machine — but 



PRESENTING THE 




Abacus Software 



PRESENTING THE ATARI ST 

Abacus Software 

P.O. Box 7211 

Grand Rapids, Ml 49510 

(616)241-5510 

$16.95 



probably not available from Atari. 
Much of this infomiation is not always 
specific to the ST, but it's still handy 
to have everything in one place. 

The book starts with a brief 
description of the evolution of the 
l6-bit processor, then focuses on the 
Motorola MC68000, which is the 
heart of the Atari ST. 

This leads to an overview of 68000 
assembly language, including a list of 
the instruction set, diagrams of the 
registers, and some examples of the 
addressing modes. The whole section 
is presented at an introductory level. 
Although none of it will teach you 
68000 machine language, it does offer 
an idea of what is in store if you pur- 
sue the subject further. 

Unfortunately, the authors provide 
no bibliography of outside reference 
material to guide the reader. 

Presenting the Atari ST then con- 
centrates on peripherals, beginning 
with a very informative block 
diagram of the relationship between 



26 



ANTIC, The Atari Resource 



the CPU, the special chips, the ports, 
and the peripherals. It spends a 
couple of pages on each of the 
peripherals and chips. 

The book is an odd mixture of 
highly technical, but sketchy, hard- 
ware-specific information, followed 
by elementary material. An entire 
chapter is devoted to Logo. It takes up 
space, but does not really tell enough 
for a practical tutorial. 

Another section has a diagram of 
the pin-outs of the 68000. This could 
be informative, but the authors don't 
foWow through with a discussion of 
what it means. 



There are several inaccuracies 
because the authors made assump- 
tions based on incomplete or out- 
moded information. For example, 
they had no way of knowing that the 
520ST's GEM would first be released 
on disk. So they refer to it as being 
in ROM. 

One section gives a very clear ex- 
planation of how BDOS and BIOS 
works, and then goes on to list BDOS 
and BIOS function numbers in CPM/ 
68K — which we now know are not 
the same numbers as in TOS (Tramiel 
Operating System). 

Nevertheless, Presenting the Atari 



ST gives a clear overview of the new 
machine, and is fairly accurate, con- 
sidering the limited information 
available at publication time. Predic- 
tably, there is a certain amount of pad- 
ding, but most prospective ST buyers 
will still be happy to get their hands 
on it. 

Antic congratulates the authors for 
accomplishing so much, so quickly. 
The publishers tell us they plan four 
more books on the ST before the end 
of the year. No doubt these will pro- 
vide much more detail. We look for- 
ward to adding them to our Atari ST 
library. Q 



Ur\der developnfxervt 



Flash! Just as we went into print. 
Antic received the completed 
4xFORTH, an 83 Standard Forth 
from the Dragon Group. It's available 
right now at S99.95 retail. And it's 
fast— twice as fast as MacForth. It's 
also capable of multi-tasking and 
multi-user functions on the ST. This 
is probably a first for any microcom- 
puter Look for an in-depth review in 
the ST Section soon. 

Atari has been busily working with 
developers. They assigned Arrakis 
Technology to produce a disk tutorial 
for the new machines and some 
dealer demos. 

Atari is also working with Mosaic 
Software to transfer their successful 
Lotus 1-2-3 clone. Twin, to the ST. On 
the IBM version, Twin can read Lotus 
1-2-3 files. On the ST, Twin will retail 
for $99 and will be available in the 
fall. 

Meanwhile, there should be no 



shortage of quality languages for the 
ST. Philon, Inc., a leading developer 
of language compilers for M68000- 
based minicomputers, announced 
plans to produce all their compilers 
for the ST. Philon currently has com- 
pilers in C, BASIC-C, BASIC-M, 
COBOL, FORTRAN, and PASCAL. 
The first compilers available for the 
ST will be BASIC-M and BASIC-C at 
$79 each, followed by C at $l49. 

ERRATA: Last month, we mistaken- 
ly reported that Sublogic would be 
producing Financial Cookbook for 
the ST. We should have said Electron- 
ics Arts is transfering this program to 
the new Atari. Sorry, EA. 



4XFORTH 
Dragon Group 
148 Poca Fork Road 
Elkview, WV 25071 
(304)965-5517 



ARRAKIS TECHNOLOGy 

(Tutorials & Demos) 

1425 Dorchester Blvd. West, *400 

Montreal, Quebec 

Canada H3G 1T7 

(514)875-5477 

FINANCIAL COOKBOOK 
Electronic Arts 
2755 Campus Drive 
San Mateo, CA 94403 
(415) 571-7171 

TWIN 

Mosaic Software 

1972 Massachusetts Ave. 

Cambridge, MA 02140 

(617)491-2434 

PHILON, INC. 

(Compiler Series) 

641 Avenue of the Americas 

New York, NY 10011 

(212)807-0303 Q 



October 1985 



27 




BANJO PICKER 



Play bluegrass music like 
a bionic Earl Scruggs! 

by RICHARD K. LINDGREN 



Program your Atari to make sounds 
like an aiitotnated five-string banjo. 
Then just press two keys and you 11 
he strumming bluegrass rhythms like 
a bionic Earl Scruggs Banjo Picker 
is a BASIC program that works on 
all Atari computers of any memory 
size. 

Even if your manual dexterity 
is so bad tliat you can bare- 
ly type with two fingers at 
a time, your Atari and the 
Banjo Picker program will enable you 
to pick fancy banjo chords at a speed 
and accuracy rivaling Earl Scruggs . . . 
or at least Steve Martin. 

All you need to do is type in Listing 
1, check it with TYPO II, and SAVE it. 



CHORDS 



D7 Em 




WHAT IT DOES 

Banjo Picker uses the Atari's four 
sound generators to simulate the style 
of a five-string banjo. Each string in 
the sequence starts out at high 
volume, then reduces volume by steps 
as the successive strings are played. 
By the time the fifth string in the se- 
quence is played, the first has reached 
zero volume level, and can be sound- 
ed again. 

The program can play 11 different 
8-note patterns for 13 chords. When 
you RUN Banjo Picker, you'll see the 
current chord and pattern numbers 
displayed at the top of the screen. 
Below this line, you'll see a diagram 
of the banjo neck. A bouncing ball 
follows each string as it is played in 
sequence. 



Figure 1 



At the bottom of the screen is a 
display showing which Atari ke)'s 
control the chords and picking 
patterns. 

PICKIN' YOUR ATARI 

You'll see a helpful diagram of the 
Banjo Picker operating keys in Figure 1 . 

The chords are arranged in "auto- 
harp" fashion on the left side of the 
keyboard, four rows of four keys each. 
The four related chords in a musical 
key are found in each row. 

For instance, the top row contains 
the Key of C, with keyboard numbers 
1 through 4 controlling the subdomi- 
nant chord (F), the tonic (C), the 
dominant seventh (G7), and the rela- 
tive minor (Am), respectively. 

continued on page 30 




PICK PATTERN 











28 



ANTIC, Tine Atari Resource 






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BANJO 

continued from pa3e 28 

The next row contains the cor- 
responding chords for the Key of G, 
the most popular Key for bluegrass 
music. The Key of D and Key of A 
chords are on the two rows below. 
Three chords (C,G,D) are duplicated 
on the keyboard in order for the rows 
to be arranged consistently. 

At the right side of the Atari key- 
board, the 11 picking patterns are con- 
trolled by the 7, 8, 9 and keys in the 
top row, the U, I, O and P keys in the 
row below, and the J, K and L keys 
in the next row down. 

Use the [START] key to start and 
stop playing. Initially, the "G" chord 
and the first pattern are played. The 
[OPTION] key speeds up your pick- 
ing and the [SELECT] key slows it 
down. 

MAKING MUSIC 

Hundreds of simple folk-type songs 
can be played with as few as three 
adjacent chords. Place the middle 
finger of your left hand on the W key 
(the G chord), with the first and third 
fingers on E and Q, respectively. Bring 
the playing up to a comfortable speed 
with the [OPTION] key and try ac- 
companying "Comin' Round the 
Mountain" using only these three 
fingers. 

Next, try different picking patterns 
with your right hand and listen for the 
rhythm. Each pattern has eight notes, 
so it is best to change as the eighth 
note is played. When you are trying 
to change the chord and pattern each 
time, press the chord key slightly 
before the pattern key. 

PROGRAM TAKE-APART 

Lines 60-140 contain the heart of the 
program. The program sequentially 
steps through the frequencies repre- 
sented by the five strings. The banjo's 
distinctive sound comes from the 
shortened fifth "drone" string, which 
usually has a frequency higher than 
the other strings. 

The program rotates these five fre- 
quencies through four calls to a 
machine language routine which 
quickly POKEs the appropriate 
SOUND parameters with decreasing 
volume for each frequency. The pick 



pattern determines the order in which 
the strings are selected, and POKEs a 
diamond at the appropriate screen 
location. 

Lines 160-250 check for new key- 
board selections. The position in ar- 
ray KB corresponding to the internal 
code of the key pressed contains 
either a chord number, if positive, a 
pattern number if negative, or a zero 
for a "dead" key. 

Lines 260-300 handle the special 
function keys. The speed is decreased 
by an addition to the delay variable, 
but increased by halving it, which 
allows you to cjuickly get any desired 
speed. 

The initial display is handled in 
lines 310-370, after which the sound 
POKE routine and frequency values 
are read into arrays. Next, the chords 
and pick patterns are read in, along 
with the internal code for the cor- 
responding keyboard position. 

TUNING yOUR BANJO 

In line 580, you can alter the initial 
chord played (variable P), the initial 
pick pattern (PP), and the speed (W). 
Variables CI through C4, initialized in 
line 570, control the tone type and 
volume. The volume fade can be al- 
tered by changing these variables, ad- 
ding 160 to the volume level (0—15) 
for each sound generator. The total 
volume should not exceed 32. 

The chord data is composed of the 
internal keyboard code, followed by 
the appropriate positions in the fre- 
quency array (PL) for each of the five 
strings and the chord name. 

These can be changed to create 
new chords or to place them on dif- 
ferent keyboard keys. The key's inter- 
nal code is not the same as its ASCII 
code. To find the internal code for any 
key, use the one-line program below. 
The code for each key will be dis- 
played as it is pressed. 

10 PRINT PEEK(764) : GOTO 10 

Likewise, the pick patterns consist 
of the keyboard code followed by the 
numbers of the strings in the eight- 
note sequence. These patterns and 
others can be found in Bluegrass 
Banjo by Peter Wernick (Oak Publica- 
tions, 1974). 



KEY VARIABLES 



SC(22) 


The array containing 




the scale values for 




22 notes. 


PK(11,8) 


The eleven eight-note 




picking patterns. 


PL(13,5) 


The scale values for 




each string for thir- 




teen chords. 


SIMUL$(16) 


The sound poke 




routine. 


A$(30) 


A string for reading 




and displaying the 




banjo picture. 


CN$(39) 


A string containing 




3-character chord 




names for each 




chord. 



KB(63) The array which con- 

tains the chord or 
pattern numbers for 
each keyboard key. 

STl The screen address 

next to the string be- 
ing played. 

F1-F4 The current poke 

values for frequency'. 

C1-C4 The current poke 

values for tone and 
volume. 

U The address of the 

sound poke routine. 

LST The last key pressed. 

P1,P2 Positions in string 

CNS containing the 
chord name. 

W The speed delay 

value. 

P The current chord 

being played. 

PP The current pick 

pattern. 

Richard K. Ltndgren is a CPA and a 
business professor at Graceland Col- 
lege in Lamoni, Iowa. He is author 
of a new Antic APX Classic two- 
program disk, Real Estate Cash 
Flow Analysis and Strategic 
Financial Ratio Analysis. When 
finance gets dull, he picks a home- 
made, left-handed banjo. 

Listing on page 55 Q 



30 



ANTIC, Tlie Atari Resource 



same of the moi^h 1 




>1 Paranoid Fantasy ' ' is the author s 
fitting subtitle for tins implacable 
and intimidating arcade game. 
Smash the lights, avoid the con- 
tagious inmates, snatch every key. 
But whatever you do, keep moving— 
or you 'II go mad. This BASIC pro- 
gram works on all .Atari computers 
of any memory size, ivith disk or 
cassette. 

Jack Nicholson didn't have it nearly 
this tough in "One Flew Over the 
Cuckoo's Nest." 

Tough break, sucker During your 
interplanetary travels you were un- 
justly thrown into an insane asylum. 
Never mind why. And you better 
believe this funny-farm isn't like any 
sanitarium back home on good old 
Earth. . . 



RED OCTOPI 



AH the other inmates are these 
octopus-like red aUens who have been 
pumped full of pacifying drugs. They 
don't ever do anything except stagger 
mindlessly like zombies from left to 
right. 

High dosages of those pacifying 
drugs have produced a truly horrify- 
ing side effect in the red-octopus 
aliens. Yes, you guessed it! An inmate's 
merest touch is instant death to Earth- 
lings. You lose a life that can only be 
re-earned with 10,000 points. 

Is there no faint glimmer of hope?? 
C'mon, get serious. Of course you've 
got one chance in a million. What 
more would you expect? 

The keepers may be sadistic, but 
they're also lazy and they left the keys 
lying around! Grab all the keys on the 



screen and you can move on to the 
next screen. 

Is there a way to escape the 
Asylum? Maybe, but we never found 
it. Probably all you can do is keep 
alive your sanity and yourself, and 
hope somebody eventually lets you 
out. 

LIGHTS OF DOOM 

To stay sane, you must keep moving. 
If you stay in one room, you will 
gradually go mad under the endless 
glare of the hundreds of Living Lights. 
These Living Lights move too — from 
right to left, at a faster pace than the 
zombie-brained inmates. 

Smash out those lights, I tell you. 

continued on page 34 



October 1985 



31 



■-t';'-,:/Yr.-;'':ai^2fas,3«5ffKc,s?.'^^ 



bonus same 



Piippiw"p""«^mnp» 




& \ 





LEMONADE 



Article by GIGI BISSON 
Program by BOB POLARO 



Lemonade is a ivell-kncnvn educa- 
tional simulation that teaches 
children basic economic concepts. 
Bob Polaro's excellent Atari version 
used to be available in the old Atari 
Program Exchange catalog. Recom- 
mended for ages 8 to 12. This BASIC 
program ivorks on all Atari 8-bit 
computers of any memory size, tuith 
disk or cassette. 

Have you ever dreamed about starting 
your own small business? Lemonade 
tests your business sense. Your 
lemonade stand could make you rich. 
But if your business is a lemon, it 
could make you bankrupt. And if you 
go bankrupt, the game's over 

THE SQUEEZE 

When life gives you lemons, you can 
make lemonade. But you might not 
necessarily make a profit. The object 
of the Lemonade game is to make lots 
of money by weighing your lemonade 
production and advertising costs 
against anticipated sales. 




Your costs vary with supply and de- 
mand, inflation, or lemon shortages. 
Other conditions such as strikes and 
road construction can also affect your 
sales. And watch out for rainstorms! 
As in the real business world, you 
don't see the effects of these problems 
until after you've committed your 
assets. 

Does this sound complicated? Actu- 
ally, Lemonade is very simple to play, 
but it teaches these complex eco- 
nomic concepts. Playing Lemonade is 
a little like playing Monopoly — or like 
an earthbound version of the science- 
fiction business game M.U.L.E. 

Of course, the object is to be a 
shrewd investor and make lots of 
bucks. Meanwhile, you'll learn 
something about the laws of supply 
and demand, the effects of advertis- 
ing your business, and the influence 
of unexpected events on business 
ventures. 

The information is presented in col- 
or and there are a few sound effects, 
but no graphics. Lemonade probably 
wouldn't hold the attention of young 



Photography Linda Tapscott 

children very long. But older children 
will find that making money can be 
as much fun as zapping space aliens! 
Teachers can easily use the program 
to support lesson plans that define 
terms like "assets" and concepts like 
"inflation." 

HOW TO SUCCEED 

You run a lemonade stand. It costs 
you money to make lemonade and to 
advertise your stand. The object is to 
make decisions that will help you 
earn as much money as possible. 

To start your lemonade business, 
type in the program, check it with 
TYPO n, and SAVE a copy before you 
RUN it. Antic disk subscribers will 
find the program under the file name 
LEMONADE. BAS. When you begin 
the game, you will see a color display 
telling you it's Day 1. 

You begin with S2 in assets. (Assets 
are how much money you have to 
spend.) You use your assets to buy in- 
gredients and make signs. On the first 
day, it only costs you 2 cents to make 
continued on page 34 



32 



ANTIC, The Atari Resource 



Simulator n 














^^Mtyourself in the pilot's seat of a Piper 181 Cherokee Archer|xJ^r an awe-inspiring f iight over realistic scener 
from New Yorl( to Los Angeles. High speed color-filled SD^aphics will give you a beautiful panoramic vie; 
as you practice takeoffs, landings, and aerobatics. Complete documentation will get you airborne quickly f 
even if you've never flown before. When you think you're ready, you can play the World War I Ace aerial battle* 
game. Flight Simulator II features include ■ animated color 3D graphics ■ day, dusk, and night flying model 
■ over 80 airports in four scenery areas: New York, Chicago, Los Angeles, Seattle, with additional scenery 
areas available ■ user-variable weather, from clear blue skies to grey cloudy conditions ■ complete flight 
instrumentation ■ VOR, ILS, ADF, and DME radio equipped ■ navigation facilities and course plotting ■ World 
War I Ace aerial battle game ■ complete Information manual and flight handbook. ^^ 



iee your dealer . . . 

or write or call for more information. For direct orders please add $1 .50 for 
shipping and specify UPS or first class mail delivery. American Express, Diner's 
Club, MasterCard, and Visa accepted. 

Order Line: 800/637-4983 



[u][o)LOGIC 

Oorporation 

713 Edgebrook Drive 
Champaign IL 61820 

(217) 359-8482 Telex: 206995 



same of the month 



ALIEN ASYLUM 

continued from page 31 



It is your only defense against the en- 
croaching madness. Break a light and 
you gain one sanity point, leave a light 
unbroken and you lose one point. If 
you have 99 sanity points you are 
perfectly sane. At zero sanity points 
you arc utterly insane and you lose 
one life. 

Displayed at the bottom of the 
screen are your score, lives, play level, 
sanity points and number of keys left 
in the room. 

The higher the level, the faster the 
inmates come at you, and the more 
keys you must snatch in order to keep 
going. 

Type in Listing 1, ASYLUM.BAS, 
check it with TYPO II and SAVE a 



copy before you RUN it. Now get 
ready to fight for your sanity. 

One way this game provides the il- 
lusion that you're going crazy is the 
diabolical joystick action. There's an 
inertia routine in lines 200-220. If 
your joystick isn't moving (LX and LY 
are both zero) your player continues 
sliding along in one direction until it 
either hits a wall, or hits an inmate 
and dies. 

FAKE SCROLL 

Asylum uses the time-honored Atari 
design tool of redefining a character 
set in Graphics 1. However, there is 
one unusual technique in the program 
(which I admit I discovered by acci- 
dent) that goes a long way towards 
disguising the low-resolution 
movement. 



In line 390, NF stores a bit pattern 
(8 bits in a row) consisting of 7 bits 
off and one bit on. Each time NF is 
multiplied by two, the bit that's on 
moves one position. Thus, the 
smooth movement of all the Living 
Lights is accomplished by repeatedly 
POKEing a doubled number into the 
character — 1, 2, 4, 8, 16, 32, 64 and 
finally 128. This gives the impression 
of a scrolling movement as the white 
dots march relentlessly across the 
screen from right to left. 

Spencer Craske lives in Paradise. 
That is, the town of Paradise in New- 
foundland, Canada. 

Listins on page 62 Q 



bonus same 



LEMONADE 

continued from page 32 

every glass of lemonade, but that 
won't last for long in these infla- 
tionary times! 

Some days, you might see special 
conditions that will affect your 
business. For example, a Teamsters 
Strike. This means the truck drivers 
who deliver }'Our lemons aren't work- 
ing. So the cost of lemons and the de- 
mand for lemonade will go up, and 
you can charge more. 

If Roadwork is displayed, the road 
will be blocked and customers won't 
be able to get to your stand. Or, if 
prices are down, you'll have to adver- 
tise more or charge less because de- 
mand will be down. If there's a Heat- 
wave, }'Ou're in luck — people will be 
thirsting for your product. 

Now you have to decide how many 



glasses of lemonade to make. Type in 
a number You can make up to 99 
glasses. (If you want only five glasses, 
type in 05.) 

Instantly, "Signs at 15 cents" will 
pop up. Sometimes the price will 
change. The more signs you make to 
advertise your stand, the more 
lemonade you'll be able to sell. You 
can make up to nine signs. 

"Price/Glass" will appear next. 
Think about your costs and the con- 
ditions and then decide how much to 
charge. You can charge up to 99 cents 
a glass. But remember, if you get 
greedy and charge too much, people 
might decide to drink the New Coke 
instead. 

Now the computer will ask, "Is this 
okay?" Type [Y] if it is. If you want 
to charge a different price, type in [N] 
and start over The new numbers will 



replace the old ones on screen as you 
type them in. 

The computer will do your accoun- 
ting and tell you how many glasses 
you sold and how much money you 
made. 

If life is sweet, keep going until 
you've made lots of money and 
become a lemonade tycoon. Of 
course, if your business goes sour, you 
might go bankrupt. If that happens, 
don't get bitter Just press [START] and 
try again. 

When Bob Polaro was a program- 
mer at Atari, he ivrote so much soft- 
ware that people used to jokingly 
refer to him as "Bob Co." He now 
runs an educational softivare pro- 
gramming business. Bob Co., in San- 
ta Cruz, California. 

Listing on page 63 L^ 



34 



ANTIC, The Atari Resource 



ATARI 800 COMPUTERS — $69.00 

RECONDITIONED "IN THE FOAM", NEW LOOKING 

NOT INCLUDING POWER SUPPLY TRANSFORMER ($1 5.00 extra) 



. ATARIWRITER, complete — $29.00 
. ATARIWRITER, no box or book — $1 2.00 

• 820 or 822 Printer, complete w/cable and 
paper, no interface needed — $39.00 

• Special Edition Disk Drive made from ATARI® 
810 boards, in custom case — $1 89.00 

• Special Edition Disk Drive with Happy 
installed (see ad below) — $339.00 

• Happy Enhancement alone — $189.00 
. DE RE ATARI — $9.95 



800 Computers board set ROM, RAM, 
CPU, MOTHER, SIDE - $39.00 

PAC MAN, no box, clean new 
cartridge — $5.00 

BMC Amber Monitor— $79.00 

BMC Color Monitor— $199.00 

Cables, Parts — Call 

Double Sided Quad Density Disks, 
box of ten — $19.00 

830 Modem — $19.00 

Touch Type — $5.00 



California residents add sales tax 
Minimum shipping charge $5.00 

Everything for the ATARI Systems to Parts 



SAN JOSE COMPUTER 

1844 Almaden Rd. Unit E 

San Jose, CA95125 

(408) 723-2025 




YOU CAN'T TELL 

A DISK DRIVE 

BY ITS COVER!! 




WITH A HAPPY ENHANCEMENT INSTALLED THESE ARE 
THE MOST POWERFUL DISK DRIVES FOR YOUR ATARI COMPUTER 

WARP SPEED SOFTWARE DISK READING AND WRITING 500% FASTER 

HAPPY BACKUP — Easy to use backup of even the most heavily protected disks 

HAPPY COMPACTOR — Combines 8 disks into 1 disk with a menu 

WARP SPEED DOS - Improved Atari DOS 2. OS with WARP SPEED reading & writing 

SECTOR COPIER — Whole disk read, write and verify in 105 seconds 

1050 ENHANCEMENT — Supports single, 1050 double, and true double density 

810 ENHANCEMENT — Supports single density 

SPECIAL SUGGESTED RETAIL PRICE: Get the HAPPY ENHANCEMENT 810 or 1050 version with the HAPPY BACKUP PROGRAM, 
plus the multi drive HAPPY BACKUP PROGRAM, plus the HAPPY COMPACTOR PROGRAM, plus the HAPPY DRIVE DOS, plus the 
HAPPY SECTOR COPY, all with WARP DRIVE SPEED, including our diagnostic, a $350.00 value for only $249.95, for a limited time only! 
Price includes shipping by air mail to U.S.A. and Canada. Foreign orders add $10.00 and send an international money order payable through a 
U.S.A. bank, California orders add $15.25 state sales tax. Cashiers check or money order for immediate shipment from stock. Personal checks require 
2-3 weeks to clear. Cash COD available by phone order and charges will be added. No credit card orders accepted. ENHANCEMENTS for other 
ATARI compatible drives coming soon, call for information. Specify 1050 or 810 ENHANCEMENT, all 1050s use the same ENHANCEMENT. 
Please specify -H model for all 810 disk drives purchased new after February 1982, call for help in 810 ENHANCEMENT model selection. Dealers 

now throughout the world, call for the number of the dealer closest to you . ATARI is a registered trademark of Atari Computer Inc. 



HAPPY COMPUTERS, INC. 



p. O. Box 1268 



Morgan Hill, California 95037 



(408) 779-3830 






■ ,.v 



"^A '■' ''■'• 'v .■ 



'y.;,''' 









.■*'■>;'»' 



:-^':.'M. 



.■\,% 





HALLEY'S 
COMET 

ON YOUR ATARI 

New software super-maps! 



by GIGI BISSON, Antic Assistant Editor 



Space Base, Halley Patrol, 
and Earth Views are three 
new educational programs 
that bring space vistas into 
your Hving room with amazing 
impact. 

This software opens up the map- 
matcing potential of 8-bit Atari com- 
puters in ways never seen before — 
rapidly producing sophisticated and 
scientifically accurate images. 

Its doubtful whether these pro- 
grams could have been written — or 
run — on any 64 K computer but the 
Atari. Because sales were limited to 
the Atari market, the authors couldn't 
find a publisher willing to take a 
chance on such high-quality scientific 
material. So the programs are now 
available only from the Antic Arcade 
Catalog in this magazine. 




HALLEY PATROL 

It may be your only chance to see 
Halley 's Comet. 

"The comet won't be visible from 
the Northern Hemisphere unless you 
really go out of your way." says pro- 
grammer and amateur astronomer Jeff 
Mehlman. 

But with Mehlman's Halley Patrol, 
the comet will be visible on your 



Atari. It soars across the screen against 
a changing background of stars, as 
celestial coordinates flash below to in- 
dicate the location. 

Click. Find out the best month to 
observe the comet, when the moon 
and sun aren't at their brightest in 
your hometown skies. 

Click. Pick any day between 
November, 1985 and May, 1986 — and 
find out where the comet is, how 
bright it will be, and what it will look 
like. 

"I'd make a lot more money if I 
could also write this program for the 
Commodore and the Apple, says 
Mehlman. "But those other com- 
puters are too limited to handle it." 

Mehlman is employed as a software 

systems analyst for the Best retail 

continued on pase 38 



36 



ANTIC, The Atari Resource 




ABBY'S CARRIES A FULL SELECTION 

OF SOFTWARE FOR YOUR ATARI. 

CALL FOR CURRENT PRICES. 



ATARI HARDWARE 

800 XL $ 89 

1200 XL $ 69 

520 ST System (Disk Drive, Mouse, Monochrome 

Monitor, Software) $789 

520 ST RGB System (Same as above but 

with Color RGB Monitor! $989 

SF 354 3'/? Addition Floppy Drive . , $179 

SMM801 Dot Matrix $199 

SDM n^ Daisy Wheel $249 

1 050 Disk Drive $1 49 

1 020 Color Printer $ 29 

1 027 Daisy Wheel $1 99 

1 025 Dot Matrix $1 49 

1030 Modem $69 

ATARI SOFTWARE 

Codewriter (D) $39 

Filewriter (Dl , $24 

Reportwriter(D) $24 

Menuwriler ID) $24 

Adventurewriter ID) $21 

Home Integrater (D) $24 

Small Business Inventory ID) $13 

Salesman's Expenses (D) $13 

AR/AP (Dl $13 

Retail Invoice (Dl $13 

Final Legacy (Rl $16 

Stat Voyager (D) $13 

Atari Lab Starter Kit (R) $45 

Atari Lab Light Module (R) $34 

Millipede (R) $16 

Moon Patrol (R) $16 

Track & Field (R) $25 

Family Finances (D) $23 

Football (R) $13 

Home Filing Manager (D) $25 

Assembler Editor (Rl $27 

Microsoft Basic II (R & D) $45 

BRODERBUND 

Print Shop $35 

Paper Refill $13 

Stealth $23 

Spelunker $23 

Whistler's Brother , . : $23 

Bank St, Writer $44 

BATTERIES INCLUDED 

Home Pak $39 

Paperclip $49 

B/Graph $59 

EPYX 

Rescue on Fractulus $25 

Ball Blazer $25 

Jet Combat Simulator $25 



If <. I' f «/ .y .m V I I ' i. iJBBBBBBBBBBBBI 
ir " i ^~ I -1 *' A ' i1 k H JBBBBBBBBBBBBBI 
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SOFTWARE HITS 

Ghostbusters $24 

Spy V Spy $26 

Bruce Lee $26 

Dallas Quest . . $24 

PQ Party Quiz $39 

Fancy Fonts $25 

Flight Simulator II $39 

Gyruss $39 

Mind Wheel $34 

(Needs 2 Drives) 

Trivia Quest $34 

Bank St. Musicwriter $39 

Bounty Bob Strikes Back $39 

Beachhead $26 

Home Accountant $55 

Micro League Baseball . . . .' $31 

Team Disk (for above) $15 

Halley Project $29 

Summer Games II $29 

Kororis Rift $29 

Load Runners Rescue CALL 

Temple of Apshai CALL 

SSI 

Six Gun Shootout CALL 

Field of Fire $31 

Operation Market Garden $39 

Kampfgruppe $49 

Computer Ambush $49 

Knights of Desert $35 

Rails West $35 

War in Russia $49 

Computer Baseball $31 

Questron $31 

Carrier Force $49 

Broadsides $31 

ICD 

Us Doubler $59 

(Makes 1 050-1 80K) 
3 Times Faster, True Double Density 



INNOVATIVE CONCEPTS 

Data Case (Holds 50) $11 

Flip St File II (Lock 25) $15 

ELECTRONIC ARTS 

MULE $16 

Pinball Construction Set $16 

One On One $23 

Seven Cities $23 

Archon II $23 

AMERICAN EDUCATIONAL 

Phonics $29 

Learn to Read $29 

Reading Comprehension I, II, III $29 

Spelling Grades 2-8 $29 

ALL OTHER TITLES $17 

INFOCOM 

Zork I, II, III ea. $29 

Hitchhiker's Guide $34 

Suspect $34 

Cutthroats $34 

Deadline $34 

Witness $29 

Starcross $34 

Infidel $31 

Seastalker $29 

Wishbringer $29 

Invisiclue Books $ 7 

Sorcerer $31 

Conan $25 

Ultima I $24 

Ultima ll-IV ea. $39 

MICROPROSE 

Decision in the Desert $31 

F-15 Strike Eagle $27 

Hell Cat Ace $24 

Kennedy Approach $27 

Mig Alley Ace $27 

Solo Flight $27 

NATO Commander $27 

Crusade In Eruope $31 



E 



ABBY'S SPECIAL BUYS 



Atariwriter (R) $29 

Visicalc (D) $29 

Synfile (Dl $35 

Syncalc (D) $35 

Syntrend (D) $35 

Arcade Champ (R) $21 

(Pac-Man, Qix & 2 Joysticks) 

Super Breakout $ 7 

Timewise $ 7 



■ Basic Tutor Kit (CI $24 

(5 Tapes ■ 3 Books) 

Bookkeeper Kit (D) $79 

All Spinnaker Titles (R) $16 

Pac-Man (R) $ 7 

Pac-Man (R) $ 7 

Star Raiders (R) $ 7 

Caverns of Mars (D) $ 7 

Basketball $ 7 



HARDWARE & ACCESSORIES 



Indus GT $239 

All Epson Printers 

Starting as low as $239 

All Star Micronic Printers 

Starting as low as $239 

Bulk Dennison or Nashua Disks, 

SSDD, 100 or More each $1 

Okimate 10 $199 

(With Interface Included) 



Ribbons for Okimate 10 $6 

Disk Notcher $ 5 

Covers All Types For Printers 

And Computers from $7 

Ape Face $69 

Koala Pad $59 

80 Column Card CALL 

(Batteries Included) 



Order Line 

1-800-282-0333 

ORDERS ONLY! Sales Personnel Do 

Not Have information on 
Previous Orders or Product Specs. 



ALL TITLES ON DISK UNLESS MARKED (R) FOR ROM CARTRIDGE 



M-F 10 a.m.-7 p.m.; Sat. 10-3 ET 
37 8. Broad Street, Fairborn, OH 45324 



Customer Service 

1-513-879-9699 



t^ 



B 

B 

B 

B 

B 

B 

B 

B 

B 

■ 

Bl 

Bl 

Bl 

Bl 



-id Prepaid orders over $50 receive free shipping, UPS, continental US. No waiting period when paid by credit card, 
Jl certified check or money order. Add $2 shipping and handling on orders under $50. Add $5 for COD orders. $15 kMasierCam 
^1 Minimum for VISA/MC. Hardware requires additional freight charges. Ohio residents add 5.5% sales tax. All items ^^^h,^ 
J subject to availability and price change. 

PLEASE CITE AD NUMBER WHEN ORDERING. 



HALLEY'S 

continued from pase 36 

chain in Richmond, Virginia. He 
studied astronomy at Northwestern 
University. 

"I was working on the graphics and 
trying hard to make the comet as 
realistic as possible, he recalls. My 
wife looked over my shoulder and 
said, 'Why don't you make it red with 
orange things shooting out of it or 
something?'" 

He resisted the temptation to create 
a flashy lightshow. "The graphics 
would have been easy on the Atari," 
he saj's, "But I wanted to be 
astronomically accurate." 




SPACE BASE 

It's a cloudless, starry night. An exten- 
sion cord snakes through the kitchen 
window onto the back patio, where 
a computer screen glows in the 
darkness. 

"There's Orion," someone cries 
out. But is it really Orion? How do 
you know what you're really seeing 
in the heavens unless you squint at a 
sky atlas lit by a dim flashlight? 

Enter the realm of computer-aided 
stargazing. Move your joystick to the 
right and an astronomical map of the 
400 brightest stars in a vivid blue 
Milky Way Galaxy scroll by. 

Zero in on Orion, press the joystick 
button and a starchart pops on the 
screen, indicating the star's color and 
temperature, along with its name, 
spectral type, distance from Earth in 
light years and other scientific 
information. 

Press the button again, and a mul- 
ticolored Hertzsprung-Russell dia- 
gram appears. This is an astronomy 
classification tool that indicates a star's 
color, temperature, luminosity and 
size in comparison to other stars. 



These are just a few of the ways you 
can use Space Base ($19.95, AP142), 
an astronomical database and sky atlas 
for the Atari. 

Halley Patrol author Mehlman also 
wrote Space Base. And he is current- 
ly finishing an enhanced version of 
Space Base that works with a Celes- 
tron Sky-Sensor Telescope. With 
the new software and an RS-232 inter- 
face, the telescope will move to find 
an actual star in the sky that has been 
selected from the database starchart 
by pressing the joystick trigger. 

The database for the software that 
controls the Celestron motor happens 
to be the same one used in Space Base, 
the Messier Catalog. It lists the 285 
brightest stars among the 3,000 that 
are visible to the naked eye. 

Mehlman also ended up writing 
nearly a full textbook of documenta- 
tion for Space Base. "The program 
leaches the equivalent of about one 
year of college astronomy," he says. 
"Even if you just play around with it, 
sooner or later you're bound to learn 
something." 

He daydreams about seeing Space 
Base used in a museum or observatory 
lobby. "This is the only fully labelled 
star atlas you can get," he says. The 
Greek letters, special star symbols, 
fine scrolling and minute detail are 
only possible with the Atari's rede- 
fined character capabilities. "Star pro- 
grams on other personal computers 
just show a bunch of dots," he says. 




EARTH VIEWS 

Control the world with your joystick. 
Watch the Earth rotate in your Atari 
computer Call up 250,000 different 
maps, each linked to a huge database 
of cities, states and continents. Get 
lost in the privacy of your own home. 
Richard Wilson's Earth Views 
(S19.95, AP141) does some of the 



amazing things you expected from 
personal computers when you first 
bought one — and also some amazing 
things you weren't expecting. 

Earth Views is the first program you 
can buy for any personal computer 
that depicts a 3-D image of the earth 
in rotation on any axis. It's also a 
geography lesson, trivia quiz, atlas 
and adventure game. 

Wilson's globe display revolves on 
any axis, or from either pole. A 
geographic database of some 250,000 
different views of Earth can be ac- 
cessed 29 different ways from the 
keyboard and joystick. Instantly you 
can see Japan, Ancient Greece, Stone- 
henge, Delaware, Timbuktu. Map after 
map flashes up in high resolution for- 
mat, so fast that it creates an illusion 
of "paging" from a huge mainframe 
computer. 

When you put in the disk a flat map 
of the world appears, overlaid with 
a view of the earth as seen from space. 
Press [STyiT] and the earth will begin 
to rotate. Press [SELECT] and you'll 
see the question "What place?" 

Type in the first four letters of any 
state, province, river, island, nation, 
etc. For example; Lima, Peru. Instantly 
a world map appears, as seen from the 
viewpoint of a satellite hovering 
directly above Lima. 

Ever wonder where you would end 
up if you tried to dig a hole to China 
from your hometown? Press the In- 
verse Video key and get an immediate 
display of the exact opposite end of 
the world. 

Use the joystick to move an 
"airplane" over the world. Press 
[RETURN] and the name of that place 
appears. But if you fly over the Ber- 
muda Triangle, watch out. . . You'll 
be sent on a geographical adven- 
ture/trivia game that fires off names 
of far flung places. You find one part 
of the world, only to be sent on 
another distant quest. 

"Don't be embarassed if you don't 
have the faintest idea where a place 
is located," says Earth Views author 
Wilson. "The world is a big place, and 
even college-educated Americans are 
sadly weak in their knowledge of 
geography." He included a [HELP] key 
compass for those of us with a lousy 
sense of direction. WM 



38 



ANTIC, The Atari Resource 




COMPUTER PALACE WE know atari! 

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30 column printer. 



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DELETE DUPLICATE-AUTO or 
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$19.95 

48K, Disk 

SuperMerger makes files from SuperMailer Plus com- 
patible with any word processor (e.g.. AtanWriter, 
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sign a form letter and send it to all the names on your 
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BOOKS 

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PRINTERS 



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TRIVIA QUEST $24.95 
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SHIPPING INFO: Minimum $2 90 Ground, S4 75 Air Actual 
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V-..1 ; 










STUDENT TESTS 
S.AX SOFTWARE 

Grades for Krell and HBJ 



by DIANNA HARMS 



My dad, Ken Harms, is an 
Antic contributing edi- 
l tor He reads a lot of 
% computer magazines 
and sees reviews of programs that are 
supposed to improve your SAT scores. 
But those reviews are written by com- 
puter buffs. Why not a review by a 
high school student who's actually 
going to use these programs to 
prepare for the college placement 
tests? 

I'm about to start my high school 
senior year in Danville, Caliornia. I 
have taken the SAT and ACT tests 
about four times during the past six 
years — twice as part of a research pro- 
ject. I have a 3.75+ GPA and I score 
very well on verbal and TSWE. But 
don't ask me about math! And I'm 
certainly no computer whiz kid. 

For this article, Antic sent me 
copies of Computer Preparation 
for the SAT ($79.95) by Harcourt 
Brace Jovanovich (HBJ) and the much 
more expensive Krell's College 
Board SAT Exam Preparation 
Series (S229.95) from Krell Software 



Corp. 

HBJ's nice plastic package contains 
three double-sided disks, a 50-page 
User's Manual and a 469-page 
workbook, How to Prepare for the 
SAT, that's also sold separately for 
S7.95. Quite intimidating, do 1 really 
have to read all this? 

Krell's package is a smaller, 
bookshelf-sized cardboard box. Open 
it and out fall eight single-sided disks, 
a 47-page booklet and all sorts of con- 
test posters, catalogs, guarantees, etc. 

Krell costs more, but the company 
offers to refund the purchase price if 
you fail to increase your score by 50 
points after using the program for at 
least 6 hours. However, normal 
classroom learning over the months 
between SAT tests would probably get 
you most or all of those 50 points. 

HBJ HASSLES 

HBJ's disks are divided into three 
major sections: math and vocabulary 
drills, vocabulary flashcards, and four 
full-length tests. The User's Manual 
stated; "To run the software, simply 



insert the disk and turn on the 
power." I did. Nothing happened 
. . . several times. 

Dad had to rescue me by suggesting 
that I try putting the BASIC cartridge 
into our 800 model. Thanks a lot, 
HBJ. 

I followed HBJ's suggestion and 
tried the tests first. After several cen- 
turies of load time, I was rewarded 
with a simple screen giving several 
columns of numbers and blanks. 

It seems you're supposed to read 
the question from the workbook, 
type the question number and then 
the answer, followed by [RETURN]. 
The program is so slow that I had to 
pause after each key. 

For instance, the answer "23A" was 
[2], pause, [3], pause, [A], pause, 
[RETURN] . After all this, the program 
doesn't tell you if the answer is correct 
until the whole section is finished. 

The section is automatically scored, 
wrong answers are highlighted and 
the correct answer is given so you can 
look in the workbook again. User 
friendly, it wasn't. 



40 



ANTIC, The Atari Resource 



The drills are well organized by 
learning category (analogies/sen- 
tences, analogies/categories, etc.). For 
each question, you get two chances 
to answer correctly and you know im- 
mediately if you are right or wrong. 

After answering, you can request an 
explanation. In general, I found the 
explanations helpful. They showed 
why the answer is correct and gave 
suggestions for solving similar pro- 
blems. Although the math explana- 
tions were sometimes too simple, at 
least they made sense to me! 

But after answering each question, 
the program infuriatingly asks, "Do 
you want an explanation? (Y/N)." A [Y] 
response tells you to "Press [E] for ex- 
planation". And if you press [N] the 
program says "Press [C] to continue." 
Even to me, it was obvious that these 
extra steps could be eliminated by in- 
telligent programming. 

On the plus side, HBJ'S workbook 
is a strong feature. It offers good old- 
fashioned study guidance, all the 
answers to test questions, and a good 
review of each subject area. Although 
it takes a lot of work, I think it'd be 
helpful for a brush-up. And it's only 
S7.95 without the software. 

KRELL'S CASE 

Krell's booklet gave simple and ac- 
curate loading instructions — a quick 
plus! The eight disks are divided into 
verbal and math, four apiece. Krell 
provides an "Automatic Learning 
Feature" (ALF) which is supposed to 
look at your performance and "alter 
the way in which problems are 
selected for presentation." 

But I didn't see any change when 
I answered some questions with ALF 
turned on and some without. 
Vocabulary words were repeated 
anyway, even when I got them right 
the first time. 

When the first analogy appeared on 
the screen, I was relieved that there 
wasn't a timer That's because I spent 
most of the time thumbing through 
my trusty pocket dictionary. The 
words are ridiculous — much harder 
than I ever found on the actual SAT. 

Example: The antonym of "RECAL- 
CITRANT " is "EMBLAZON, COM- 



PLIANT, PROBITY, INCUBUS or 
SATURNINE." Yep, it sure is! 

The drill gives no help or explana- 
tion, just the right answers. Questions 
appear quickly. Responses are ac- 
cepted rapidly. 

After each question, the program 
stops to show your cumulative score 
and waits for you to press a key to 
continue. I didn't like this. It broke my 
concentration and I wanted the score 
onlv after the end of a session. 



THAT'S NO 

EXPLANATION, 

IT'S A 

DEATH SENTENCE! 



Krell uses a scoring system of 4 for 
right, for skip, and -1 for wrong. I 
have no idea if that approximates the 
SAT, especially for the small sets of 
questions Krell lets you choose. 

Krell's math is terrifying. The ques- 
tions seem to be from medium to 
hard, mostly hard (at least to me). 

Example: WHAT IS THE LENGTH 
OF A LINE BETWEEN POINT A (5,-2) 
AND B (2,-4)? 

Now look at Krell's explanation: 

THE DISTANCE BETWEEN ANY 
TWO POINTS IS EQUAL TO THE 
SQUAREROOT (sic) OF THE SUM OF 
THE SQUARES OF THE DIFFER- 
ENCES OF THEIR X AND Y COOR- 
DINATES. (THE PYTHAGOREAN 
THEOREM) 

IN THIS CASE: THE SQUAREROOT 
OF 13 

That's no explanation, it's a death 
sentence! If you can understand their 
explanation, you obviously don't 
need one. The explanation ends with 
a question: "Do you want another 
question of this type?" Not a chance! 
And once again, you must look at 
your score. 

Krell's little booklet contains 
reading selections and a few math- 
related diagrams. Neither program in- 



cludes diagrams for the geometry 
questions on the disk. 

WOULD THEY HELP? 

These programs have two purposes: 
1) get the student familiar with the 
SAT testing style. 2) increase the stu- 
dent's knowledge. 

The HBJ package certainly 
familiarizes the student with the test, 
but at the cost of a huge time invest- 
ment. And if these programs also in- 
tend to make the student feel more 
comfortable with the exam, I think 
Krell fails. It made me feel most un- 
comfortable, even ignorant. 

HBJ's explanations in the verbal 
sections seemed to help increase 
knowledge. Their flashcard set did 
just that. But Krell's entire verbal sec- 
tions were simple flashcards. With 
both, however, you won't get much 
help unless the word you studied ap- 
peared on the SAT^only one did on 
my last test. 

HBJ's math sections could provide 
learning increases, especially if you 
studied the workbook. But Krell's 
math instruction was way beyond me. 

You have to be really motivated to 
put up with either of these programs. 
The hours and hours of real work re- 
quired to study are even more difficult 
to endure with both HBJ and Krell's 
built-in frustrations. 

These are serious programs — no 
sound, no color, no special effects — 
just dry, unremitting drills. Be sure 
you're ready for this type of experi- 
ence before you lay out any money. 

COMPUTER PREPARATION 

FOR THE SAT 

Harcourt Brace Jovanovich 

757 Third Avenue 

Nev/York, NY 10017 

(800) 543-1918 

$79.95, 48K disk 

KRELL'S COLLEGE BOARD SAT 
Krell Software Corp. 
1320 Stony Brook Road 
Stony Brook, Hzy/ York 11790 
(516)751-5139 
$229.95, 48K disk 



□ 



October 1985 



41 








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^ JOGA 







BREATHING 

Your guru, the Atari 



by LEN DORFMAN and JERRY WHITE 



Ytjur Atari can he used as a medita- 
tion tool for helping yon learn to 
relax and Ji^bt stress. Ibis liASlC 
/jroi^rain runs r>n all H-I>il itari com 
pnlers ofcinyineniorysiw. uilluiisk 
or cassette. 

^^ tiiri enthusiasts tend to be- 
^^^L lieve that using their favor- 
^^^^^k ite computer makes them 
W w feel better. Now you can 

put this to the test! Use your trusty 
machine to help you learn the 
breathing techniques of pranayama 
yoga which — if done right — let you 
relax and tight the stress of the worka- 
day world. 

Before you RUN the Yoga Breathing 
program, (Listing 1, BREATHE. BAS, 
which needs to be typed in, checked 
with TYPO II and SAVEd), read this 
article to learn the basic yoga ap- 
proach to breathing for relaxation. 

HOW TO BREATHE 

Within your chest are a heart and two 
lungs. Below that is the abdomen, 
separated by a flexible muscle called 
the diaphragm. 



Breathing expands the lungs and 
draws air into your body. Oxygen is 
then extracted from the air and passed 
into your blood. Without sufficient 
oxygen you'll be sluggish, drowsy and 
lethargic. Thus, correct breathing re- 
quires drawing air into the lungs so 
that the greatest amount of blood 
receives oxygen. 

Pushing your abdomen outward 
pulls the diaphragm down, expanding 
the lower lungs and creating a 
vacuum to draw air in. If you sit in 
an upright position, gravity will force 
more blood into the bottom of your 
lungs than into the middle or top. 

With this type of breathing, called 
diaphragmatic, you get more air into 
your lower lungs — where there is 
more blood to carry oxygen through 
the body. This is the most efficient 
method of breathing. 

Unfortunately, most people usually 
do chest breathing, which is not near- 
ly as effective. In chest breathing you 
expand the ribs to aerate the central 
lungs. This is relatively inefficient 
because most of the air does not end 
up in the lower lungs where there is 



44 



ANTIC, The Atari Resource 



more blood to carry oxygen through 
the body. 

FINE CONTROL 

When you've learned to breathe dia- 
phragmatically, this computer pro- 
gram will help you master the fine 
control of your breathing process. 
People with respiratory diseases 
should consult their doctor before us- 
ing this program. 

With this fine control, a person 
who practices structured diaphrag- 
matic breathing daily will gradually be 
able to produce the respiratory pat- 
terns associated with relaxed states of 
mind. 

A good way to get started breathing 
diaphragmatically is to try this exer- 
cise: Lie flat on your back. Put one 
hand on your abdomen and the other 
on your chest. Keep your mouth 
closed for all breathing exercises and 
breathe exclusively through your 
nose. When you inhale, push your ab- 
domen out and try to keep your chest 
from moving. When you exhale relax 
the muscles you used to push your ab- 
domen out. 

If you are breathing diaphrag- 
matically, the hand on your abdomen 
will rise and fall as you breathe, while 
the hand on your chest remains 
steady. 

Now would be a good time to try 
a simple relaxation procedure. Find a 
quiet dimly-lit space in your abode. 
Lie flat on your back, close your eyes 
and begin breathing in a gentle, 
relaxed, diaphragmatic fashion. 
When you inhale, imagine clean, 
fresh, vitalizing air entering your 
body. When you exhale, imagine that 
all your muscular tensions are leaving 
with your breath. Try it! 

The next step is to try that same 
two-handed breathing exercise in a 
straight-back chair. You may discover 
that your exhalation in this position 
might not seem as complete as when 
you were lying flat. The reason is that 
when you are flat on your back, grav- 
ity will aid your exhaling. But when 
you're sitting upright, the motion of 
your abdomen is horizontal. 

USING THE PROGRAM 

RUNning the Yoga Breathing pro- 
gram, you'll see the word 



PRANAYAMA at the top of the screen. 
This is the Sanskrit word denoting 
certain yoga breathing practices. 
Below this, you'll see the following 
parameters: SOUND, COUNT, IN- 
HALE, RETAIN, and EXHALE. As you 
are modifying any of the parameters, 
they will appear in double height 
letters. 

Place a joystick in port 1. Stick up 
or down moves between parameters. 
Stick left and right will change the 
value of the parameter 

The sound feature gives you audi- 
ble cues to time your breathing cycle. 
But at first, you'll want to use both the 
screen and sound prompts to cue 
your breathing. So leave the SOUND 
on. Next highlight COUNT and set 
the value to 10. Change INHALE to 4, 
RETAIN to 0, and EXHALE to 4. 
When these values are set, press the 
joystick trigger 

The program will display the word 
IIVHALE for approximately 4 seconds, 
RETAIN will be bypassed, and EX- 
HALE will be displayed for 4 seconds. 

MASTER 
THE FINE CONTROL 

OF YOUR 
BREATHING PROCESS 



The cycle will repeat ten times. While 
the program is running you can sit 
with a relaxed straight back and begin 
timing your diaphragmatic breathing 
to the program. This current set-up 
will allow for approximately 80 
seconds of practice (10 * [4 -i- 4] = 80). 

Once you've gotten the hang of us- 
ing the program, set COUNT to 40. 
Again begin diaphragmatic breathing 
and press the trigger. Follow the cues 
of the program, remembering to 
breathe through your nose in an even 
fashion. There should be no pauses 
or jerkiness in the breathing. 

Yogis place great value on the rela- 
tion between inhalation, retention 
and exhalation cycles. Try starting at 
4 seconds for the inhale, seconds 
for the retain, and 4 seconds for the 
exhalation. Notice that the relation- 
ship of the inhale, retain, and exhale 
is 1,0,1. That is a traditional beginning 
formula. 



As you begin to become comfort- 
able with the breathing practice you 
might want to gradually slow your in- 
hale and exhale to 10 seconds for 
each. A summary of some breathing 
patterns is listed in the table below. 



INHALE 



RETAIN 



EXHALE 



1 


1 


1 


2 


1 1 


1 


1 1 


2 


1 2 


2 


1 4 


2 



The bottom four relationships are 
for advanced yoga students and 
should not be attempted without in- 
struction from a competent Yoga 
instructor 

In a world filled with pressure it is 
useful to develop skills that help 
shield ourselves from the potential 
ravages of stress. If your breathing ses- 
sion goes well you will most likely 
feel more relaxed afterward. 

For further reading, I warmly 
recommend The Science of Breath by 
Swami Rama, R. Ballentine, M.D. and 
A. Hymes, M.D., published by the 
Himalayan Institute of Yoga Science 
and Philosophy. 



High school teacher Len Dorfman is 
a rarity — a professional, speedy 
machine language programmer who 
never really learned BASIC. He 
originally submitted this program to 
Antic as a lengthy, hard-to-type 
assembler listing. So for a smooth 
BASIC conversion, we suggested that 
Len get together with his fellow Long 
Islander, Antic Contributing Editor 
Jerry! White. 



Listing on Page 56 Q 



October 1985 



45 



Explore the world of visual calculus and create three- 
dimensional }• raphsjrorn mathematical functions. This 
BASIC prognun irill run on all Atari computers with 
48K memory and a disk drive. 

If you've seen the fantastic, computer-generated land- 
scapes in movies such as "The Last Starfighter," you 
know what a three-dimensional graph lool<;s like. 
Graph 3D creates three-dimensional objects in 
Graphics Mode 8, based upon functions of the form: 
Z = f(X,Y). Your landscapes, or objects will not be solid, 
but you can alter the density of the graph lines. 

The second part of this article will cover technical 
details, but you don't need a degree in calculus to create 
shapes with Graph 3D. Here's how to get it up and 
running. 

GETTING STARTED 

Type in Listings 1 and 2 and check them with TYPO II. 
There's some machine language in these programs, so 
make sure that your TYPO II codes are correct and that 



you haven't left out any lines. SAVE Listing 1 as 
GR3DLOAD.BAS. Since Listing 1 automatically runs Listing 
2, be sure and SAVE Listing 2 as GRAPH3D.BAS and don't 
try to run GRAPH3D.BAS by itself. Those using Antic's 
DISKIO O^nuary, 1985) should boot these programs 
without it. 

Run the program GR3DLOAD.BAS. First a title and then 
a menu will appear After a brief pause, a black graphics 
screen will take its place and begin drawing a sample 
graph. When the graph is completed, the menu wUl return. 
You can switch between the menu and the graphics screen 
by pressing [SPACE]. The commands on the menu are 
single letter options which can be used from either the 
screen or the menu. Choose a command option by press- 
ing the letter with no [RETURN]. 

For example, let's SAVE the picture that's currently on 
the screen. Be sure there's a disk with 62 free sectors in 
Drive 1. Type [S] and, at the prompt, type in the filename 
and then press [RETURN] and answer [Y]. You don't need 
the D: device prefix and Graph 3D will automatically add 
an extender of .G3D. For the technically oriented, Graph 
3D files are straight Graphics 8-1-16 picture files consisting 



GRAPH 3D 



Spectacular three-dimensional visuals! 

by PAUL CHABOT 




46 



ANTIC, The Atari Resource 



of 7680 bytes of screen data followed by 13 records con- 
taining parameter information. (See lines 910-918.) 

ENTERING A FUNCTION 

Let's type in a function without worrying about why it 
works. (We'll save that for later) Get to the menu by press- 
ing [SPACE], if you're not already there. Type [F] for func- 
tion. You should see the current function and under it, 
Z = . Now type 1-2*Y*Y and press [RETURN]. Next, 
type [E] for eye placement, then type 10,10,5 [RETURN]. 
Set the magnification to 120 by typing [M] [120] 
[RETURN]. Center the graph by typing [C] [160] 
[RETURN] [30] [RETURN]. Finally type [1] and enter 
-2,2,-1,1 [RETURN]. 

Now, to graph the object to the screen, press [G]. Parts 
of the menu will flash and you'll see the message "Com- 
puting Points." The graphics screen will then appear and 
begin drawing an object that should end up looking like 
a trellis tumiel. 

ALTERED STATES 

Many of the menu choices in GRAPH 3D alter the view 



of the displayed object. In most cases, you must press [G] 
to redraw the object using the new values. The best way 
to understand any of the commands is to try different 
values, press [G], then examine the results. 

Our example shows [M] will change the magnification 
of the graph and [C] will shift it on screen by entering 
new X and Y coordinates based upon the usual screen 
grid where 0,0 is the upper left corner 

[E] is the eye location in three-dimensional space. Place 
a square grid on the floor and the two directions of the 
grid are X and Y. A pole running perpendicular from the 
floor is the Z axis, and the three values entered are in order: 
X,Y,Z. 

You can change the number of X and Y cross-grid lines 
with [N] . High values give more detail to the surface but 
require more computing time. The maximum value al- 
lowed is 24. 

[O] when pressed, increments the graphing option. 
Various features of the surface can be accentuated by 
showing some cross-sections and not others. The options 
are: 

continued on next page 




October 1985 



47 



— all available cross-sections graphed. 

1 — all X sections, only first and last Y section. 

2 — all Y sections, only first and last X section. 

3 — all X sections, every third Y section. 

4 — all Y sections, every third X section. 

5 — every third cross-section. 

If you wish to alter these options, see lines 306-318 
and 522. 

The two intervals defining the rectangular region under 
the graph can be altered with [I] . These will show up in 
square brackets on the screen, but should be entered in 
order AX,BX,AY,BY. 

[F] permits you to enter a new function. If your object 
ends up a complete mess, have no fear! Press [R] and you 
may restore your previous graph which has been saved 
in memory. 

[R] will also work after a graph file has been loaded 
with the [L] command. The [L] command, which loads 
a previously saved picture file, is similar to the [S] save 
command in that you only need to enter the name and 
the computer will provide the device and .G3D extender. 

[D] will search the disk for any files with .G3D extenders 
and display them in the menu directory. 

[P] is a screen dump designed to print the graphics 
screen to your printer. It is designed for a Gemini lOX 
but the routine, which begins at line 960, could be altered 



for your own printer. (For a much faster screen dump 
that will work on various printers and can he used with 
Graph 5D files, see "Kwik Dump" by ferry Allen, Antic, 
March, 1985 -ANTIC ED.) 

TECHNICAL INFO 

Each point (?) in three-dimensional space is determined 
by a "triple" (X,Y, and Z coordinates). The first two coor- 
dinates specify a spot in the usual X,Y plane, which is 
visualized as lying on the floor. The third coordinate gives 
the distance of P above or below this spot. Figure 1 shows 
the usual orientation of the three axes. 

The graph of a function Z = f(X,Y) is the collection of 
all triples, where the third coordinate, Z, is computed from 
the first two using the function f . For example, the graph 
of Z = X*X-hY*Y contains points like (1,1,2), (2,3,13), 
(-1,2,5) since each of these satisfy the equation. Specifi- 
cally, the third coordinates are all obtained from the first 
two by using the rule Z = X*X-t-Y*Y. Such graphs are 
visualized as surfaces in three-dimensional space. 

Obviously we cannot draw the entire graph of a func- 
tion. Graph 3D sketches only portions of graphs. Figure 
1 depicts a typical situation. Along the X-axis we have 
the interval [AX,BX]. Along the Y-axis you'll see the in- 
terval [AY, BY]. Together these describe the rectangular 
region [AX,BX]x[AY,BY]. This consists of all pairs X,Y with 
AX< = X< = BX and AY<= Y<= BY. Above each spot in this 
region there is a point on the graph. The third coordinate 



GRAPH OF 

z = f(x,y) 



GRAPH OF 

Z = f(X,y) 




NX, NY = 4,3 



FIGURE 2 



48 



ANTIC, The Atari Resource 



Z is found by evaluating f(X,Y). It is also clear that we can't 
do this for every possible X,Y in the region. 

This is where the partition sizes NX, NY come into play. 
Figure 2 shows a 4,3 partitioning. With NX = 4 the inter- 
val [AX,BX] along the X-axis is broken into 4 equal pieces 
(subintervals). Whereas the Y-axis interval [AY, BY] is split 
into 3 subintervals. This leads to 20 spots of interest in 
the rectangular region. The function fpf ,Y) is then com- 
puted at each of these, resulting in 20 data points actually 
on the graph. We now connect these with line segments 
to get a rough idea of the shape of the graph. 

Larger values of NX, NY will give you a better looking 
picture but will take more time. Also, if you plot too many 
data points and joining line segments, your picture can 
quickly become cluttered. This is solved with the graphing 
options [O]. 

FUNCTIONS TO TRY 

To get you started here's a list of functions with suggested 
rectangular domain and eye location. When you build up 
the courage to try your own just be careful to avoid the 
"value error" trap. Be sure that the function you use is 
defined on the entire rectangular region. Graph 3D will 
accept each of the following examples. Use the menu 
selections [F], [I], and [E] to input the data. 

1. Z=1-2*X*X 

[-2,2]x[-1,1] eye:10,10,5 



2. z=x*x-i-2*y*y 

[-1,1]x[-1,1] eye:10,14 4 

3. Z=SIN(3*X) 
[-1,1]x[-1,1] eye;10,15,12 

4. Z=SQR(X*X+3*y*y) 
[-3,3]x[-1,1] eye:1 0,2,3 

5. z=EXP(-x*x-y*y) 

[-2,2]x[-1,1]eye:4,10,3 

6. z=4*x*x*x*x-4*x*x-i-y*y 

[-1,1]x[-1,1]eye:10,17,4 

7. z=i/(o.5-)-x*x-fy*y)-i/(o,5-i-x*x-H(y-2)*(y-2)) 

[-2,2]x[-2,4] eye:20,10,10 

z=cos(3*x*y) 

[-1,1]x[-2,2] eye:20,10,40 

EXP(SIN(X*y)) 
[-3,3]x[-3,3] eye:1 0,20,30 

z=x*x*x-f-2*y*y*y 

[-1,1]x[-1,1] eye:10,10,5 
You'll find the 3D graphs of some of these functions 
illustrating the article. If you create an impressive new 
function, be sure to send it to Antic as an I/O Board letter 
Paul Chabot, professor of mathematics and computer 
science at California State University, Los Angeles, 
returns to BASIC here after publishing ACTION! graphics 
programs in the April and June, 1985 issues of Antic. 

Listins on page 57 L^ 



8. 



10. 





.■'■' -i/^'TV" / '■, i''.— i^"^?V' / 'i I \ '. 1 






f-" 



U 



i> 



I.,-' 



-■ i * 



I ! : !.vr^r-i--.i. i i i 



iKi i 








October 1985 



49 



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LIBRARY 

A|NflC type-in listing section includes every full-length program 
from this issue. Listings are easier to type and proofread, easy to 
remove and save in a binder if you wish. 

► PLAY BLVEGRASS MUSIC LIMCE A BIONIC EARL SCRUGGS! 

BANJO PICKER 55 

► YOUR GURU, THE ATARI. . . 

YOGA BREATHING 56 

► SPECTACULAR THREE-DIMENSIONAL VISUALS! 

GRAPH 3D 57 

► TYPO II UPDATE 

MATH WIZARD 60 

► GAME OF THE MONTH 

ALIEN ASYLUM . 62 

► BONUS GAME 

LEMONADE 63 

► ASSEMBLY LANGUAGE 

FINE SCROLLING WORLD: PART II 64 

► CONVERT AN 8-BIT ATARI PROGRAM FOR THE ST 

GEM COLOR CASCADE 66 

TYPING SPECIAL ATARI CHARACTERS 52 

HOW TO USE TYPO II 53 ERROR FILE 53 

DISK SUBSCRIBERS: You can use all these programs immediately. 
Just follow the instructions in the accompanying magazine articles. 

No part ,of this publication may be reproduced, stored in a retrieval system, or transmitted, in any form or by any means, 
electronic, mechanical, photocopying, recording or otherwise, without the prior written permission of the publisher. 

Antic program listings are typeset on the Star's SG-10 printer— from Star Micronics, Inc., 200 Park Avenue, New York, 
NY 10166. 

OCTOBER 1985 ANTIC SOFTWARE LIBRARY • 51 



TYPING SPECIAL 
ATARI CHARACTERS 

Antic printed program listings leave a small space between each Atari Special Character for easier reading. Im- 
mediately below you will see the way Antic prints all the standard Atari letters and numbers, in upper and lower 
case, in normal and inverse video. 

ABCDEFGHIJKLMHOPQRSTUVUKVZ 

t^msQsasBioBiaiacmQiiiQiiiEiaiaracEGaaa 

abcdefghi jkl nnop<irs tuuwxyz 

EicaaBBGmraQnoDcmQiniEiiasQmraciQnB 

0123456789 mBSBaSISBUm 

The Atari Special Characters and the keys you must type in order to get them are shown in the two boxes below. 
(Squares are drawn around the normal video characters so you can see their positions more accurately, these squares 
will not appear in listings.) 





NORMAL VIDEO | 


FOR 


TYPE 




FOR 


TYPE 


THIS 


THIS 




THIS 


THIS 


m 


CTRL 


1 


m 


CTRL T 


m 


CTRL 


A 


s 


CTRL U 


a 


CTRL 


B 


c 


CTRL V 


E 


CTRL 


C 


H 


CTRL W 


m 


CTRL 


D 


a 


CTRL X 


ffi 


CTRL 


E 


K CTRL Y 1 





CTRL 


F 


a 


CTRL Z 


s 


CTRL 


G 


E 


ESC ESC 


a 


CTRL 


H 


m 


ESC CTRL - 


a 


CTRL 


I 


ffl 


ESC CTRL = 


B 


CTRL 


J 


B 


ESC CTRL + 


a 


CTRL 


K 


a 


ESC CTRL * 


B 


CTRL 


L 


m 


CTRL . 


H 


CTRL 


M 


m 


CTRL ; 


y 


CTRL 


N 


1 


SHIFT = 


■ B 


CTRL 





m 


ESC 


m 


CTRL 


P 




SHIFT 


s 


CTRL 


Q 




CLEAR 


H 


CTRL 


R 


a) 


ESC DELETE 


a 


CTRL 


S 


a 


ESC TAB 





INVERSE VIDEO | 


FOR 


TYPE 




FOR 


TYPE 


THIS 


THIS 




THIS 


THIS 


□ 


.kCTRL 


J 


U 


ACTRL Y 





ACTRL 


A 


D 


ACTRL Z 


B 


A CTRL 


B 


□ 


ESC 


B 


ACTRL 


C 




SHIFT 


D 


A CTRL 


D 




DELETE 


n 


ACTRL 


E 


E9 


ESC 


a 


ACTRL 


F 




SHIFT 


a 


ACTRL 


G 




INSERT 


n 


ACTRL 


H 


a 


ESC 


B 


ACTRL 


I 




CTRL 


a 


ACTRL 


J 




TAB 


B 


ACTRL 


K 


a 


ESC 


a 


ACTRL 


L 




SHIFT 


H 


ACTRL 


M 




TAB 


H 


ACTRL 


N 


a 


ACTRL . 


a 


ACTRL 





a 


ACTRL ; 


B 


ACTRL 


P 


B 


A SHI FT = 


B 


ACTRL 





□ 


ESC CTRL 2 


D 


ACTRL 


R 


□ 


ESC 


□ 


ACTRL 


S 




CTRL 


□ 


ACTRL 


T 




DELETE 


n 


ACTRL 


U 


□ 


ESC 


n 


ACTRL 


V 




CTRL 


□ 


ACTRL 


W 




INSERT 


H 


ACTRL 


X 







Whenever the CONTROL key (CTRL on the 400/800) or SHIFT key is used, hold it down while you press the 
next key. Whenever the ESC key is pressed, release it before you type the next key. 

Turn on inverse video by pressing the Reverse Video Mode Key Ql . Turn it off by pressing it a second time. 
(On the 400/800, use the Atari Logo Key^ instead.) Note: In the printed listings, inverse characters will be slightly 
smaller than the normal ones. 

Among the most common program typing mistakes are switching certain capital letters with their lower-case 
counterparts — you need to look especially carefully at P, X, O and (zero). 

Some of Atari Special Characters are not easy to tell apart from standard alpha-numeric characters. Usually the 
Special Characters will be thicker than the alpha-numerics. Compare the two sets of characters below: 



^ ^ CTRLF 


/ «a / 


"^ k? CTRL G 


V iB» SHIFT + 


— " CTRL N 


- B SHIFT - 


— = CTRL R 


- B - 


+ :: CTRL S 


* a + . 



OCTOBER 1985 



52 * ANTIC SOFTWARE LIBRARY 



HOW TO USE TYPO II 



TYPO II is the improved automatic proofreading program for Antic's type-in BASIC listings. It finds the exact 
line where you made a program typing mistake. 

Type in TYPO II and SAVE a copy to disl< or cassette. Now type GOTO 32000. When you see the instruction on 
the screen, type in a single program line without the two-letter TYPO II code at left of the line number. Press 
[RETURN]. 

Your line will reappear at the bottom of the screen with a two-letter TYPO II code on the left. If this code is not 
exactly the same as the line code printed in the magazine, you mistyped something in that line. 

To call back any line previously typed, type an asterisk [*] followed (without in-between spaces) by the line number, 
then press [RETURN]. When the complete line appears at the top of the screen, press [RETURN] again. This is also 
the way you use TYPO II to proofread itself. 

To LIST your program, press [BREAK] and type LIST. To return to TYPO II, type GOTO 32000. 

To remove TYPO II from your program, type LIST "D:FILENAME",0,31999 [RETURN] (Cassette owners LIST "C:). 
Type NEW, then ENTER "D:FILENAME" [RETURN] (Cassette— ENTER "C:). Your program is now in memory without 
TYPO II and you can SAVE or LIST it to disk or cassette. 

Owners of the BASIC XL cartridge from O.S.S. type SET 5,0 and SET 12,0 before using TYPO II. 



Don't type the 
TYPO H Codes! 



<:s. 



UB 32000 
UM 32010 
HS 32020 
5E «3 
BN 32030 
YC 32040 
EH 32050 

in 

HS 32060 
S:IF 
:GOT0 
»H 32070 
ESt2 
GOTO 
TH 3Z080 
MF 32O90 
NY 32100 
CN 32110 



Don't type the, 
TYPO II Codes! 

REH TYPO II BY ANDY BftRTON 

REM VER. l.O FOR ANTIC MAGAZINE 

CLR :DIM LINES C12ei : CLOSE tt2 : CLO 

OPEN ««2,4.0."E":0PEN «»3 . 5 , O- "E" 

? ••«": POSITION 11-1 :? "tSUEMMM" 

TRAP 3204O: POSITION 2.3:? "Type 
prosraM line" 

POSITION 1-4:? " ": INPUT *<2:LINE 
LIHES="" THEN POSITION 2,4:LIST B 

32060 

IF LINES tl.lJ="»" THEN B=UAL CLIN 
LENCLINESJl J :P0SITI0N 2. 
32060 

POSITION 2.10:? "CONT- 

B=UALtLINESl :POSITION 1, 

POKE 842,13:ST0P 

POKE 842,12 



^ 



. 4:LIST B: 



.3:? 



■ I ■■ ■ 



ET 32120 ? "h":POSITION 11.1:? 

"rPOSITION 2.15:LIST B 
CE 32130 C=0:ANS=C 
QH 32140 POSITION 2. 16: INPUT tt3: LINES: IF 

LINES="" THEN ? "LINE ";B;" DELETED" : G 

OTO 32050 
VV 32150 FOR D=l TO LEN CLINES) : C=C+1 : ANS= 

ANS^CCwASCCLINESCD.D})! :NEXT D 
WJ 32160 C0DE=INTCANS/676) 
JM 32170 CODE=ANS- tC0DE«676J 
EH 32180 HCODE=INT CCODE/261 
BH 32190 LC0DE=C0DE-CHC0DEw26I+65 
HB 32200 HC0DE=HC0DE+e5 
IE 32210 POSITION 0.16:? CHRS CHCODEl ; CHRS 

(LCODEl 
WG 32220 POSITION 2,13:? "If CODE does no 

t natch press KSOQEOI and ediX line a 

bove.":G0T0 32050 



y ERROR FILE 



GUESS THAT SONG 

July 1985 

The September, 1985 HELP! 
section contains an easier- 
reading listing of some of the 
touglier data lines in Guess 
That Song. 

MUSICIAN 

June 1985 
Change line 790 to: 

790 IF A=54 THEN 
POSITION 4.22:? »« 
6;"son3 cleared": 
GOTO 810 



MANEUVER 

April 1985 

If you get hearts on the 
title screen, LIST the pro- 
gram to disk or cassette, 
type NEW, then ENTER and 
SAVE it. 



FONT MAKER 
FOR SG-10 

March 1985 
The July 1985 issue of 
ANTIC contains a listing 
which, when merged with 
FONT MAKER, makes that 
program work on the Star 
SG-10. See the HELP sec- 
tion of that issue for 
instructions. 



KWIKDUMP 

March 1985 

The last number in line 
1070 should be 27 instead 
of zero. 

KOOKY'S QUEST 

Februaiy 1985 

The following line is 

missing: 

2100 FOR S = 32 TO 16 STEP 

-4: SOUND 0,S,14,10: EA = EA 

♦EA'EA: SOUND 0,0,0,0: EA = 1 

AO:NEXT S 

WIDE TEXT 

January 1985 
Substitute the following 



lines to print wide Z's. 
In assembly: 

eeae cpv «27» 

8 ;8 BYTES TO fl 

LETTER 
In BASIC: 

CT 20130 DATA 216 
, 208, 213, 185, O, 22 
4 

ADVENT X-5 

November 1984 

Missing line: 8020 RUN. 
Also, cassette owners 
should change the 138 In 
line 4005 to 130. The 
TYPO II code for line 1005 
isy. 



OCTOBER 1985 



ANTIC SOFTWARE LIBRARY * 53 



THE CMO ADVANTAGE SPECIAL PACKAGES 



SPECIALS 




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Subject to approval. 

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All prices shown are for 
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Call The Canadian Office 
for Canadian prices. 




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Atari 400 16K color computer, 
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$99.99 

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$39.00 

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$69.00 
NOTE 

All items sold "as is" with a 15 
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available for sale for the most part 
do not have instruction manuals 
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All items are in Limited Quantities. 



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(Minimum of 3) 



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AAB8039 EASTERN FRONT 

AABB030 E.T. 

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AAB4022 PAC MAN 

AAB4027 QIX 

AAB4008 SPACE INVADERS 

AAB4011 STAR RAIDERS 
AAB4008 SUPER BREAKOUT 

AAB401C 3-D TIC-TAC-TOE 

AAB8045 MUSIC COMPOSER 

AAB8045 PENGO 

AAB8029 FOOTBALL 

AAB8057 TYPO ATTACK 

AAB8033 ROBOTRON 

AAB8034 POLE POSITION 

AAB8042 TENNIS 

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(80 col. card)....S179.»» 

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Includes Basic, Self-teaching 
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Includes 410 Program Recorder, 
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Direct Modem 

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interface $59.09 




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(Pack of 10) 






play bluesrass music like a bionic Earl Scruggs 



BANJO PICKER 



Article on page 28 



LISTING 1 



HH 
QT 
FU 
ID 

NG 
AI 
JH 



LJ 

TM 
DB 
GT 
UK 
FH 
GO 
QB 
SW 
VH 
GI 
XU 



IB 

2e 

38 

48 

C16 

58 

68 

78 

: PO 

88 

4) : 

98 

4J : 

180 

C4) 

lie 

C4J 

128 

138 

148 

158 

168 

178 

188 

198 

288 

218 

228 

-2 : 



REH BA 
REM BV 
HEM tc 
DIM SC 
1 , AS C3 
GOTO 3 
REM PI 
PS=PK t 
KE STl 
F1 = N : K 
GOTO 1 
F2 = H : K 
GOTO 1 

F3 = M : 
: GOTO 

F4 = N : 



MJO P 
R . K . 
i 198 
t22) , 
81 . CN 
28 

CK RO 
PP , IJ 
.96:0 
= U5R C 
28 

= USR t 
28 

K = U5R 
120 
H = USR 



ICKER 
LIMDGR 
5, AMT 
PKCll. 
S C39J - 

UTINE 
: N = PL t 
N J GO 
U- Fl- C 

U. F2- C 

CU. F3 , 

CU , F4 , 



J=J*l:lF J>4 THE 
1=1+1 : IF I>PN TH 
FOR 11 = 1 TO U:NEK 
IF PEEKCSKEV) <>7 
REM START KEY. C 
POKE STl. 8 
H=PEEKC764) : IF K 
IF K>63 THEM K=L 
= KB CX} 
REM NEU CHORD 
IF 0>8 THEN LST= 
POSITION 14.0:? C 



Don't type the 
TYPO I! Codes! 



EN 

IC PUBLISHING 

8J .PLtl3,5J .SIMULS 

KB (631 



P.PSJ : ST1 = ST-48**PS 
TO 88 , 98 , 188. 118 
1 , F4 , C2 . F3. C3. F2. C 

1, Fl . C2, F4 . C3. F3. C 

C1.F2,C2-F1.C3.F4. 

C1.F3.C2.F2.C3.fi. 

N J = l 
EN 1 = 1 
T X 

THEN 270 
HECK KEYBOARD 

=UST THEN 70 
ST : GOTO 70 



:<:& 



K:P=Q:P2=P»3:P1=P2 
NS tPl . P2J : GOTO 188 



BA 230 REM NEM PICK PATTERN 

FU 248 IF a<0 THEN L S T = X : P P = - O : P OS I T 10 N 2 

7,0:? PP;" '■:G0T0 180 
RV 258 GOTO 70 

NI 260 REM CHECK OPTION « SELECT 
YO 270 IF PEEKCSKEVJ=3 THEN M= INT CU/'2 J +1 : 

GOTO 178 
CT 288 IF PEEKtSKEVJ=5 THEM U=U*5:GOT0 17 


HN 290 IF PEEKfSKEVJ=6 THEN FOR 11=8 TO 3 

:SOUND II . 8. 8 , : NEXT II:P0KE STl.e:GOT 

O 640 
OH 300 GOTO 170 
MM 310 REM INITIALIZATION 
DJ 328 GRAPHICS 8:P0KE 752.1:? '• CTun 

ing. please waitj" 
BT 330 POKE 710.4:POKE 712.4:P0KE 789.2 
AF 340 POSITION 6.2:POKE 82.6 
LP 350 FOB 1=1 TO 7:READ AS:? ASt2):NEXT 

I 
GA 360 ? :? "PRESS BHODBCa TO SPEED UP":? 

"PRESS BSaBBa TO SLOU DO UN" 
ID 378 ? "PRESS BDHEinB TO START « STOP" 
ON 380 REM READ SOUND POKE ROUTINE 
DO 398 FOR 1=1 TO 16:READ X : 5 I MU L S C I J = CHH 

S CKJ : NEXT I 
RE 400 REM READ SOUND PARAMETERS 
GO 410 FOR 1=1 TO 22:READ X : S C t I J = X : NEX T 

I 
AR 428 FOR 1 = 1 TO 6 3 : KB C 1 1 = 8 : NEX T I 
CB 438 REM READ CHORDS 
CY 448 CNS=" ":CNSt39)=" " : C N S t 2 ) =C M S : R E A 

D CC 
SP 450 FOR 1=1 TO CC:READ X : KB t X J = I : F OH J 

=1 TO 5:READ X : P L t I . J J = S C t X J : N EXT J:RE 

AD AS 
QY 460 Pl=I»3-2 : CNS CPl- Pl+LEN CASJ -IJ =AS : M 

EXT I 
LU 478 KB C47J =2 : KB t63J =5 : KB C23J =8 

OCTOBER 1985 



MP 
ZW 



MU 
LP 

MR 
AO 

ZL 

NU 

ZO 

LY 
BC 
MM 
EB 

MX 

CL 
LG 

WY 
UI 
MC 
MX 
ZU 
OM 
EG 
TE 
SE 
FP 
ZQ 
XZ 
YU 
HH 

UG 
LD 
EM 

PF 
IR 
GU 
IT 
S J 
OU 
MO 
JB 
UB 
IM 
LU 
ZC 
CY 
ST 
PQ 
LT 
IG 
HZ 
EM 
JZ 
HB 
GO 



488 REM READ PICK 
498 READ FP:FOH 1= 
=-I : FOR J=l TO 8 : R 

J : NEXT I 
588 REM DISPLAY CH 
518 POKE 82.2:? : ? 

QOcacaHQi^aaaajiiiBB ■ ■ 

520 POKE 718,14:PO 



PATTERNS 

1 TO PP:READ X:KBtXl 

EAD X : PKCI . JJ =X : NEXT 

ORD NAMES 

" BClElQiaSB ' 



538 


? 


: ? "a 


B" 






540 


? 


CNS CI 


CD 


a 


W Q' 


550 


? 


" 



KE 712.14 



a 



m B 



12J 



" "; CHS C13. 15J ;c 

560 ? :? " ";CN5 

REM DON'T FORGET T 

578 Cl=167 : C2=164 : 

588 P=S : PP=1 : M=188 

598 P2=P»3 : Pl=P2-2 

688 U=ADR CSIMULS] : 
LST=255:SKEY=53279 

618 POSITION 7.8 

j;" otaDOtKamH ";pp 

620 ST=PEEKC568J *2 
638 REM MAIT FOR S 



;CNS(4.6) ;CNSC13.211 
H G3 a" : ? 
NS (22 . 38) 

C22.24) ;CNS(31.393 ; : 
HIS SEMI-COLON 
C3=162 : C4=161 

: PN = 8 
Fl=8:F2=8:F3=8:F4=e: 



? "aoBiaaH ";cns(pi.p2 



5 6»PEEKC561J*356 
TART KEY OFF THEN ON 



648 

658 

668 

678 

680 

698 

788 

718 

728 

738 

748 

758 

768 

778 

.8.2 

788 

798 

800 

88. 1 

810 

820 

830 

848 

858 

868 

878 

880 

890 

988 

910 

920 

930 

940 

950 

960 

978 

988 

990 

1OO0 

1018 

1820 



IF P 
IF P 
FOR 
POKE 
1 = 1 : 
DATA 
DATA 
DATA 
DATA 
DATA 
DATA 
DATA 
REM 
DATA 
10. 2 
REM 
DATA 
DATA 
82. 9 
REM 
DATA 
DATA 
DATA 
DATA 
DATA 
DATA 
DATA 
DATA 
DATA 
DATA 
DATA 
DATA 
DATA 
DATA 
REM 
DATA 
DATA 
DATA 
DAT 
DAT 
DAT 



EEK CSKE 
EEKCSKE 
X = l TO 

SKEY. 8 
J=l : GOT 



YJ <> 7 THEM 
Y) <>6 THEN 
25 : NEXT X 

O 70 



648 
650 



■+- 
■+- 



I 1 — + — I — 4 Banjo I 

I 1 h— 4- — I Picker I 



SOUND P 

184.13 

32.228, 

SOUND F 

243.23 

162.15 

6.91.85 

CHORD D 

13 

31.18. 



OKE ROUTINE 

3.203,162,0,104,104 

203, 208 ,246,96 

REQ. VALUES 

8,217.204,193,182,173 

3. 144. 136. 128. 121, 114 

,81,76,72 

ATA 



157 



30, 
26. 



17, 
18 , 



24,17, 
46,15, 
42,15, 
40,17, 



62 , 

SB , 

56 , 

22 . 

18 , 

16 , 



19, 
17 , 
19 , 
17 , 
17 , 
19 , 



PICK PA 
11 

51.3.2 

53.3.2 

A 48.3, 

A 58.3, 

A 11.3. 



13. 
13, 

12 , 

13 , 

12 . 

13 , 
12 , 
15 , 

14 , 

15 , 

14 , 

15 , 
14 , 
TIE 



18, 6. 28, F 
8. 5 . 28 . C 
8.3.20,67 
10. 5 . 28 , An 
8 , 3 , 20 , G 
10,3,20,07 
8 , 5 , 28 , EM 
18 , 7 , 28 , D 



18 
12 
18 
12 



5 

7 

S 

5 

18,7,22 
RMS 



28 , A7 
22 , BM 



22 , 
22 . 



A 

E7 

Ft»r 



-5,1,4.2,5,1 

,1,5.1,2,3,1 

1.5,3,1,3.4.1 

2.1,5,3.1.5,1 

1,5.3.1.5.3.1 

continued on next page 
ANTIC SOFTWARE LIBRARY • 55 



GJ 1030 DftTfl 13.2,1.2.1,5.2.1.5 
JP 1O40 0«T« 8.1.2,3.1.5.2.1.5 
EH 1OS0 DATA 10.1.2.5.1,2.5,2,1 



FG 1060 DATA 1.1, 
MH 1070 DATA 5,3. 
CJ 1080 DATA 0,2, 



2,1.5,1,2,1,5 
5,3,1,5.3.1.5 
3,2,1,2,3,2,1 



your suru, the Atari 



YOGA BREATHING 



Article on pase 44 



I 



LISTING 1 



Don't type the 
TYPO II Codes! 



<:s. 



HU 
UT 
FD 
VI 
KG 
VN 
ZS 

LR 

FR 

YE 
XB 

UG 
QZ 

KR 
FY 
OX 
IC 

QX 



YM 
TC 

RK 

BG 

EG 

FM 

TG 
LJ 

XL 
TU 
SK 

OM 
LZ 
ZN 

XY 
ML 
SQ 
EZ 

SO 
FJ 
OU 
NZ 
UC 
KG 
JQ 
ML 
RJ 



1 REM BREATHE 

2 REM BY LEN DORFMAN AND JERRY HHITE 

3 REM CCI 1985. ANTIC PUBLISHING 
10 GOSUB 7000:GOTO 100 

38 REM ONE SECOND SUBROUTINE 

40 IF SFLG THEN SOUND 0. PITCH, 2. 8 

SO POKE 709. 15 : POSITION 6.21:? n6;PHAS 

E$:REM unite COMMAND DISPLAY 

60 SOUND O,0,0.O:FOR TICK=1 TO SECS:PO 

KE 540,59:REM APPROX 1 SEC COUNTDOUN 

62 IF TICKOSECS THEN 70:REM HOT LAST 

SEC 

64 UAIT=PEEKtS401 : IF UAIT>15 THEN 64 

66 POKE 709,UAIT:IF UAIT THEN 64:REM F 

ADE COMMAND COLOR 

68 NEXT TICK:RETURN 

70 IF PEEKt540] THEN 70:REM COUNTDOUN 

INCOMPLETE SO LOOP HERE 

80 GOTO 68:REM DO IT AGAIN 

95 REM RESET DISPLAY 

108 OFS=ia: OLO=10 : POKE DL*ia,7 

102 REM RESET COLORS AND TURN ON SCREE 

N 

105 POKE 712.160:POKE 710.156:POKE 709 

.160:POKE 708.28:POKE 711,188:P0KE 559 

, 34 

108 REM JOYSTICK UPDATE 

110 JS=STICKC0J : IF NOT STRIGC0) THEN 

800:REM TRIGGER PRESSED 

115 IF JS=1S THEN 110:REM NOTHING TO D 

O 

120 IF JS=13 THEN OLD= OF S : OF S =0F S* 3 : IF 

0FS=25 THEN OFS=10:BEM STICK DOUN 
140 IF JS = 14 THEN OLD = F S : O F S = O F S - 3 : I F 

0FS=7 THEN 0FS=22:REM STICK UP 

160 IF JS07 AND JSOll THEN 3O0:REM S 

TICK NOT LEFT OR RIGHT 

170 B$=" "IREM CLEAR MORK STRING 

180 IF JS = 7 THEN GOTO 50O«^OFS:REM STIC 

K RIGHT 

200 GOTO 600+OFS:REM JS=11 STICK LEFT 

250 RE.M SCREEN UPDATE AND NOISE 

300 POKE DL+OLD. 6 : POKE DL*0FS.7:REM OL 

D LINE SMALL. NEU LINE BIG 

350 REM AUDIO FEEDBACK « DELAY 

408 SOUND 0. 0FS**2 . 18. 8 : JIF = 20 

405 POKE 540. JIF : SOUND 1 . . 8 . O : SOUND 

.0.0.0 

410 IF PEEKtS40J THEN 410 

415 GOTO llO 

420 REM ERROR NOISE 

430 FOR W0L=15 TO STEP -0.5:S0UND 0. 

102. 12. VOL : SOUND 1 . 51 , 1 2 , VOL : NEXT VOL 

440 JIF=30:GOTO 485 

580 REM VALIDITY CHECK « UPDATE 

518 IF SSC12,14J=" ON" THEN 430 
511 SSC12,14J=" 0N":G0T0 708 

513 IF C0UNT=9 9 THEN 430 

514 C0UNT=C0UNT+1 : GOTO 713 

516 IF INHALE=6e THEN 430 

517 INHALE=INHALE«1 : GOTO 716 

519 IF RETAIN=60 THEN 438 



OK 


LM 


XM 


JU 


FN 


PA 


LN 


AU 


KU 


LZ 


PV 


DU 


YX 


CT 


BC 


FQ 


CX 


CS 


YI 


YV 


YD 


KZ 


NT 


YB 


XJ 


RY 


AK 


MX 


CP 


LP 


ZV 


KX 


ZT 


UG 


TS 


KE 


PE 


TO 


NK 


OK 


YZ 



520 

522 

523 

610 

611 

613 

614 

616 

617 

619 

620 

622 

623 

788 

718 

713 

CB5J : 

716 S 

LEN (B 

719 S 

LEN CB 

722 S 

LENCB 

790 R 

800 P 

SMALL 

881 S 
= 1 : RE 

882 P 
, 164 

883 R 

884 F 
TIME* 

885 R 

886 P 
14-LB 

809 R 

810 I 
S = INH 
828 I 
S = RET 
838 I 
S = EXH 
898 N 
988 G 
EN » 
1880 
7000 

7100 
= ADR 
7200 
7308 
E TEX 
8088 
C2J =S 
8018 

CURR 
8828 
STRIN 



ETAIN= 
F EXHA 
XHALE= 
F SS CI 
S C12, 1 
F COUN 
OUNT=:C 
F HOT 
NHALE= 
F NOT 
ETAIN= 
F HOT 
XHALE= 
OSUB 9 
EM UPD 
S C73 . 7 
SS C7S- 
S tl33, 
5) : SS C 
S C193. 
SJ : SS t 
S 1253, 
SJ : SS C 
EM SET 
OKE DL 



RETAIN 
LE = 6e 
EXHALE 
2, 14J = 
4J ="0F 
T = l TH 
OUMT-1 

IHHAL 
INHALE 

HETAI 
RETAIN 

EXHAL 
EXHALE 
00O : GO 
ATE SC 
4J =BS : 
LB, 74J 
134 J =8 
135-LB 
194 J =B 
195-LB 
254J =B 
255-LB 
UP FOR 
♦OFS. 6 



♦1 
TH 
♦1 
"O 
F" 
EN 
: G 
E 

-1 
N 

-1 
E 

-1 
TO 
RE 
BS 
= B 
S : 
, 1 
S : 
. 1 
S : 
. 2 
B 
: R 



: GO 
EN 
: GO 
FF" 
: GO 

43 
OTO 
THE 
: GO 
THE 
: GO 
THE 
: GO 

40 
EN 
= ST 
S : G 
BS = 
34 J 
BS = 
94J 
BS = 
54J 
REA 
EM 



TO 
43 
TO 

T 
TO 
O 

7 
N 

TO 
N 

TO 
N 

TO 
5 

ST 
RS 
OT 
ST 
= B 
ST 
= B 
ST 
= B 
TH 
MA 



719 
O 

722 
HEN 438 

708 

13 
430 

716 
430 

719 
430 

722 

RING SS 

tCOUNT) : LB=LEN 

O 708 

RS CINHALEI : LB = 

S : GOTO 780 

RS CRETAIN) : LB = 

S:GOTO 700 

RS CEXHALEl : LB = 

S : GOTO 700 

CYCLE 
KE LARGE LINE 



FLG=0:IF SS 
M SET SOUND 
OKE 711.164 
POKE 712,8: 
EM BREATH C 
OR TIME=1 T 
1) : LB = LEN CB 
EM UPDATE C 
OSITION 11, 
, 8 : ? t<6; BS; 
EM PHASES=C 
F INHALE TH 
ALE : PITCH=0 
F RETAIN TH 
AIH : PITCH=1 
F EXHALE TH 
ALE : PITCH=2 
EXT TIME:OF 
OSUB 9a0O:G 
START OVER 
REM INITIAL 
GRAPHICS 17 

DL=PEEKC560 
OF DISPLAY 
OFS=18 : REM 
POKE DL*6.7 
T LINES 
DIM SSC254) 
S:REM SCREE 
DIM PHASESC 
ENT PHASE O 
DIM BS C2] : B 
G 



56 • ANTIC SOFTWARE UBRARY 



C13, 14J ="0N" THEN SFLG 
FLAG 

:POKE 7ie.l64:P0KE 788 
REM RESET COLORS 
YCLE LOOP 

COUNT : BS=STRS CCOUNT- 
SI 

OUNT DISPLAY 

8:? «»6;" •■;:POSITIOH 

OMMAND 

EN PHASES="1 nhale" : SEC 

:GOSUB 48 

EN PHASES="retain" : SEC 

:GOSUB 48 

EN PHASES="exha le" : SEC 

:G0SUB 40 

S = 18 

OTO 100:REM RESET SCRE 

IZATION 

:POKE 559,0:? t»6 : ? 06; 

1 '•'PEEK C561IW256 : REM DL 
LIST 

OFFSET TO DL LINE 
:POKE DL*26,7:REM LARG 

:SS = " " : SS C2S4 J =■■ ••:SS 
N OPTION DISPLAY 
6J:PHASES = " •■:REM 

R COMMAND 
S = " ■•:REM blank MORK 



continued on next pase 
OCTOBER 1985 



PARTS/SERVICE FOR ATARI COMPUTERS 

FLAT SERVICE RATES BELOW INCLUDE PARTS AND LABOR 
60 DAY WARRANTY 

800 Computer Repair $65.00 800XL Computer Repair $67.50 

400 Computer Repair $47.50 810 Disl( Drive Repair $79.50 

600XL Computer Repair $65.00 850 Interface Repair $60.00 

I200XL Computer R^air $65.00 1050 Disl( Drive Repair $85.00 

Above units repaired or exchanged witti rebuildable ©(Change. 
Include $7.00 return shipping and insurance. 

INTEGRATED 



Custom 810 Disk Drive ... SI49.50 
400 Computer-Complete . . . $39.50 
410 Data Recorder ... $28.50 
800XL7600XL Power Supply . . . $35.00 

I6K EPROM Board . . . $8.50 

8K EPROM Board . . . $7.50 

4K EPROM Board . . . $5.50 
Cartridge Case . . . $150 

MISC. 

810 Rear Board/Analog Board Upgrade . 



CIRCUITS 

GTIA Cllip C0I4805 

upgrade with instructions ... SI 1.50 

I OK rev. "B" O.S. Upgrade . . . 

3 chip rem set with instructions . . . 512.50 
PolteyChip ... C0I2294 .. . $8.50 
Antic Chip ., , C0I2296 ... $10.00 
PIAChip . .. C0I4795 ,. . $11.00 
CPU Chip ., COI4806 ,. , $12.50 
Basic ROM set . . . $15.00 

MODULES/CIRCUIT 

BOARDS.. .complete with IC's 

I6K Ram Memory Module . , 

CX853 ... SI8.S0 

800 lOK Rev. 'B" OS Module . $18 50 

800/400 CPU Board with GTIA . . . 522.50 

800 Main Board , $28.50 

400 Main Board . . , $26.50 

400 Main Board W.'O IC'S . , . $8.50 

800 Power SuppI/ Board . , $10,50 

810 Data Separator Board 

upgrade with instructions . . . S25.00 

810 Side Board W/O 5ep. 4 1771 , , $43.50 

810 Rear Power Board . $25.00 

810 Analog Board .. . $16 00 

AMERICAN TV 

Mail Order & Repair Address . . .- I533B Inverness St., San Leandro, CA 94579. 

Retail Store 1988 Washington Ave., San Leandro, CA 94577. 

Terms: We accept money orders, personal checks or COD VISAMastemard OK on orders over 

$25,00, No personal ched(S on COD. 

Shipping S4,00 Shipping and handling on orders under $150.00. Add $2.00 for COD orders. CA 

res include 6-1/2% sales lax. Overseas shipping extra. 

Prices subjea to change without notice. We reserve the right to limit quantities. Sales limited to 

slock un hand Much Morel Send SASE for free price list. 

Repair and upgrade services available Call, "Atari is a registered trademark of Alan, Inc. 



with 10 pin jumper and instructions 
Editor Assembler . . 525.00 

Basic Cartridge W/O Ose. Manual . 
810 Board Set ... $99,50 
810 Mech , . . $75.00 
Replacement power transformer . 
Sams Repair Manual 

for 800 or 400 .. . $19.95 EA 
800 Keyboard Repair . . . $35.00 
DeRe AUri ... 512.50 



PHONE 41 5-3S2-3787 



$39,50 
$23.50 

$16.50 



SOUTMERM SOF^TW#^F*E 

DIVISION OF SOUTHERN SUPPLY CO. 

1879 Ruffn«r Rd. Blrnlnoham, AL 35210 

PHONE 30^ — ♦FSA— 0«ySA 

BEND SELF ADDRESSED STAMPED ENVELOPE FOR 

OUR TOP SO SPECIAL SHEET UPDATED EVERY HEEK 



MX THIRD PARTY TITLES.... SOX OFF 

H«r»F*Y EMH«IMCEMENT 

810 ENmNCEHENT ...«I9T.99 

1030 EMInNCEHENT 137.93 

J030 CONTROLLER 37. 93 

ANnLDS UPBRADE 47.79 

HARP DOS XL CALL 

OTHER mPPY PRODUCTS CALL 

«Xl-CJM R«MP-ai«IER 

i2BK RnM DISK 237.73 

4BK RAMPOHER 77.73 

32K RAtPtlMER 97.7S 

XOD INC. 

BPARTA DOS 34.73 

im DOUBLER 37.73 

CHIP FOR BIO 87.73 

HAPPY ARCHIVER 47. 73 

R-TIHE CARTRIDSE «7.79 

»EH PRODUCTS CALL 



lOSO DISK DRIVE 137.73 

1030 M/HrtPPY INSTALLED..... 377. 73 

LIBHT PEN 47.73 

NUIIERIC KEY PAD 37.73 

TOUCH TABLET 49.73 

eooXL 77.73 

gZOBT 977.73 

SOOK FLOPPY OnlVE 177.79 

ISH8 HARD DRIVE CALL 

830 INTERFACE 107.73 

130XE IZBK 197.79 

830 HODEM 97.79 

MIOC:. MEFtC^IHAND X BE 

PRINTERS (MOST BRANDS) CALL 

MODEHg CALL 

BONY PRODUCTS CALL 

MONI T0R9 CALL 

DB/DD LIFETIME DISKS ISO).. .77.79 

PRINTER INTERFACES CALL 

DISK DRIVES CALL 

OHNIVIEH CALL 



ALL PRICES ARE FOR HAIL ORDERS ONLY. ADD lOX FOR C.O.D. AND I3X FDR 
CREDIT CARD ORDERS. DEALER INQUIRIES HELCOHE. BEND FOR OUR FREE 
BROCHURE AND PRICE LIST. ADD *3 FOR BHIPPINB, HANDLINB AND INSURANCE. 
FDREIBN ORDERS MELCOME HITH SUFFICIENT POSTAQE INCLUDED. MOBI ORDERS 
RECEIVED BEFORE NOON FILLED SAME DAY. ADO •9 FOR SHIPHENT BY AIR 



80i-i~rME:F%N sof="riHiAF%E: 

DIVISION OF SOUTHERN SUPPLY CO. 
1879 Ruf-fner Rd. Birmingham, AL 3S210 
PHONE 320ES— •yS4t.— 0«1?e<£> 
SEND SELF ADDRESSED STAMPED ENVELOPE FOR 
OUR TOP SO SPECIAL SHEET UPDATED EVERY NEEK 



YOGA BREATHING 



Don't type the^^s^^ 
continued rypo n Coc'esl \^ 



H5 aiea ss C6. i4] ="BHtDmEi on- 

ZH 8118 SS t66, 74J ="HraCDmB l":COUNT = l 

LK 8129 SS tl26. IS'IJ ="Hnn(aBnEl 1":IMH«LE = 1 

ftF 8138 SS C186, 194J ="[BBDEIB[B B":RETflIM = e 



ftK 8140 SS C246. 254 J ="t3ntaBni3 1":EKH«LE = 1 

KN 8988 REM D ISPL A V/^SOUND SUBROUTINE 

UM 9888 SOUND 8 . COFS-18 J /3 , 2 - 1 : POS I T ION 8 

,5:? «6;SS;:S0UND 8 . 8 , 8 , 8 : JIF =8 : HE T URN 



spectacular three-dimensional visuals 



GRAPH 3-D 



Article on page 46 



LISTING 1 



Don't type the 
TyPO II Codes' 



iO. 



GG 18 

CX 28 

FU 38 

KQ 48 



TF 
DY 
KD 
KV 

SO 



58 
68 
78 
88 

6 

98 

184 



REM GRAPH 3-D LOADER 

REM BY PAUL CHABOT 

REM tc) 1985, ANTIC PUBLISHING 

GOSUB 298 : LBL=1536 : 10=1784 

FOR 1=1536 TO 1758 

READ X : POKE I,H:NEKT I 

RUN "D : GRAPH3D ■ BAS" 

REM PRINT TEXT IN GR.8. LOAD AT 153 



DATA 
. 282, 



184, 281. 4. 248, 
288 



9. 178. 248.5.184. 



OCTOBER 1985 



DB 180 DATA 251.96,184.133,215.184.133.21 

4. 104-184. 168. 184 
TY 110 DATA 133,217,184.133,216,184,104,2 

40, 236, 133, 212. 24 
WN 120 DATA 165.214,181,88,133,214,165,89 

,181- 215, 133, 215 
MY 138 DATA 15 2,248,15,165,214,185,64,133 

, 214, 165, 215, 185 
MU 148 DATA 1,13 3,215,136,288,241,132,221 

, 168- 8, 132 , 228 

continued on next page 

ANTIC SOFTWARE LIBRARY * 57 



ML 158 OftTft 177,216.168.8.178,16,1.136-15 

2. 213. 138. 41 
CG 158 DftTft 96,288.4,169,64,16,14,281.32, 

288, 4,169 
ZR 178 DATA 8,16,6,281,64,288,2,169,32,13 

3, 218, 138 
IL 188 DATA 41,31,5,218,133,218,169,8,162 

.3.6. 218 
DI 198 DATA 4 2,282,288,258,189,244,2,133. 

219, 164 . 221, 177 
EG 288 DATA 218,69,213,164,228,145,214,28 

8, 132, 228, 196. 212 
AL 218 DATA 288.182.24.155,214.185,48,133 

. 214 ,144,2, 238 
WY 228 DATA 215,238,221,169.8,197,221,288 

, 159 ,96,287,96 
WC 238 REM BVTE I/B , L8AD AT 1784 
NA 248 DATA 16 9,54,133,212,169,3,133,213. 

184 , 184 
MF 258 DATA 184,18,18,18,18,178,216,24,18 

5 , 9 
EL 268 DATA 16 8,184,145,212,136.184,145,2 

12, 135, 136 
CI 278 DATA 136,184,145,212,136,184.145,2 

12, 136, 136 
KT 288 DATA 184,184,145,212,76,86,228 
UU 298 GRAPHICS 2:P0KE 712,176:P0KE 718.1 

76:PBKE 752,1 
ID 388 PeSITIBM 3.1 
KL 318 ? ««6;"t?l R B P CB 3 ta- 
KR 328 POSITIOM 4.4 
SF 338 ? »t6;"paul chabot" 
MF 348 ? :? : ? " Ccj 1985. Antic publi 

Shi ng" : RETURN 



LISTING 2 



UQ 
CK 
FU 
EI 

IG 
RF 
BR 
ZD 
VJ 
MH 
PF 
VK 
CP 
IH 
OK 
FC 
UD 
SZ 
WP 
QH 
ZK 
ZC 
YE 
AL 
KI 
SQ 
OZ 
HB 
PM 
OH 
KE 
SI 
ZK 
RI 
VE 
KH 
HH 
UI 



18 R 

28 R 

38 R 

35 I 

LOAD 

48 G 

188 

128 

138 

158 

152 

154 

156 

158 

168 

162 

164 

166 

168 

178 

172 

174 

288 

282 

284 

212 

214 

216 

218 

224 

226 

228 

238 

232 

388 

382 

384 

386 

318 



EM GRAPH 
EM BY PA 
EM tc] 1 
F PEEKCl 
- BAS" 
OTO 2888 
REM •»»«» 
Z=H»H-Y» 
RETURN 
REM »<»»»*» 
QK=aH-FK 
SK=aK»Al 
SY=QH«A4 
SZ=QK«A7 
K=ED-SZ: 
T= CM»EDI 
SK = T*«SK* 
IF SK<8 
IF SK>31 
IF SY<8 
IF SY>19 
RETURN 
REM »*»»» 
TRAP 888 
? •■ CO MP 
DK= (BK-A 
K=AH-D« : 
FOR 1=8 
FOR J=8 
PK tl. JJ = 
C=C*2 : IF 
POKE 788 
POKE 788 
RETURN 
REM *»*»*»» 
IF C F = 1 
GRAPHICS 
CF=e : GOS 
IF GF=1 



3-D. LISTING 2 
UL CHABOT 

985, ANTIC PUBLISHING 
536)0184 THEN RUN "D:GR3D 



THE 
Y/2 

FIND 
: QV = Q 
♦QY*A 
♦QY»A 
♦OY«A 
IF K< 
/€«♦« 
CK: SV 
THEN 
9 THE 
THEN 
1 THE 

CO MP 
: POSI 
UTING 
K),^NK 
C = 132 
TO NK 
TO NY 
K : PY C 

C> 25 
, C : NE 
, 132 

GRAP 
THEN 

24 : G 
UB 11 
THEN 



FUNCTION *n«-***i-*n**n*-*n#-i* 



SK,5Y ■»€■»■»**«■■»■»***■•***■**■>«■**** 
Y-FV : OZ=az-FZ 
2 + QZ*«A3 
5*QZ»A6 
8*QZ»A9 
1 THEN X=l 
) 

= CY-T*fSY 
SH = e 

N SK=319 
SY = 8 
N SY=191 

UTE POINTS *»-W'W«»-M->«-««-MM- 
TION 21.14 

POINTS " 
: DV= CBY-AYl^'NY 

: M=K*DK : V=AV-DY 
: Y=Y+DY : GOSUB 188 
I , JJ =Y : PZtl , JJ =Z 
5 THEN C=8 
KT J : NEKT I 



H IT ^^^^-S^^t-M^^-tt-MM-MW-^^M-MM- 

GOSUB 288:G0SUB 488 
OSUB 1S68:COLOR 1 
88 : SI=1 : S J=l 
S J = NY 



UK 


EN 


EL 


TO 


LT 


MH 


TN 


QK 


IZ 


WY 


MH 


01 


SP 


QZ 


IT 


KH 


GQ 


QZ 


YG 


TZ 


NI 


RN 


MA 


LF 


NK 


PU 


YO 


MI 


GK 


SE 


MA 


MS 


MD 


WO 


PT 


TB 


AY 


HA 


ZU 


JU 


MG 


ZW 


CJ 


TO 


FO 


TR 


TM 


ZZ 


UE 


CW 


EJ 


CG 


KO 


AP 


QL 


TS 


JB 


CL 


UV 


TM 


QC 


LP 


OC 


PJ 


IC 


RC 


EK 


OA 


BC 


UK 


CO 


OY 


JK 


QM 


PK 


EQ 


LD 


EE 



312 

314 

315 

318 

329 

338 

332 

334 

336 

338 

339 

348 

342 

344 

345 

348 

358 

488 

482 

484 

486 

488 

418 

412 

414 

416 

418 

428 

422 

38 

424 

: GOT 

425 

438 

432 

434 

435 

438 

448 

442 

444 

488 

482 

484 

486 

588 

582 

584 

585 

588 

528 

522 

524 

558 

552 

554 

556 

558 

568 

688 

682 

684 

686 

688 

618 

628 

622 

624 

626 

628 

638 

632 

634 

636 

658 

652 

654 

656 

658 

788 



IF GF=2 
IF GF=3 
IF GF=4 
IF GF=5 
REM PERP 
FOR 1=8 
FOR J=8 
QY=PY (I, 
IF J=e T 
DRAMTO S 
REM PERP 
FOR J=8 
FOR 1=8 
OV = PV tl , 
IF 1=8 T 
DRAMTO S 
GOSUB 11 
REM «nnn» 
TRAP 888 
? •■ fix 
K= CAK^BK 
GOSUB 18 
FK=K : FY= 
A7=EK-FK 
ED = SQR CE 
A7 = A7/'ED 
A5=A7»A7 
IF A5=8 
IF A9=8 



THE 
THE 
THE 
THE 
T 
TO 
TO 
JJ : 
HEN 
K, S 
T 
TO 
TO 
JJ : 
HEN 
K. S 
88 : 
FI 

: PO 
i n3 
J/2 
8 
Y : F 

: A8 
K«E 

: A8 
*A8 
THE 
THE 



N S 
N S 
N S 
N S 
O K 
NK 
NY : 
QZ = 
PL 

Y : N 
O Y 
NY 
NK : 
QZ = 

PL 

Y : N 
RET 
K M 
SIT 

n 
■■ Y = 



I = N 

J = 3 

1 = 3 

1 = 3 

-AK 

STE 

QK = 

PZ t 

OT 

EKT 

-AK 

STE 

QK = 

PZt 

OT 

EKT 

URN 

ATR 

ION 

atr 

CAY 



: S 

IS 

P 

PK 

I . 

SK 

J 
IS 
P 

PK 
I. 
SK 

I 



J = 3 

SI 

CI. JJ 

JJ : GOSUB 158 

. SV 

:NEKT I 

5J 

CI. JJ 

JJ : GOSUB 158 

. SY 

:NEKT J 



I K ■»»«« 

21. 14 
i X " 
♦BVl/2 



Z=Z 

=EV-FY: A9=EZ-FZ 

K*EY»EV*EZ»EZJ 

= A8/'ED:A9 = A9/ED 

»A8 

N A4=8 : A5=l : GOTO 438 

N A4=8 : A5=8 : A6=l : GOTO 4 



THEN A4 = A7 : A5 = A8 : A6 = -A6,^A9 



WA6J 
A6/'KK 
*»A3J 
A3/KK 



FLAG 
THEN 
GF : RE 



IF A9<8 

O 438 

A4=-A7:A5=-A8:A5 

Al=A5«A9-ft5»A8 

A2 = A6»A7-A4*»A9 

A3=A4»A8-A5«A7 

KK=SQR CA4»A4*A5»A5* A6 

A4 = A4/^KK:A5 = A5/KK:A5 

KX = SaR C A1»A1*A2*»A2* A3 

A1=A1/KK:A2=A2/KK:A3= 

RETURN 

REM »»»» INPUT=CRETUR 

IF PEEKC764J =255 THEN 

IF PEEKC764J012 THEN 

POKE 754.255:P0P :RET 

REM inn»« MAG CHANGE » 

? ■■■■CEJEIQlBDaiaElDanili]" : ? 

? •' MnG = ";M;" XN 

GOSUB 488:INPUT M:GOS 

RETURN 

HEM »«*"» OPTION 

GF=GF*l:IF GF>5 

POSITION 13.3:? 

REM *««»« EYE CHANGE » 

? ■•■■OmSHHHaOlCBraDaBE:]" : 

? ES;" EK,EY,EZ" 

? BLS C28J ; "INPUT " ; : G 

INPUT EK, EY, EZ: GOSUB 

GOSUB 488:RETURN 

REM »»»» INTERVAL CHA 

? " ■■■BlilDBiatSBDa" : ? 

? IS; ■■ AK. BK. AY. BY 

? BL$ C28J ; "INPUT "::G 

INPUT AK. BK. AY. BY :GOS 

CF=1 : RETURN 

REM »»»» PARTITION SI 

? "MnsEiBoaoBsaiHHEinaiiB" 
? " NK.NY = ";NK;","; 
? " INPUT "; : GOSUB 48 
INPUT NK,NV:IF NK<3 T 
IF NK>N THEN NK=N 
IF NY<3 THEN NY=3 
IF NY>H THEN NY=N 
CF=1 : RETURN 
REM »»»« CENTER CHANG 

? " NitaBimEiscaBiHsaiaEiEiim" : 
? " CK , CY = " ; CK; " , "; 
? " INPUT ";:G0SUB 48 
INPUT CK,CY:RETURN 
REM »»»« FUNCTION CHA 



N] *«n»»i 

482 

RETURN 
URN 



PUT " ; 
UB 1128 



GF = 8 
TURN 



OSUB 488 
1138 



NGE 4(M4«-W-M-W-««W 



OSUB 488 
UB 1148 

: ? 

NY 

8 

HEN NK=3 



CY 
8 



NGE 



58 * ANTIC SOFTWARE LIBRARY 



OCTOBER 1985 



ET 


RR 


SO 


an 


TV 


ZI 


NN 


TE 


PN 


ID 


1 KA 


1 HV 


^FM 


IL 


YU 


QA 


AO 


EU 


DT 


WY 


BB 


GA 


ZM 


LK 


FC 


EK 


RZ 


NS 


MK 


QN 


^QA 


PWG 


VM 


IK 


WM 


IZK 



NG 
jlZ 
RU 
WC 
HB 
IC 
KF 
GC 
GL 
UU 
^UE 

icK 

XR 
LJ 
JK 
CX 
EH 
FO 
QO 
DA 
DL 
FK 
HE 
CQ 
NR 
FC 
JL 
NH 

CW 
ER 
GK 
MM 
DE 
KG 
QG 
lU 
XK 



7B2 
704 
766 
788 
728 
722 

724 

726 

758 

752 

754 

756 

758 

768 

762 

764 

888 

882 

884 

886 

888 

er • 

818 

812 

848 

842 

844 

846 

858 

852 

854 

856 

858 

868 

862 

864 
878 
872 
888 
882 
884 
886 
888 
898 
891 
892 
894 
896 
898 
988 
982 
984 

986 

988 

910 

912 

914 

916 

918 

928 

922 

924 

938 

932 

934 

936 

938 

948 

942 

Z 

944 

946 

948 

958 

952 

954 

956 

968 

961 



? ZS : ? ■■Z="; : GOSUB 48e:ZBS = ZS 

INPUT AS : ZS = "Z=" : ZS C31 =AS 

GOSUB 728 : CF=1 : RETURN 

REM »•»»» CREATE LINE 128 inn»4nnnnt 

GaSUB 1188:? "128 '• : ZS : 7 :? "CONT- 



PCS 
POK 
REM 
? •■ 



L = P 
POK 
AS = 
GOS 
REM 
GOS 
? •• 
POKE 



ITION 2,16:P0KE 842,13:ST0P 
E 842, 12 :RETURN 
wMi»w RECOVER LAST FUNCTION *••» 

mnimaBaBfamammumBtsniaiaaEinm y^n" 

»» current will die »»■■ ; 

EEKC764J:IF L=255 THEN 758 

E 764,2S5:IF L043 THEN RETURN 

Z5:ZS=ZBS:ZBS=AS 

UB 728 : CF = 1 : RETURN 

»« VALUE ERROR TRAP »»»«»»»» 
UB 1588 : POSITION 21,14 
'«»HE3nCDt3*nn»Hia[BiaGa»**" : POP :POP 
764, 255 : POSITION 2,16 



■aoDHHDBmnHcaBnQi 



to r ec OM 



IF PEEKC764J =255 THEN 818 

RETURN 

REM ■»*"»**■»•■ I/O TRAP -»»-i«-»n**t-**-i**********«-«n*«- 

GeSUB 1588 : POSITION 21,14 

CLOSE «2 : ? "Mwwai3ataHtaaBHtaHw<»«'> 

GOTO 886 

REM «»»» DISK DIRECTORY »«»»»«»*»• 

TRAP 848:P0KE 8 2 , 2 1 : P O S I T I ON 21,3 

FOR J=l TO 18:? BLSt22J:MEKT J 

POSITION 21,3 

CLOSE n2:0PEN nZ - 6 . 8 , "D : » . G 3D" 

FOR J=l TO ie:FOR 1=8 TO 1 

INPUT n2,AS:IF LENtASJ=16 THEN 878 

? ASt3,lBJ;" ■•;:NEXT I:? :NEKT J 
CLOSE t»2:P0SITION 21,13:? AS 
POKE 82,2:RETURN 
REM »»«« GET FILENAME »»»»»»«»»»»» 

? ■■ ■QincBiacgmoHmEiirBH ";fisc3) 

? " INPUT filenane ■■;:GOSUB 488 

INPUT AS : FIS = "D : ■■ : FIS C3J =AS 

FIStLENtFI53+lJ=".G3D":RETUHN 

REM »»»•• 2ND CHANCE *f »»»»»■»»»»•»«»*«» 

GOSUB 2198:? •• ■■OEiaQaBBaH Y/N" 

? •• filespecs ■•;FIS 

L=PEEKt764J : IF L=255 THEN 894 

POKE 764,2S5:IF L=43 THEN RETURN 

POP :RETURN 

REM »«»» SAVE TO DISK »»»»»»»»»«» 

? '• S ft V E":? :G0SU8 888 

GOSUB 898:GaSUB 1568: TRAP 848 

OPEN «t2, 8, 8, FIS : POKE 1913,88 

K=USRtI0,2.768B,SA1.113 

? «»2 ; ZS : ? M2 ; M 

? t»2;EX:? »«2;EY:? ««2;EZ 

? t*2 : AX : ? M2 ; BX 

? W2 ; AY : ? t»2 ; BY 

? »»2 ; CK : ? »»2 ; CY 

? t»2; NX : ? t«2; NY 

CLOSE n2:P0KE 1913,87 

GOSUB 158e:G8SUB 858:RETURN 

REM »*"**» LOAD FROM DISK »►»»»<««"»» 

? ■• L O A D":? :GOSUB 888 

GOSUB 898:G0SUB 1568:TRAP 848 

ZBS = ZS:0PEN »«2,4,e,FIS 

X=USRCI0,2,7688,SA1,7) 

INPUT »»2;ZS:INPUT ««2 ; M 

INPUT l»2;EX:INPUT «»2;EY:INPUT »«2 ; E 

INPUT «»2;AX:INPUT «2;BK 

INPUT i»2;AY:INPUT n2;BY 

INPUT ««2;CX:INPUT «»2;CY 

INPUT »«2;NX:INPUT »2;NY 

CLOSE <*2:G0SUB 1588 

GOSUB 1128:G0SUB 1138:G0SUB 1148 

GOSUB 728 : CF=1 : RETURN 

REM *«»*»« PRINT IT «<•»*«■*•»»"**"»**<"""• 

7 '• BB PRINT IT BB" : ? 



ET 
HL 
CU 
XD 
LY 
MM 
DC 
EJ 
SS 
MY 
HD 
GD 
IM 
SA 
GU 
DZ 
XU 
YN 
XM 

n J 

GH 
IV 
KO 
VF 
YR 
HL 
VM 
UR 
UC 
PP 
ZE 
OB 
KP 
SD 
U J 
RG 
XS 
KO 

XC 
EL 
CF 

GR 
CY 
SG 
IT 
XT 
IP 
DP 
JZ 
RB 

C A 
EA 
BG 
CZ 
OU 
HI 
IH 



OR 
TZ 
F J 
BF 
MV 
EI 
SA 
DC 

PL 
EI 
GK 
TZ 
JV 



962 

963 

964 

966 

968 

978 

971 

97 2 

973 

974 

976 

977 

978 

988 

982 

984 

986 

987 

988 

998 

HRS t 

992 

994 

1188 

1182 

1184 

1118 

1112 

1114 

1128 

1122 

1124 

1138 

1132 

1134 

1136 

1148 

1142 

1144 

I ■■ 

1146 

1158 

1152 

1154 

1188 

1182 

1184 

1186 

1188 

1198 

1192 

1194 

48) 

1196 

1588 

1582 

1584 

1586 

1588 

1518 



K = PEE 

POKE 

IF K< 

CLOSE 

REM I 

? M2 ; 

REM F 

IF K = 

? «»2; 

REM S 

? «»2 ; 

X = SA1 

FOR I 

FOR J 

BS C J , 

REM P 

IF K = 

? M2 ; 

8J ; BS 

NEXT 

CLOSE 

REM 

POSI 

POSI 

POSI 

POKE 

POKE 

REM 

GOSU 

GOSU 

REM 

GOSU 

? "E 

GOSU 

REM 

GOSU 

? •■ C 



■OHODCilNI ■■;FISC31:? 
1-LEFT 2-HIGHT' 

KC764l:IF K=255 THEN 964 
764 , 255 : TRAP 848 
>31 AND K<>3e THEN RETURN 

n2:OPEN tt2 , 8 , 8 , "P : " 
NITIALIZE 
CHHSt27J ;CHRSt64J ; 
ILENAME 
38 THEN 
CHHS C14J 
ET LINE 
CHRS C273 
♦192«48 

=8 TO 39 : T=X*I 
=1 TO 192 : T=T-48 
JJ =CHRS CPEEKCTl J : NEXT J 
HINT GRAPHICS STRING 
38 THEN ? ««2;BLS; 
CHRSt27J ;CHRSC75J :CHRStl92) 



»«2 ; BLS; 

■•;FISC3J 
FEED 
CHRSC51J ;CHRSC16) 



TION 
TION 



«*2 : RETURN 
tnnnt FORCED READ *»»«»»»»»»»» 
2,18:? BLS 
2,18: RETURN 
TION 1,18 

842,13: INPUT AS 

842,12: RETURN 
K<»Mw FILL MS 
B 1188:? •■MAG:";M 
B 1118 : MS=AS : RETURN 
tut-tut FILL ES 
B 1188 

YE :"; EX; '•.■■; ey; "."; EZ 
8 1118 : ES=A$ : RETURN 
«««« FILL IS 
B 1188 
"; AX; ", •■ : BK; ■■a*!"; AY; ■', ■•; by; • 



GOSUB 1118 : IS=AS : RETURN 

REM »»»»» FILL ZS 

GOSUB 1188 : P8SITI0N 2,17:LIST 128 

GOSUB 1118 : ZS=AS t51 : RETURN 

REM tnnnt LABEL SCREEN tnnnttttnnnttt 

X=USR(LBL,32,2,ADRCMS} ,LENtMS)) 

X=USRtLBL,8,23,ADRCIS) ,LENtIS)l 

X=USRCLBL,22,23,A0RCES),LENCES)) 

L=LENtZSJ:IF L>48 THEN L=48 

X=USRtLBL,8,8.ADRtZS) ,LJ 

IF LENtZSl<41 THEN RETURN 

H=USRCLBL,8,l,ADR(ZS)+48,LENtZSJ- 

RETURN 

REM innntSETUP 2 SCREENS tttnttnnnttt 

RAM=PEEK (186) : GRAPHICS 24:MODl=8 

DLlL=PEEKt568) : D L 1 H = P E E K ( 5 6 1 ) 

SA1L=PEEK t88) : S A 1 H = P E E K C 8 9 ) 

SA1=SA1L*256»SA1H 

POKE 186 , RAM-33 : GRAPHICS 8:M0D2=8 



DZ 1512 DL2L=PEEKt568) : DL2H=PEEKC561J 
PT 1514 SA2L=PEEKC88) : SAZH=PEEK t89J 
XG 1516 DL=DL2L+256»DL2H : POKE 186, RAM 



1518 

1S28 

1522 

1524 

1568 

1562 

1564 

1566 

28 

1568 

1588 

1582 

1584 

1586 



POKE DL*3,7l:P0KE DL*6,6 
POKE DL*8,64:P0KE DL+21,6 
POKE DL*22,6:P0KE DL*24,48 
RETURN 

REM »*»»» SCREEN 1 - PICTURE 
POKE 568 . DLIL : POKE 561,DL1H 
POKE 88,5A1L:P0KE 89.SA1H 
POKE 789,26:P8KE 718,8:POKE 



POKE 87, MODI : RETURN 

REM »«»« SCREEN 2 - MENU »*«*»«»« 

POKE 568 , DL2L : POKE 561,DL2H 

POKE 88,SA2L:P0KE 89,SA2H 

POKE 7e9,24:POKE 718,194:P0KE 712 



OCTOBER 1985 



continued on next page 
ANTIC SOFTWARE LIBRARY • 59 



uu 

KH 
YE 
MA 
ZR 
BM 
AE 
US 
OL 

FZ 
SA 
IH 
KR 
KG 
UG 
JU 
LB 
DU 
OJ 
DB 
FI 
CM 
RR 



. 224 
1588 
2088 
2882 
2818 
2812 
2814 
2816 
2818 
2828 
21, 
2822 
2824 
2826 
2828 
2838 
2832 
2834 
2836 
2 8 38 
2848 
2842 
2844 
2846 
2848 



: POKE 
POKE 
REM 
GOSU 
GOSU 
? "H 
GOSU 
K=PE 
POKE 
POSI 

14 
IF K 
IF 
IF 
IF 
IF 
IF 
IF 
IF 
IF 
IF 



788. 132 
87- M0D2 

«■*"» MAIM 

B 2288 

B 1588 : P 

B 2178 
EKC7641 : 
764, 255 
TIOH 21, 



:POKE 711,68 

: POKE 752,1:RETURN 

ROUTINE *t ■** -If- ^*■^* **■»*** -It**** 

OSITION 21,14 
irasaDHiaHEl"; :TRnP 848 

IF K=255 THEN 2816 

:G0SUB 2198 

14:? BLS C21J : POSITION 



K: 
K: 
K: 
K 

K: 
K: 
K: 
K: 
K: 
IF K: 
IF K: 



IF 
IF 



= 61 

37 
= 8 T 
= 42 
= 13 
= 35 
= 18 

56 
:48 

58 

62 

8 T 

18 

33 



THEN 

THEN 

HEN 

THEN 

THEN 

THEN 

THEN 

THEN 

THEN 

THEN 

THEN 

HEN 

THEN 

THEN 



GOSUB 
GOSUB 

GOSUB 
GOSUB 
GOSUB 
GOSUB 
GOSUB 
GOSUB 
GOSUB 
GOSUB 
GOSUB 

GOSUB 
GOSUB 
GOSUB 



388 
588 

528 : 
558 
688 
628 
658 
788 
758 
858 
988 

938 : 
968 
156 



: REM 
: REM 
REM . 
: REM 
: REM 
: REM 
: REM 
: REM 
: REM 
: REM 
: REM 
REM ■ 
: REM 
8 : REM 



■ . G 
. . M 

■ ■ O 
. . E 
. . I 
. . N 
. . C 
. . F 

■ . R 
. . D 
. . S 
. . L 
. . P 
SPACE 



KB 2858 IF PEEK t 764 3 = 255 AND PEEKt87J=8 T 

HEN 2858 

WV 2852 IF PEEKt764J=33 THEN POKE 764,255 

OF 2868 GSTO 2818 

IW 2188 REM *«»»» MAIN MENU M*M»«-»*nnt«Mn»*n» 

UV 2182 POKE 752, 1 : POSITION 2,8 

OT 2118 ? ■■■RHSBBHfiJBGaHBHQB ^^^.y^^^^^^^^ 



OQ 2112 ? ■■ Paul Chabot 
KU 2114 ? ••■OHPBHSraHCaBOai 



1985" 

■■■■■QQQScaaia 



[!]□■■■■■■ 

ED 2116 ? "tO] option 8 ■ 

TG 2118 ? "EFI Function | 

SG 2128 ? "IMJ Masni f icat ion I 

QM 2122 ? "lEl Eye Position | 

ZC 2124 ? "tci Center Screen | 

HP 2126 ? "EI] Interuals | 

WP 2128 ? "CNJ partition sizel 

VJ 2138 ? "CRl Recover last I 

UK 2132 ? "mmmmwmimamsmmmmm i 

KH 2134 ? "IL] Load [S] Savel 

SE 2136 ? "CPl print IDJ D i r . ■_ 

MF 2138 ? "OoooOoOoooOoOoOo" 

SG 2140 ? "■■■■■■OEIQISIBSQHBHHHQaBDmiaBHaBCB 

mxmmmm" 

MM 2158 GOSUB 85e:RETURN 

TI 2170 REM <nnn» MINI-MENU 

OS 2172 GOSUB 2198:? IS;" ";ES 

KL 2174 ? ZS:RETURN 

WD 2198 REM *nnnt CLEAN-UP 

FM 2192 POSITION 1,18:? " " 

HS 2194 FOR 1=16 TO 21:P0SITI0N 2,1 

WE 2196 ? BLS;:NEKT I 

YZ 2198 POSITION 2,16:RETURN 

RM 2280 REM »*»»» INITIALIZE »«»«««»«»«»». 

GP 2282 M=24 :LBL=1536:I0=1784 : M=158 

BK 2284 flK=-l :BK=l: AY=-1:BY=1:NK=8:NY=18 

OC 2286 EK=1B: EV=10:EZ=5 : CK=168 : CY=188 

TP 2218 DIM PK CN, N) , PY CN, N} ,PZCN, Nl 

LC 2212 DIM AS C78J ,15 C19J ,ES C15J ,MSC9J 

Zn 2214 DIM ZS t78J , ZBS t78J , FIS tl4J 

MK 2216 DIM B 3 CI 9 2 3 , B L S C 3 8 ) 

NY 2218 BLS=" ":BLSC38J=" ":BLSC2J=BLS 

WJ 2228 FIS="D : SAMPLE . G3D" 

UQ 2230 GOSUB 1588:G0SUB 158e:G0SUB 

PT 2232 GOSUB 1128:G0SUB 1138:G0SUB 

DK 2234 GOSUB 1 1 5 8 : C F = 1 : G F = 8 : GO SU B 

RF 2248 ZBS=ZS : RETURN 



2188 
1148 
388 



TYPO II UPDATE 

Here's a TYPO II update many readers requested for another Antic golden oldie — Math Wizard by 
Matthew Ratcliff (April, 1984). Only the line numbers and TYPO II codes are shown. 



MATH WIZARD 



ZJ 5 

XF 6 

QG 7 

HD 18 

LQ 28 

HB 38 

PC 48 

EU 58 

DE 68 

BT 78 

KU 88 

KE 98 

TE 180 

MG 110 

ON 128 

CD 130 

JM 148 

KU 150 

TC 160 

LR 170 

BZ 180 



UD 190 

GU 280 

TA 218 

JS 220 

NN 230 

CT 248 

LR 258 

IH 268 

UU 278 

ZB 288 

PZ 290 

ON 388 

TO 318 

QG 328 

lU 338 

KZ 340 

MB 3SO 

BD 360 

LH 370 

GJ 388 

RT 398 



UJ 408 

NG 418 

ZE 428 

PQ 438 

OC 440 

AT 450 

LK 460 

ZG 470 

JR 480 

RS 490 

EU 500 

ZD 510 

RZ 520 

OS 530 

UA 540 

HT 550 

GH 560 

KT 570 

AH 588 

EC 590 

HP 600 



IK 610 

JU 620 

UD 630 

CK 640 

IF 650 

DO 660 

PT 670 

II 680 

LY 690 

NJ 700 

CO 710 

KU 720 

KD 730 

NU 740 

KO 750 

ZP 760 

BG 770 

DS 780 

PZ 790 

ZE 880 

FG 810 



»J», 




£* 




-■: ■ ■,ai-isJa«*'i«HiEs!vs'-; 




rrr 


VA 


820 


YY 


1830 


HB 


830 


HF 


1040 


OD 


840 


WJ 


1858 


HD 


850 


KO 


1868 


BM 


860 


UV 


1878 


IK 


878 


ZD 


1880 


DK 


888 


SE 


1898 


AN 


890 


HJ 


1188 


AH 


900 


FO 


1118 


DK 


910 


GT 


1128 


BE 


920 


KC 


1138 


CO 


930 


AB 


1140 


EG 


940 


MS 


1150 


PR 


950 


KL 


1160 


SF 


960 


SI 


1170 


JM 


970 


GT 


1188 


JK 


980 


HN 


1190 


IM 


990 


UW 


1288 


LA 


1880 


FG 


1218 


YK 


1010 






TV 


1828 







60 • ANTIC SOFTWARE LIBRARY 



continued on page 62 
OCTOBER 1985 



A 

ATARI' 

$69.95 (Rom) 
$49.95 (D or C) 



Vastly SUPERIOR to any translation programs 

available! FOR ATARI 

1200XL/600XL/800XL with 64K. 

(Please specify computer model number!) 



THE 

XL "FIX"! 



A 

ATARI" 

$69.95 (Rom) 
$49.95 (D or C) 



The Atari XL series computers represent power, sophistication, and 
flexibility virtually unrivalled in todays Home Computer Market, 
With "approximately" 30-40% of existing software being "incom- 
patable", a real, and serious problem exists. Because of this we 
have developed THE XL "FIX"! 
ADVANTAGES over cheaper "translation products": 

1, The XL "FIX"! is capabie of fixing more software ... an estimated 
30% more software! 

2, The XL "FIX"! Is available in DISK, CASSEHE, and now ROM! 

3, XL "FIX"! versions fix ALL THREE types of software (Disk - Cassette - 
and Cartridges!) 

4, The XL "FIX"! (disk or cassette) adds OVER 4K of usable RAM to your 
computer (anyone using Data bases or Word processors will really 
appreciate this feature!) 

5, You never have to hold the OPTION button down on 600XL or 
800XL computers! 

6, VERY IMPORTANT! You need to load the XL "FIX"! only once ... you 
can change disks, cassettes, or cartridges without rebooting the XL 
"FIX"! each time (disk or cassette)! 

7, The ROM version Is instantaneous upon computer power up, has a 
high speed cursor, is instantly switchable to your original operating 
system, will work with 16K 600XL's, and more! 

The XL "FiX"! .... another SUPERIOR product! 64K requiredl 
DISTRIBUTOR/DEALER inquires welcome 



Mastercard-Visa-Money 
Order or Cashier Check, 
Phone (716) 467-9326 

Please specify computer 
model number! 



Send $49.95 ($69.95 fa Rom) 
plus $4 shipping and handling 
(N.Y.S. residents please add 7%) to: 
COMPUTER SOFTWARE SERVICES 
P.O. Box 17660 
Rochester, New York 14617 



A 

ATARr 



THREE NEW PRODUCTS! 
THE "SUPER PIU"! 



A 

ATARI' 



Exactly the same as the WORLD'S leading cartridge backup 
device . . . THE Pllil . . . except irs even simpler to operate, its 
SWITCHUSSI Excellent for families having young children. Totally 
eliminates opening computer doors and switches. THE "SUPER PIU"! is 
the most advanced state of the CARTRIDOE BACKUP device available 
today. It Is totally compotable with all AtARI computers and all programs 
backed up by the original "PILL"! Only S79.95 plus S4 shipping and 
handling. 

THE "PROTECTOR/SILENCER"! 

The "PftOTECTOft"! Is a disk and hardware modification (no 
soldering) for Atari 810, 1050, and Indus Gt disk drives that will allow you 
to write true BAD SECTORS wherever you wish (not to be confused with 
ridiculous speed control or tope jertdng schemes!). Powwful disk 
program finds hidden directories, scrambles existing directories, tost 
maps, hex conversions, disk dupes, and much more! 

The "SILfNCER"! quiets your drive tremendously (eliminates the 
LOUD grinding noise when you read a bod sector!), PLUS it allows you to 
WRITE TO BOTH SIDES of any disk WITHOUT cuHing or notching the disk! 
Both for only S49.95 plus S4 shipping and handling. 

THE "COMPANION"! 

An amazing device that will enhance the capabilities of the 
XL "FIX"! or Atari Translater. It will allow you to de-Mlad BASIC (no more 
need to hold the OPTION button while loading programs on the 600XL's 
and SOOXL's), and It will allow you to d«-selsct (lie DIAGNOSTICS (no 
more bod loads because of the DIAGNOSTICS jumping into the middle 
of your program load routine!). Installation is simple (10 minutes) and re- 
quires NO solderlngi Only S29.95 plus $4 shipping and handling. 

DISTRIBUTOR/DEAUR inquiries welcome. 
Our other fine products include THE "PILL"I, XL "FIX"!, "ll\^POSSIBLE"l, 
"fVlETAtVIORPHOSES"!, and "REMOTE"! 

Mastercard-Visa-Money 
Order or Cashiers Check. 
Phone orders: 
(716) 467-9326. 

Atari is a TM of Atari Inc. The 
"METAMORPHOSES"! is a TM 
of Computer Software 
Services (division of S.C.S.D., 
Inc.) 



COMPUTER SOFTWARE 

SERVICES 

P.O. Box 17660 

Rochestw, New York 14617 



A-TA 151 1 ^'^ years they said it couldn't be done . . 



THE 

"IMPOSSIBLE' 



JI| ® they claimed!. 



A 

ATARP 

$149.95 



$149 95 

Backup almost any disk currently available (even heavily protected programs) with an UNMODIFIED disk drivel 

Works with ANY disk drivel 
PURPOSE: The "IMPOSSIBLE" was developed in response to the estimated half million disk drive users that own o drive other than the Atari 810 (Indus, Per- 
com, Trak, Rana, Astra, etc.) that wish to BACK UP their protected software. Due to a radically newtechnology developed by Computer Software Ser- 
vices, modification to your disk drive has been eliminated! The advantages are obvious! Drive warranties are not violated, the chance accidental 
damage has been eliminated, etc., etc. 

OPERATION: The "IMPOSSIBLE"! consists of a disk program (unprotected so you can make as many backups as you wish) and a 4K STATIC RAM pack 
which isinsertedintoyourcomputer(nosolderlng!)The"IMPOSSIBLE"! will read yourprogramdisk and then re-wrlfe it In an unprotected format! You may 
moke additional backup copies usi ng a sector copier or even regular DOS! Because your backup copy no longer has BAD SECTORS or EXOTIC FORMATS 
the program data can now be manipulated into DOS compotable files (even doubie density!), transfered to cassette, etc. (with the aid of our Satellite 
programs!) No user programming knowledge required. A few programs require logical thinking. 



FEATURES: t. Backup protected disks 

2. Handles most MULTI-LOAD programs 

3. Makes DOS flies (with Satellite option) 

4. Up to 90K data input capable 
PROJECTED SATELLITES: A "COMPACTOR" program which wil 



5. AFSD-Automatic FUZZY Sector Discriminator 

6. Expands computer memory to 52K usable 

7. Simple NO SOUDER installation 

8. Satellite expandable 
convert your program into DOS compotable files (double density compotable!) for the 

storage of several programs on one disk. A "COLUMN 80" program for Word Proccessing, etc. It allows 80 columns on the screen! The "XL-MATE" wii! ailow 
programs made with your 400/800 "IMPOSSIBLE"! to now ploy on your XL Computer! The METAMORPHOSES II program will allowyou to convert your pro- 
tected CASSETTES Into disk DOS files and vice-versa. All satellite programs must be used with inconjunction with The "IMPOSSIBLE"! 
REQUIREMENTS: The "IMPOSSIBLE" diskette, the 4KSTAT!C RAM pack, a 400 or 800 computer (piease specify!) with 48K and "B" Rom's. NOTE! The very old 
ATARI computers were shipped with "A" Rom's which had some serious "Bugs". Even if you don't own an "IMPOSSIBLE,"you should upgrade to "B" Rom's 
(simple to install!) We have them ovaiiable at a very inexpensive price. CALL USI "XL" version available soon! 

NOT A PIRATING TOOL: We at C.S.S. did not design The "IMPOSSIBLE"! to put Software Manufactures out-of-business overnight! Nearly ali of our products 
have been "ripped-off" by industry parasite who have little or no ability to develop a product of their own so we can sympathize with their dilemma. All 
CSS products have built-in safe guards which prohibit their use for flagrant pirating. The "IMPOSSIBLE"! Is no exception! While The "IMPOSSIBLE"! back- 
up the most heavily protected programs, it also checks to see that the 4K STATIC RAM pack Is Installed before allowing the backup copy to 
execute! 



EXAMPLES: The "IMPOSSIBLE"! has been tested on 300 of the most pop- 
ular and heavily protected programs we could find. With nearly 4000 
programs for Atari, we DO NOT guarantee that it will backup all pro- 
grams in the past-present-and future! We will supply updates at $6 each 
(non-profit!) If and when necessary. Programs we hove successfully 
backed up include: Blue Max, Visi-cal, Archon, Mule. File Manager 800 
+, Syn Cole, Syn File, One on One, 7 Cities of Gold, Super Bunny, Load 
Runner, Drol, and Gumball iust to name a few! 



IVlastercard-Visa-Money 
Orders or Cashier Check. 
Phone:(716)467-9326 
Please specify computer 
model number! 



Send S149.95 plus 

$4 shipping and handling 

(N.Y.S. residents please add 7%) 

COMPUTER SOFIWAfiE SERVICES 
P.O. BOX 17660 
ROCHESTER, N.Y. 14617 



KZ 1228 

VB 1230 

AM 1240 

DR 1250 

OU 1260 

QT 1270 

BK 1280 

NN 1290 

Ky 1300 

KM 1310 

MD 1320 

UE 1330 

WZ 1340 

LO 1350 

QJ 1360 

FG 1370 

TE 1380 

RF 1390 

LE 1408 

PC 1410 

DB 1420 

01 1430 



DX 1440 

HM 1450 

GU 1460 

RL 1470 

lU 1480 

ZZ 1490 

HP 1500 

PC 1510 

OL 1520 

CI 1530 

KS 1540 

LC 1550 

MD 1560 

UL 1570 

VV 1580 

NS 1590 

on 1600 

YP 1610 

EG 1620 

UQ 1630 

AH 1640 

KE 1650 



NJ 1660 

OD 1670 

FR 1680 

SO 1690 

NJ 1700 

HR 1710 

EG 1720 

KF 1730 

DW 1740 

BD 1750 

OL 1760 

PI 1770 

JL 1780 

PP 1790 

TV 1800 

FF 1810 

NX 1820 

KM 1830 

NM 1840 

XF 1850 

CE 1860 



same of the month 



ALIEN ASYLUM 



Article on page 31 



LISTING 1 



Don't type the 
TYPO II Codes!' 



ts. 



UK 10 REM ASYLUM 

PG 20 REM BY SPENCER CRASKE 

ZF 38 HEM CC3 1985. Antic Publishing 

EU 40 I=1:GRAPHICS 17:SETC0L0R 4,7.2 

OLOR 3. 0. 14 : SETCOLOR 0,2.14 
CK 50 SETCOLOR 2 . 3 . 6 : SETCOLOR 1,12,1 

UB 150 
CR 60 POKE 1O6.PEEKC7401 
YU 70 SC=PEEKC881 «256«PEEKC891 : MN=3 : 

S=l : EG=58 : NF=1 : DIM IN5C4} 
IB 80 DIM AS C501 : A$ = "[IiSa] ■■iSiliiE ■■U^ujil] 



CO . 
: SETC 



2 : GOS 



KL = 5: 



FN 90 DIM BS C50] : BS="BSa ■■SSS ■■SSB ■■BQ 
BZ 1O0 DIM CS €501 : CS = "SSS ■■IBiSS; ■■SBS MBS] 

JG 110 POSITION 0.21:? »tb;"score: l< 

eys :••: POSITION 0,22:? «t6;"nen: level: 
SH: ■■ 

PK 120 NTOP=PEEKI1061 -10 : POKE 106,NTOP:NS 
ET=NT0P»2S6 : DIM CM$C321 

VT 130 CMS = "hhnmhnDhna:t>n[!]iiiHa«aDRa][i][ana[!]ncn 

lara*" 

NG 140 CM=USR CADR (CMSl , 57344. NSETl : POKE 7 

56.HT0P:GOTO 170 
SJ ISO POSITION 6.1-1:? n6 ; " ":P05ITI 

ON 5.1*1:? «6;" 
NH 160 POSITION 6.1:? M6 ; "a I i en" : POSI T I ON 

5,1*2:? ne: "ASYLUMS" : RETURN 
HB 170 FOR T=0 TO 47:READ A:POKE NSET*8+T 

, A : NEXT T 
IG 180 FOR X=0 TO 419:POKE SC*X,6:NEXT X: 

COLOR 13e:PL0T O,0:DRAUTO 19,0:DRAMT0 

19,20:DRAUTO 0,2O:DRAUTO 0,0 
JM 190 X=10 : V=9:PK=10 : PY=Y : GOSUB 420 
PR 200 Q=PEEKC6321 : LY= Ca=13J - CQ=14J : LX= CQ 

=7J- fa=llJ 

62 * ANTIC SOFTWARE LIBRARY 



KL 

UR 
HX 

UZ 
ZM 
AR 
MD 

BS 



lY 
PL 
GE 

IH 

UI 
HG 

UT 
TB 
PS 

LP 
AX 
UL 
LV 



210 IF LX=0 AND LV=0 THEN LY 

X 

220 OLX=LX : OLV=LY 

230 POSITION 1,10:? »»6;CSCS. 

TION 1.15:? "6 ; BS CS, S*17J 

240 POSITION 1,5:? a6;AS(S,S 

250 IF S*17=LEN CASJ -1 THEN R 

260 IF S=l THEN R=l 

270 IF PEEKfZO) >=118- C10«KL1 

CR»2J-l:POKE 20,0 

280 Y=Y*LY : X=H*LH :LOCATE X,V 

THEN SOUND O , 250 , 10 , 10 : SOUN 
SR=SR*10:B=B*l:EG=EG*2 
290 IF C=130 THEN X=PX:V=PV: 
. C 

300 IF Y=5 OR Y=10 OR Y=15 T 
63 OR C=164 THEN GOSUB 630 
310 IF C=l THEN K=K*1:SH=SR* 
TO 30:S0UND O , RND CO) w255 , 1 
I:S0UND 0.0,0.0 
320 COLOR 32:PLOT PX.PV:COLO 

K. Y :PX=X : PV=V 
330 EG=EG-l:lF EG<=0 THEN GO 
340 IF G=0 THEN IF SR>=100Oe 
MN=MN*1 

350 IF EG>99 THEN EG=99 
360 POSITION 18.21:? «t6 ; " 
370 POSITION 6.21:? <t6:SR:P0 
21:? <t6; KL-K:POSITION 4.22:? 
ITION 12.22:? tt6;LVL 
380 POSITION 18.22:? «»6 ; " " 
18.22:? U6; EG 

390 POKE NSET*52.HF:NF=NF«2: 
THEN NF=1 

400 IF K=KL THEN LUL=LVL*1:S 
L: K=0 : 1=0 : GOTO 670 
410 GOTO 200 



OLY: LX=0L 



S*17J : POSI 



*17) 
= 



THEN S=S* 



C:IF 0=38 
D 0.0.0,0: 



LOCATE X,Y 
HEN IF C=l 



10O:FOR I= 
0.14: NEXT 



R 133:PLOT 



SUB 630 
THEN G=l: 



SITION 18, 
n6: MN : POS 

: POSITION 

IF NF>128 

=1 : KL=5*LW 



OCTOBER 1985 



GA 



CK 
WP 



SP 

KU 



TU 



LQ 
GZ 

MY 
MS 
ML 
HI 
FC 



FG 
BQ 



UI 
EH 



42B POSITION l.ie:? «»6 ; CS CS , 5*17 J : POSI 

TIOH 1.15:? MGiBSCS.S+l?! :POSITIOM 1,5 

:? «t6;ftS CS- S*17J 

438 FOB T=l TO KL 

448 COLOR 1:R = IIIT CHMDC8J»28J :RH = INT CRN 

DCej»2ej :LOCftTE H.RR.C:IF C<>38 THEN 4 

48 

458 PLOT R.RR-.NEKT T:RETURN 

468 SOUND I, 8, 8, 8 : SOUND 8,8.8,8:F0R K= 

8 TO 419:POKE SC«K.e:NEKT H 

478 POSITION 8.4:? »»6 ; ■' Mou have achle 

ved QBEgma ■•;mL:lF SR>=HISC THEN H 

ISC=SH 

488 CLOSE Ml 

498 IF H1SC=SR THEN ? n6;"ENTER INITIft 

LS":OPEN »1. 4. e."K: '■ : GOTO 518 

588 IN=0:GOTO 568 

518 C=l:INS=" ":THftP 510 

528 IF C<1 OH C>4 THEN 518 

538 GET »tl,IN:IF IH = 155 THEN 578 

548 IF IN=254 OR IN=126 OR IM=38 THEN 

INSCCJ=" •■: C = C-1 : POSITION 7 + C.12:? tt 

6;" ":G0T0 520 

558 INS CC, CJ =CHRS tINJ : C=C*1 



568 POSITION 0.10:? »«6;"HI 
HISC;" BY :'": POSITION 8.12: 
J : IF IN08 THEN 520 
578 POSITION 3.28:? tt6;"PHESS 
588 CR=8 



SCORE IS • 
><6; INS CI , 



aii}oc9tBac3' 



MK 598 CR=CH-121»CCH> 128J *1 : FOR K=788 TO 

711:P0KE K. CR+32»CK-788J : NEXT X:IF STH 

IGC81 THEN 598 
KN 688 SETCOLOR 4 , 7 . 2 : SET COLOR 3.8,14:SET 

COLOR 8. 2. 14 : SETCOLOR 2 . 3 . 6 : SET COL OR 1 

,12.12 
on 610 OLK=0 : OLY=8 : LWL=0 :SR=8 : K=0 : KL=5 : S= 

1 :MM=3 : EG=5e : POSITION 6.21 
EG 628 ? tt6;" ":G0T0 188 
FO 630 COLOR 32 : PLOT PH . PY : COLOR 37:PL0T 

H. V 
MH 640 MN=MN-1 : X=18 : Y=9 : FOR T=100 TO 8 ST 

EP -l:SOUND . T ^75 . 1 , 15 : SOUND I.CIOO- 

TJ ♦75. 10. 15 : NEXT T:IF MN=-1 THEN 468 
DV 658 SOUND 8 , 8 . 8 . : SOUND 1.8.8.8 
MR 668 0LX=8 : OLY=0 : EG=50 : RETURN 
JO 670 FOR 1 = 1 TO 5 : CMS CI . IJ =CHRS tPEEKC70 

7+IJJ:NEXT I:FOR 1=0 TO 9 
XH 688 FOR Y=708 TO 712:P0KE Y.PEEKCY5*I: 

NEXT Y : NEXT I 
ZJ 690 FOR 1=1 TO 5:P0KE 787 + I . ft SC CCMS C I , 

II ) : NEXT I 
OL 700 OLX=0 : 0LV=8 : EG=58 : GOTO 180 
ftM 710 DftTft 7,5.253,165.165.7.8.8.8.68.12 

6. 126. 126. 126. 68-0. 124. 84, 254, 146, 214, 

0,8,8,124,214,214,124,56 
KY 728 DftTft 124,84,0,16,84,56.238.56.84-1 

6.8.8,0.8.00.16.0.0.8 



bonus same 



LEMONADE 



Article on pase 32 



LISTING 1 



Don't type the 
TYPO II Codes! 



t^ 



TR 5 REM LEMONADE 

DT 18 REM BY BOB POLftRO 

BP 12 REM ANTIC PUBLISHING 

JO 15 OPEN «»1,4.8."K: " :OPEH m3 , 4 , 8 , "S : " : G 

OTO 48 
SS 28 FOR Z9=l TO 18:NEXT Z9:SOUND 2,8,8, 

8 :RETURN 
HU 38 POSITION 0,11:? tt6 ; BS ; BS ;: POSIT ION 

8,11 : RETURN 
VC 48 DIM IS C5J , XSC2ej , P C8) , BS C20J 
PU 58 GRAPHICS 17 

JP 60 BS=" ":G0T0 110 

CF 78 SETCOLOR 4,8.8:S0UND 3 , 188 , 88 , 18 : FO 
R Z9=l TO 28:NEHT Z9:S0UND 3,0,8,e:RET 
URN 
Vft 88 RESTORE 90:POSITION 1,13:? nf, : "fSSilsa 
j3S3E3aa!3S3aCiS3i3aE3E3" : F O R 1 = 1 TO 8: READ HS : P 
HINT •t6;" ■■;XS:NEXT I:RETURN 
ZJ 90 DftTft s igns , nade , so 1 d , pr i c e , i nc one , e 

xpenses, profit, assets 
UR 180 ftS=INT CH»XS*H41 : RETURN 
EP 118 S2=38 :PC8J =2:S3=8. 15:H=100 :H4=8-5 : 

C = 2 
BC 128 PRINT «»6;" lenonade" 
HY 138 D=0*1 
SM 140 FOR 1=5 TO 7:POSITION 8,I:PRXNT «6 

'BS' INEKT X 
HR 158 POSITION 8,2:PC3J=8:? M6 ; " ElBH " ; D 

EP 168 08=:PC8] : GOSUB 788 

TU 178 ? ««6;" raBBSDHMBBMBS"; HS; " 

DP 188 C3=8 : XS="" : GOSUB 760:IF RN>5 THEN 

220 
PK 190 RESTORE 288 : FOR 1=1 TO RN:REftD XS . 

C3:NEXT I 
DE 280 DftTft teaMSters s t r i ke . 4 , » enon shor 

t age ,6 
OCTOBER 1985 



C J 

PM 
UR 
UM 



SY 
JH 

WC 

IB 

GY 



FS 
HK 

CT 
FO 
HN 

CW 



EX 
OM 
TM 



218 DftTft prices do wn , -4 - supp 1 y increas 

ei-4-i n f 1 a t i o n.2 

228 C=C+C3:IF C<2 THEN C=2 

230 C1=C»0.01 

240 POSITION 8-4:? <<6 : " S^XBOammrSBBB" i : 

IS=STRS CC/100J : IF LENCISJ<4 THEN ISC4, 

41 ="8" 

258 ? W6; IS C2, 4J : R=l : P C4J =8 :P CIJ =8: IF 

HSO"" THEN ? «»6;" ";ks 

268 GOSUB 76e:RR=RN 

278 IF RH = 1 THEN ? »»6 ; " EJBHtaEimaHHtaDBOB 

Hm" : H=8 . 5 

288 IF RH = 2 THEN ? tt6;" BBElElCSraaCaaaCiJElEKn 

":R=e:SOUND 3,100,68,100 

290 IF RH = 3 THEN ? tt6 ; " GJBEIBEMIDBBEBEBH 
■H" : H=2 

388 POSITION 0,8:? ts6:" □CDHBSiaaaaiGjeiEiaB 
--•■: H = 16 : Y = 8 : L = 2 : M0 = 18 : GOSUB 748:? n6 

:" •■:SOUND 3,8,8,e:IF BftD = l THEN 388 

318 IF I0>99 THEN 388 

328 XS=I8»C1 : GOSUB 188 : XI = AS : XS=P C8 J : G 

OSUB 188 

338 IF Xl<=ftS THEN 358 

340 GOSUB 69e:GOTO 380 

358 P C2) =18 : GOSUB 760:IF NO=8 THEN 53= 

CHN*7J»e . 81 

360 POSITION 8,9:? M6 ; " BHBOHBBB" ; S3»l 

80;" BatnOB - " : H = 17*LEN CSTRS CS3»100J J - 

1 : Y=9 : L=l : M8=19 : GOSUB 748 

365 IF BAD THEN 368 

370 IF I8>9 THEN 368 

388 08 = P C8J -P C2J»»C1 : XS = I0»S3 : GOSUB 10B 

: Xl=ftS : XS=08 : GOSUB 188:IF Kl<=ftS THEN 

488 

continued on next pase 
ANTIC SOFTWARE LIBRARY * 63 



KU 
GC 
UD 



KR 
PR 



OZ 



OP 
OF 



EU 



ZJ 



LV 

ZM 
XI 
BI 

VG 
FV 
HA 
YC 
TH 

AN 
VO 
FG 

VU 
KS 



398 GOSUB 69e:GOTO 368 

488 PCl}=ie 

418 POSITION 1.18:? »»6 ; "aQotaHeaHBraHB -- 

": K = 13 : V = 18 : L = 2: 110 = 28: GOSUB 748:? ««6 ; ■■ 

":IF BAD THEN 418 
428 Pt4)=I8:M7=8 

438 GOSUB 38:? <>6 : " [S][9E]n? cnOClI -" : : X = l 1 
: Y=ll : L=l : GOSUB 778:IF IS="" THEN 438 
448 N0=8:IF I$C1,1J="N" THEN NO=l:GO T 

388 

458 IF IS tl . IJ <>"V" THEN 438 

468 GOSUB 38:G0SUB 768:IF RN>5 THEN 49 

e 

478 IF RR = 1 THEN ? <«6:" SBDHEJHCaHCHan" : 
FOR 1=1 TO 48:SETC0L0R 4.8.12:G0SUB 78 
:NEXT I : P C31 =8 :GOSUB 38:G0T0 548 
488 IF RR = 2 THEN GOSUB 38:? <*G : " CEJiacaQ 

BBBHamnBiioHBaQ" : ? t*6 : " EiQaammaBS • • ■■ : p c 3 1 

=PC21 :GOTO 548 

498 IF PI4J>12 THEN 518 

588 Nl= tl2-P C4J J/12»8 . 8«S2*S2 : GO TO 52 

a 

518 
528 
538 

1 1 
548 
558 
568 
578 
588 



QEiiiicataDarao ! • ■■ : gosub 

PRESS start BUTTON 



N1=C12^2«S2/P t4J ^21 

N2 = R*»CNl*NH*tl-EXPt-PI13»C91»C21J 

GOSUB 768:PC31=INTtN2»te. 95^RN*8 . 1 



= AS 



KS=P C3) : GOSUB 188:X1= 

HS = P (21 : GOSUB 188 

IF H1<=AS THEN 588 

PC3J =P C2J 

PC53=PC3J»Pt4J«8.81:PC63=PClJ»S3*P 
C2H»C1 

598 Pt7J=Pt5J-Pt61 :PC81=PC83+PC7J 
688 GOSUB 88 

618 FOR F=l TO 8:08=PtF3:lF F=4 THEN O 
8 = 08/^188 

628 GOSUB 678:NEKT F 
638 IF Pf8]>=Cl THEN 138 



JL 648 GOSUB 38:? <*6 ; 

738 
ZP 658 GOSUB 38:? tt6 ; 

": GOSUB 778 
OJ 668 GOTO 668 
DF 678 XS=STR5C08) :SG=8:IF F>3 THEN GOSUB 

788:IF 08<8 THEN SG=-1 
XC 688 POSITION 18.F + 13:? M6 ; ■■ •• : P 

OSITION 11*SG.F*13:? «S6 i X5 : RETURN 
RY 698 GOSUB 38:PRINT *t6:" IilElDHtSIIICaigEIBSBOSB 

SDB":GOSUB 73e:G0SUB 38:RETURN 
QH 788 IS="":IF 08»1 8=INT t 08«18) THEN IS= 

"8" 
FH 718 IF 08=INTC08) THEN IS=".88" 
LU 728 X5 = STR5C08) :XSCLENCXSI4^11 =IS : RETUR 

N 
KO 738 SOUND 2,29.2,7:F0R Z=l TO 28e:NEXT 

Z:GOTO 28 
PQ 748 BAD=8:G0SUB 778 : XS=IS : TRAP 758:18= 

UAL CXS) : RETURN 
GI 758 BAO=l:RETURN 

QU 768 RN=INT CRND €81*18) *1 : RETURN 
EP 770 0=8 : IS="": SOUND 2 , 188 . 188 , 188 : GOSU 

8 28 
EJ 780 IF PEEKtS3279J =6 THEN RUN 
LS 798 IF L=28 AND PEEK C 764 I =255 THEN 788 

SW 888 POSITION X*0.Y:6ET *«3 . J 

HC 818 POSITION H+O.V:? «6 ; CHR5 t Jl : IF PEE 
KC764J=255 THEN POSITION X*0,Y:? MS;" 

■ I 

DV 828 IF PEEKC532791 =6 THEN RUN 

GE 838 IF PEEKC7641 =255 THEN 818 

PJ 848 POSITION X*0,V:GET nl . XX : POKE 764. 

255:IF XH=155 OR XH=126 THEN RETURN 

LK 858 0=0«1 : IS (LEN CIS} «1] =CHR$ CHXl : PRINT 

«&: CHRS CXX) : : IF 0=L THEN L=28:RETURN 

OR 868 GOTO 888 



assembly languase 



FINE SCROLLING WORLD: 



PART II 

LISTING 1 



Article on pase 72 



8 ; FINE SCROLLING. LISTING 1 

18 ; BY MARK ANDREUS 

20 : ANTIC PUBLISHING 

30 : 

40 »= S3888 

45 JMP INIT 

58 ; 



60 SDMCTL = 


S022F 


78 ; 






80 SDLSTL = 


58238 


90 SDLSTH = 


S8231 


0100 


; 




8118 


COL0R8 


= Se2C4 


R 






0128 


COLORl 


= S82CS 


0138 


C0L0R2 


= Se2C6 


0140 


COLORS 


= Se2C7 


8150 


COL0R4 


= S82C8 


8160 


HSCROL 


= SD404 


0162 


VVBLKI 


= S0222 


TOR 






0164 


SYSUBV 


= SE45F 


VECTOR 





;0S COLOR REGISTE 



:0S INTERRUPT VEC 
; INTERRUPT ENABLE 



64 * ANTIC SOFTWARE LIBRARY 




0166 SETUBI = SE45C .SET VERTICAL BLA 

NK INTERRUPT VECTOR 

8168 XITUBL = SE4G2 ; EXIT UBI VECTOR 

8178 TCKPTR = S2808 

8188 F5CPTH = TCKPTR+1 

8190 .OPT OBJ 

8288 : 

8218 ; DISPLAY LIST DATA 

022O : 

8238 START 

0240 LINEl .SBYTE " ANTIC PRESENTS 



0258 LINE2 .SBYTE 

■ I 

8260 -SBYTE ■• 
8278 LINE3 .SBYTE 



fine scroi i ins 
On You 



8280 .SBYTE " Atari 

0298 LIHE4 .SBYTE ■■ BY tYOUR NAME! 
• a 

8388 : 

0310 ; DISPLAY LIST 



OCTOBER 1985 



: t 'HELLO 
.BYTE 578,570,578 
-BYTE 578,578.578,578,57 
.BYTE 546 
.MORD LIMEl 



LISTJ 



8328 : 

8338 HL5T NOP 

8348 

8358 

8368 

8378 

0388 .BYTE 578,578,578,578,557 

8398 SCROLN NOP : CTHIS IS THE LIN 

E UE'LL SCROLL! 

8488 .UORD 588 ; A BLANK TO BE F 

ILLED IN LATER 

-BYTE 578,542 

.UORD LINE3 

.BYTE 578,578,578,578,546 

.WORD LINE4 

.BYTE 578.578,578,578,578 

.BYTE 541 

.UORD HLST 



8418 

8428 

8438 

0440 

8458 

8468 

8470 

8480 

8498 

8588 ; 

8518 IHIT NOP 

ROGRAM 



RUN PROGRAM 



: PREPARE TO RUN P 



LDA COLORS 

STA COLORl 

LDA COL0R4 

STA COL0R2 



8528 

TER 

8538 

8548 

0550 

8568 ; 

8578 LDA nO : 

E DISPLAY LIST IS 

STA SDMCTL 
LDA nHLST«255 
STA SDLSTL 
LDA »«HL5T/256 
STA SDLSTH 
LDA ts522 
STA SDMCTL 
JSR TCKSET ; 



SET COLOR REGIS 



TELL ANTIC UHER 



INITIAIZE TICKE 



0588 

8598 

0680 

0618 

8628 

0630 

0640 

0645 

R ADDRESS 

0650 : 

8668 ; FINE-SCROLLING ROUTINE 

8680 LDA t*42 ; *< OF CHARACTERS 

IN SCROLL LINE 
0690 STA TCKPTR 
0700 LDA «S8 
0710 STA FSCPTR : NUMBER OF COLOR 

CLOCKS TO FINE-SCROLL 
8728 : 

ENABLE INTERRUPT 



LDY nTCKINTa255 

LDK MTCKIHT/256 

LDA «<6 

JSR SETWBI 

TICKER INTERRUPT 



8738 

8748 

0750 

0760 

0770 

0780 

8790 

0800 

0810 ; 

0820 TCKINT 

0830 LDA ttSCR0LLa255 

0840 STA VVBLKI 

0850 LDA ttsCROLL/256 

0860 STA UUBLKI-»1 

0870 ; 

0880 INFIN 



0890 JMP INFIN 

0900 ; 

8918 SCROLL 

0920 LDK FSCPTR 

0925 DEY 

093O DEX 

094O SIX HSCROL 

0950 BNE CONT 

0960 LDX ns 

0970 CONT NOP 

8988 STK FSCPTR 

8998 CPH »t7 

leee bed coarse 

1918 JMP SYSVBW 

1828 COARSE 

1838 LDY TCKPTR 

OCTOBER 1985 



INFINITE LOOP 



;8 TO START 



CCOHTIMUE) 



NUMBER OF CHARA 



CTERS TO SCRI 


ILL 


1840 


DEY 




1850 


BNE 


SCORSE ; 


ENTIRE LINE IS SCROLLED 


1868 


LDY 


»»42 


1878 


JSR 


TCKSET ; 


HE 






1880 


SCORSE NOP ; 


L 






1090 


STY 


TCKPTR 


1100 


INC 


SCROLN ; 


HESS 






1110 


BNE 


RETURN 


1120 


INC 


SCROLN*! ; 


DDRESS 




1130 


RETURN 




1140 


JMP 


SYSWBU 


1150 


; 




1160 


TCKSET 




1170 


LDA 


*tLINE2»255 


1180 


STA 


SCROLN 


1190 


LDA 


WLINE2/256 


1200 


STA 


SCROLN+1 


1218 


ENDIT 




1228 


HTS 




1288 


**= 


5e2E8 


1298 


■UORD INIT 



LOOP BACK TILL 

RESET TICKER LI 
DO COARSE SCROL 

LOU BYTE OF ADD 

HIGH BYTE OF A 



LISTING 2 



O : FINE SCROLLING, LISTING 2 

10 : BY MARK ANDREUS 

20 ; ANTIC PUBLISHING 

0190 ; 

0240 LINEl .BYTE 588 , 588, 588, 521 , 52E. 5 

34,529,523,580 

0245 .BYTE 530, 532 . 525, 533, 525. S2E 

.534,533.500.500.508 

8258 LINE2 .BYTE 588,588,500,588,588,5 

00,500,588,588,588,580 



8255 



■BYTE 580.588.588.588,580.588 



.500.500,500,500, 588, 508.588 



8268 



■BYTE 500.580.588.580.508.500 



. 566. 569. S6E, 565, 500, 573, 563, 572 

0265 .BYTE S6F , 56C , S6C , 569, S6E , 567 

.500.500.500.500.508.500.508.588 

8278 LINE3 .BYTE 580,500,500,500,500,5 

00,500,500,500,500,508, 500, 588 

8275 .BYTE S2F , S6E , 588 , 539 , 56F , 575 

.572 

8288 -BYTE 580.521.574.561,572.569 

,500,500,500,500,500 

0285 .BYTE 508,588,500.500.500.500 

.S00.500. 50e 

0290 LINE4 -BYTE 500. 500. 50O. 522 . 539. S 

00. 508. 539. 52F- 535. 532 

0295 .BYTE 500. 52E. 521 - 52D . 525, 589 

,500,500,500 



End Program Typing Agony Forever! 
Antic Ma3azine+ 
)isk Subscription 

Instant Relief! 
Only $99.95 
for 12 issues. 




ANTIC SOFTWARE LIBRARY • 65 



St section 



GEM COLOR CASCADE 

LISTING 1 



5'i.j^s^:isg-a-aafT^<£jv ,- ■■'■'•■ ■-? J^^J?-?«r.S-^ 



Article on page 20 






VE 18 REM SINE UflVES 

PB 20 REM BV PATRICK BASS 

FU 38 REM CCJ 1985, ANTIC PUBLISHING 

PA 188 OPEN ««1, 4, 8, "K: " 

UH 118 KRES=319 : YHES=191 

NJ 128 FOR L00P=8 TO 1 STEP 8 

JB 138 GRAPHICS 8+16 

RS 148 SETCOLOR 2 . 8 . 8 : SETCOLOR 4.8.a:CQL0 

R 1 

GK 158 SINEAMPL.ITUDE= CRND t91M78] +18 

RZ 168 COSINEAMPLITUDE= CRHD C91W78) «18 

LU 178 SINEPERIOD= tRND t91»7ei +5 

CP 188 C0SIMEPERI0D= CRND C9) W781 «^5 

OQ 198 SIZE=CRND t9I»5} +1 



FH 288 FOR KPaiNT=8 TO KRES STEP SIZE 

KZ 218 SINEY= CSINCXP0INT/SINEPERI0D1«SINE 

AMPLITUDE! + tVBES/'2J 
UE 228 COSINEY= CCOS CKPOINT/COSINEPERIOD]» 

COSINEAMPLITUDE) + CYHES/'ZJ 
LV 238 PLOT KPOINT , SINE Y : DR AUTO KRES-XPOI 

NT. COSINEY 
MA 248 IF PEEKC764] 0255 THEN KPOINT=XRES 



BD 258 NEXT KPOINT 

LB 268 GET *>1. KEYPRESS 

DJ 278 IF CHRS (KEYPRESS) 

NJ 288 NEKT LOOP 



THEN LOOP=Z 



LISTING 2 



/^** color Sinewaue progran **/ 

/** By pa-trick Bass *t/ 

/** CC3 1985, ANTIC PUBLISHING »/ 

ttinclude "por-tab . h" 

ttinclude ■•obdefs.h" 

ssinclude "define. h" 

ttinclude "gewdef s . h" 

ttinclude "osbind.h" 

in-t conl:rl tl2] , inn:int2563, Ptsin[2563, intou-t [2561 

int l_inl:in[20] , l—Ptsin [28] , l— out [1883 ; 

int color, wax—Color, handle, xres, yres; 

int i, k, iter, loop, tiwes, dunny; 

int sin_ar>ipl itude, cos_anpl itude ; 

int sin_period, cos_period, step; 

int key_state; 

double nunber, xpoint; 

extern double sinci, costi, randoncj ; 

na in C} 
■C 

appi_ini t CJ ; 

hand 1 e=gra f _hand 1 e C&dunny , jtdunny , «dunny , ftdunny] ; 

forci=e; i<ie; i++J 
< 

l_intin [i] =1; 
> 

1— intin tie] =2; 

M_opnvwk Cl_intin, ^handle, l_out] ; 
xres=i_out C0] ; 
yres=l_out [1] ; 
i<iiax_color=:i_out [13] ; 

66 • ANTIC SOFTWARE LIBRARY 



ptsout [256] ; 



OCTOBER 1985 



fore ioop=0; loop < l; loop=loop+e J 

do 
< 

color= RandonC) & 15; 

> 

whiiec color < 8 II color > i<iax_coior 3; 

usl_coior( handle, color ); 

st:ep=t RandoMtJ « 3 3+1; 
do 

sin_aMpl it:ude= C RandoriCJ « 255 3+10; 
While C sin_aMpl inude < 38 I I sin_aMpl iXude > Cyres/25 3; 

do 

•C 

cos_ai<tpli-tude=t RandoMf3 « 255 3+18; 

whileC cos—awpiitude < 38 I I cos_aMpi itude > tyres/23 3; 

do 

< 

sin_period=t RandOMC3 « 127 3+18; 

> 

whilet sin_period < 18 I I sin_period > 188 3; 

do 

cos_period=C Randoi<if3 « 127 3+10; 

whileC cos_period < 18 I I cos_period > 188 3; 

*orCit:er = l; iter<xres; iter = il:er+step3 

< 

xpoint^i ter ; 

ptsin [81 =xpoinl:; 

pt:sintl] = tsinfxpoint/sin_period3**sin_ai<ipiit:ude3 + cyres/23 ; 

p-tsin [23 = txres-xpoin-t3 ; 

ptsin [33 = Ccos txpoint/c os_per i od3 »c os_ai«ipl ii:ude3 + cyres/'23 ; 

u_plinec handle, 2, p-tsin3 ; 



do 

< 

v*i_key_s c handle, «ketf_s-ta-te 3; 

> 

WhileC key_s-tate ==83; 

if t key_state ==8 3 loop=2; 



M_c 1 suwk chand 1 e3 ; 
appl—exit C3 ; 



OCTOBER 1985 ANTIC SOFTWARE UBRARY * 67 



ATARI BONANZA 
POWER WITHOUT THE PRICE 



Listed below are computers, peripherals, 
software, video games and special pack- 
age offers at incredibly low, ATARI-factory 
prices. Now you, or someone you know, 



can own a brand-new Atari system or 
add exciting software to an already exist- 
ing library, at tremendous savings! 



SPECIALS 



LEARNING SYSTEM 

800XL Computer with 64K, 
1010 Program Cassette Recorder, 
Music Composer software, 
Speed Reading courseware and 
tapes. Touch Typing, States 
and Capitols, 
Invitations to 
Programming 1 



HOME MANAGER SYSTEM 

130XE Computer with 128K 
RAM, 1050 Disk Drive with DOS 
2.5 and Ramdisl< utility, Home 
Manager Kit including Family 
Finances soft- 
ware and Home 
Filing Manager 



$149.99 

reg. $230 
SAVE $80 



$349.99 

reg. $375 
SAVE $25 



PERSONAL 
PRODUCTIVITY SYSTEM 

800XL computer with 64K RAM, 
1050 Disk Drive with DOS 2.5, 
AtariWriter professional word 
processing software, VisiCalc 
spreadsheet financial calculator, TimeWise 

personal 
scheduler 



$299.99 

reg. $385 
SAVE $85 



/to ORDER: \- 

' Use handy order blank v 

I 
\ 



or use blank paper and list products I 

to be purchased, part #'s, and • 

enclose payment. I 

BUT PLEASE ACT NOW. ORDERS / 
\ ARE ON A FIRST COME BASIS. / 



INVENTORIES FOR MANY . 
V OF THE SPECIALS / 

^ ARE LIMITED! 



POSTERS 




Stargate 


$3.99 


Getaway 


3.99 


Atari Age 


3.99 


Silicon Valley 


3.99 


Pole Position 


3.99 


Space Station 


3.99 


Final Legacy 


3.99 


Future Maker 


3.99 


Lucasfilm 


3.99 



FINANCIAL/EDUCATIONAL/ — 
RECREATIONAL COMPUTER KITS 



BASIC TUTOR ADD-A- 

PACK-KX7099 

Invitation to Prog. I, II, Inside 
Atari Basic Book, 101 
Programming Tips & Tricks 
with Cassette 

HOME MGR. KIT-CX418 

Family Finances Home Filing Mgr. 

ARCADE CHAMP-KX7102 

Pac Man & Qix in cartridge 
holder. 2 X-Y 
Joystick Controllers 

EDUCATOR KIT-CX482 

410 Recorder, 
Basic Cart, States 
& Capitals 



$1999 

$24,99 

$1999 



$19. 



99 



2600 and 5200 PACKAGES 



2600 
CX22 
CX26118 
CX2676 

2600 

CX2675 

CX2684 

CX2691 

CX2692 

5200 
CX5203 
CX5240 
CX5221 

5200 
CX55 



CX5203 
CX2675 



Videogame Console 
TrakBall 
Millipede 
Centipede 



Videogame 
Mx. Pac-Man 
Galaxian 
Joust 
Moon Patrol 



Save $25 
Pgk. 1 $69,99 



Pkg.2 



Save $48 
$69.99 



Videogame Console 
Super Breakout 
Joust 
Berzerk 



Save $37 

pks 1 589.99 



Videogame Console 
VCS Cartridge Adaptor- 
enables you to play all 
2600 software 
Super Breakout 
Ms. Pac-Man Pkfl 



Save $45 

2 599.99 



POWER WITHOUT THE PRICE 



COMPUTER SOFTWARE FOR 800, 600 XL, 800 XL, 130 XE PERSONAL COMPUTERS 



BUSINESS AND PRODUCTIVITY 




Word Processor 






RX8036 Atariwriter 


Cart 


$39.99 


Spreadsheet 






DX5049 VisiCalc 


Disk 


29.99 


Database 






CX415 Home File Manager 


Disk 


24.99 


ACW250 Codewriter 


Disk 


49.99 


CWH200 Filewriter 


Disk 


29.99 


CWR200 Reportwriter 


Disk 


29.99 


CWM200 Menuwriter 


Disk 


29.99 


Home Finances 






CX421 Family Finance 


Disk 


$29.99 


CWHI200 Home Integrator 


Disk 


29.99 


CX418 Home Manager Kit 


Disk 


59.99 


Accounting 






CWBI200 Small Business Inv. 


Disk 


$14.99 


CWSE200 Salesman's Expenses 


Disk 


14.99 


CWRP200 Accts. Recv/Payable 


Disk 


14.99 


CWRI200 Retail Invoice 


Disk 


14.99 


Calendar 






DX5047 Timewise 


Disk 


$14.99 



EDUCAIIUN 






Music 






CXL4007 Music Composer 


Cart 


$24.99 


AX2020 Music 1 


Disk 


24.99 


AX2026 Music II 


Disk 


24.99 


Computer Skills 






0X483 Programmer Kit 


Cart 


$39.99 


0X4101 Invite to Prog. 1 


Tape 


7.50 


0X4106 Invite to Prog. II 


Tape 


7.50 


0X4117 Invite to Prog. Ill 


Tape 


7.50 


KX7099 Basic Tutor Kit 


Tape 


19.99 


Physical Sciences 






AED80013 AtariLab Starter Kit 






w/Temp. Module 


Cart 


$59.99 


AED80014 AtariLab Light Mod. 


Cart 


39.99 


0X4123 Scram 


Tape 


16. 


99 


Language Arts 








RX8059 Skywriter 


Cart 


$17. 


99 


0X4118 Convrstnl. German 


Tape 


17. 


99 


0X4119 Convrstnl. French 


Tape 


17. 


99 


0X4120 Convrstnl. Spanish 


Tape 


17. 


99 


CX4125 Convrstnl. Italian 


Tape 


17. 


99 


CX8135 My First Alphabet 


Disk 


17. 


99 


General 








0X4100 Touch Type 


Tape 


$16. 


99 


0X4126 Speed Reader 


Tape 


24. 


99 


RX8057 Typo Attack 


Cart 


17.99 


Early Learning Skills 






0X8137 Juggles Rainbow/ 


Disk 


19.99 


0X8138 Juggles House 


Disk 


19.99 


Creative 






DX5048 Paint 


Cart 


$24.99 











UTIUTIES AND LANGUAGES 


KX7097 


Logo Kit 


Cart $49.99 


CXL4018 


Pilot 


Cart 39.99 


AX2025 


Microsoft II 


Cart/Disk 29.99 


CXL4003 


Assem/Editor 


Cart 24.99 


CX8121 


Macro Assembler 


Disk 24.99 


CX8126 


Microsoft Basic 1 


Disk 59.99 



RECREATION ~ 
Action Games 

CXL4013 Asteroids 



CXL4004 

CXL4020 

RX8030 

CXL4024 

CXL4012 

CXL4027 

CXL4008 

CXL4011 

CXL4006 

RX8021 

CXL4025 

RX8044 

RX8049 

RX8048 

RX8052 

CXL4022 

RX8045 

RX8033 

RX8026 

RX8043 

RX8034 

RX8067 

KX7101 

KX7102 

Sports 

RX8029 R.S. Football 

RX8042 Tennis 
RX8069 Track and Field 

Strategy/Adventure 

CXL4009 Chess 

RX8039 Eastern Front 

CWA200 Adventure Writer 

CWSV200 Star Voyager 



Basketball 

Centipede 

E.T 

Galaxian 

Missile Command 

Qix 

Space Invaders 

Star Raiders 

Super Breakout 

Caverns of Mars 

Defender 

Joust 

Jungle Hunt 

Millipede 

Moon Patrol 

Pac Man 

Pengo 

Robotron 

Dig Dug 

Ms. Pac Man 

Pole Position 

Final Legacy 

Entertainer Kit 

Arcade Champ Kit 



Cart 
Cart 
Cart 
Cart 
Cart 
Cart 
Cart 
Cart 
Cart 
Cart 
Cart 
Cart 
Cart 
Cart 
Cart 
Cart 
Cart 
Cart 
Cart 
Cart 
Cart 
Cart 
Cart 
Cart 
Cart 

Cart 

Cart 
Cart 

Cart 

Cart 
Disk 
Disk 



$16.99 
16.99 
16.99 
16.99 
16.99 
16.99 
16.99 
16.99 
16.99 
16.99 
19.99 
19.99 
19.99 
19.99 
19.99 
19.99 
19.99 
19.99 
19.99 
19.99 
19.99 
19.99 
19.99 
24.99 
24.99 

$16.99 
16.99 
29.99 

16.99 
16.99 
24.99 
14.99 



-^ 



MOBILES 

Centipede $4.99 

Ms. Pac Man 4.99 

E.T 4.99 

BAGS 

Safari Duffle $9.99 

Totebags 9.99 

Backpacks 9.99 

T SHIRTS 

Adult (various) $6.99 

Youth 6.99 



/ TO ORDER: '^ 

I Use handy order blank \ 
/ \ 

•or use blank paper and list products i 
I to be purchased, part #'s, and I 
' enclose payment. / 

\ BUI PLEASE ACT NOW. ORDERS 

\ ARE ON A FIRST COME BASIS. / 
\ INVENTORIES FOR MANY j 

V OF THE SPECIALS / 



ARE LIMITED! 



y 



POWER WITHOUT THE PRICE 



ATARI COMPUTER CONTROLLERS " 

CX21 Touch Pad Controllers-Alpha Numeric S9.99 

CX22 TrakBall-Proline 14.99 

CX30 Paddle Controller 9.99 

CX40 Joysticks 6.99 

CX40P JoystickPair (CX40's in one box) 17.99 

0X41 Joystick Repair Kit 3.99 

0X43 Space Age Joystick 9.99 

0X75 Light Pen 39.99 

0X77 Touch Tablet 44.99 

OX80 TrakBall-HCD 14.99 

0X85 Numeric Keypad 24.99 



ATARI COMPUTER SOFTWARE 



COMPUTER CABLES 




AND ACCESSORIES 




0X82 Black/White Monitor Cable 


24.99 


0X853 16K RAM Module for 800 Computer 


19.99 


0X86 Printer Cable 


24.99 


CX87 Modem Cable 


24.99 



ATARI COMPUTER AND 




PERIPHERALS 




800 XL 


64K Computer 


99.99 


130 XE 


128K Computer 


149.99 


1050 


5V4 Disk Drive 


199.99 


1027 


Letter Quality Printer 


199.99 


1020 


Printer Plotter-40 Column 


49.99 


1010 


Cassette Record for 130 






XE/800 XL 


49.99 


850 POBA 


Interface Module (PC Board) 


49.99 


830 


Acoustic Modem + CXL4015 
Telelink Cartridge 


24.99 


825 


Printer 


79.95 


410 


Cassette Recorder for 






800 Computer 


19.99 



ATARI PROMOTIONAL ITEMS 



Breakout Scarfs 
Breakout Hats 
Centipede Buttons 
Frisbees 



$6.99 

4.99 

.99 

6.99 



/ TO ORDER: \ 

I Use handy order blank v 
I * 

'or use blank paper and list products I 

I to be purchased, part #'s, and 

' enclose payment. / 

V mi PLEASE ACT NOW. ORDERS / 
. ARE ON A FIRST COME BASIS. / 
\ INVENTORIES FOR MANY / 
V OF THE SPECIALS ^ ^ 

^ ARE LIMITED! / 



CXL4015 

0X41 04 

DX5047 

0X4129 

OX4130 

0X4114 

CX4110 

0X14007 

OXL4013 

OXL4004 

CXL4020 

OXL4009 

OXL8030 

RX8030 

OXL4008 

CXL4006 

AED80001 

AED80002 

AED80003 

AED80004 

AED80005 

AED80006 

AED80007 

AED80008 

AED80009 

AED80010 

AED80011 

AED80016 

AED80017 

AED80020 

AED80021 

AED80022 

AED80033 

AED80034 

AED80047 

AED80048 

AED80049 

AED80050 

AED80051 

AED80052 

AED80052 

AED80054 

AED80055 

AED80056 

AED80057 

AED80058 

AED80059 

AED80060 

AED80061 

AED80062 

AED80066 

AED80067 

AED80069 

APX 20235 

APX 20236 

APX 20059 

APX 20078 

APX 20100 

APX 20144 

APX 20182 

APX 20192 

APX 20223 

APX 20132 

APX 20262 

DX505 

0X8106 

CX8107 

OX8108 

0X8126 



Telelink Cart 

Mailing List Tape 

Timewise Disk 

Juggles Rainbow Tape Tape 

Juggles House Tape Tape 

European Cities, Countries Tape 

Touch Typing Tape 

Music Composer Disk 

Asteroids Cart 

Basketball Cart 

Centipede Cart 

Chess Cart 

E.I Cart 

Qix Cart 

Space Invaders Cart 

Super Breakout Cart 

Spelling in Context/1 Disk 

Spelling in Oontext/2 Disk 

Spelling in Oontext/3 Disk 

Spelling in Context/4 Disk 

Spelling in Context/5 Disk 

Spelling in Context/6 Disk 

Spelling in Oontext/7 Disk 

Spelling in Context/8 Disk 

Math Facts and Games Disk 

Concentration Disk 

Division Drill Disk 

US Geography PGK/CK Marc Disk 

US Geography PK/High Marc Disk 

Secret Formula-Elementary Disk 

Secret Formula-Intermedia 

Secret Formula-Advanced 

Screen Maker 

Player Maker 

Instruct Computing Demo 

Music 1/Term Notations 

Music ll/Rhythm & Pitch 

Music Ill/Scales & Chords 

Elementary Biology 

Earth Sciences 

Geography 

Prefixes 

Metric & Problem Solving 

The Market Place 

Basic Arithmetic 

Graphing 

Pre-Reading 

Counting 

Software for Your Atari 

Atari Games & Recreations 

Expeditions 



$4.99 



Spelling Bee 

Word Games 

Excalibur 

Kangaroo 

Data Manager 

Astrology 

Advanced Music 

Map Maker 

Magic Melody 

AT Speller 

Printer Drivers 

Gallahad and the Holy Grail 

ATspeller/ Atari writer 

Mickey, Great Outdoors 

Bond Analysis 

Stock Analysis 

Stock Charting 

Microsoft Basic I 



Disk 

Disk 

Disk 

Disk 

Disk 

Disk 

Disk 

Disk 

Disk 

Disk 

Disk 

Disk 

Disk 

Disk 

Disk 

Disk 

Disk 

Disk 

Book 

Book 

Disk 

Disk 

Disk 

Disk 

Disk 

Disk 

Disk 

Disk 

Disk 

Disk 

Disk 

Disk 

Disk 

Disk 

Disk 

Disk 

Disk 

Disk 

Oart 



99 
99 
99 
99 
99 
99 
99 
99 
99 
99 
99 
99 
99 
99 



6.99 

6.99 

6.99 

6.99 

6.99 

6.99 

6.99 

6.99 

6.99 

6.99 

6.99 

6.99 

6.99 

6.99 

6.99 

6.99 

6.99 

6.99 

6.99 

6.99 

6.99 

6.99 

6.99 

6.99 

6.99 

6.99 

6.99 

6.99 

6.99 

6.99 

6.99 

6.99 

6.99 

6.99 

6.99 

6.99 

6.99 

6.99 

6.99 

6.99 

6.99 

6.99 

6.99 

6.99 

6.99 

9.99 

9.99 

9.99 

9.99 

9.99 

9.99 

9.99 

9.99 

9.99 



POWER WITHOUT THE PRICE 



2600 VIDEOGAME PRODUCTS 






CX2600 


Video Computer System 


49.99 




CX21 


Touch Pad Controller— Alpha 








Numeric 


9.99 




CX22 


Irak Ball— Proline 


14.99 




CX30 


Paddle Controller 


9.99 




CX40 


Joysticks 


6.99 




CX40P 

CX41 


Joystick Pair (CX40's) j^|k 
Joystick Repair Kit flip; 


11.99 




3.99 




CX42 


Remote Control Joysticks (2 per 








pkg) 


14.99 




CX43 


Space Age Joystick 


9.99 












SOFTWARE 






CX2681 


Battlezone 


14.99 




CX2676 


Centipede 


14.99 




CX2684 


Galaxian 


14.99 




CX26127 


Gremlins 


14.99 




CX2691 


Joust 


14.99 




CX2688 


Jungle Hunt 


14.99 




CX2689 


Kangaroo 


14.99 




CX2692 


Moon Patrol 


14.99 




CX2699 


Taz 


14.99 




CX26110 


Crystal Castles 


$22.99 




CX26120 


Stargate 


22.99 




CX2677 


Dig Dug 


22.99 




CX2675 


Ms. Pac-Man 


22.99 




CX2694 


Pole Postion 


22.99 




CX26125 


Track & Field 


$26.99 




KIDS 








CX26103 


Alpha Beam 


$16.99 




CX26104 


Big Bird's Egg Catch 


16.99 




CX26101 


Oscar's Trash Race 


16.99 




CX26114 


Pigs in Space 


16.99 




CX26111 


Snoopy and the Red Baron 


16.99 





5200 SUPERSYSTEM PRODUCTS 



CX5200 
CX50 

CX530 
CX55 



Supersystem $79.99 
Keyboard Controller— Alpha 

Numeric Keypad 9.99 

TrakBall Controller 19.99 

VCS Cartridge Adaptor 24.99 



SOFTWARE 



CX5210 

CX5206 

CX5205 

CX5236 

CX5212 

CX5209 

CX5207 

CX5213 

CX5214 

CX5232 

CX5204 

CX5205 

CX5203 

CX5221 

CX5215 

CX5253 

CX5218 

CX5240 

CX5222 

CX5241 

CX5208 

CX5225 

CX5211 

0X5243 

CX5217 

0X5216 



Countermeasure 

Galaxian 

Missile Command 

Pengo 

Qix 

R.S. Baseball 

R.S. Football 

R.S. Soccer 

R.S. Tennis 

Space Dungeon 

Space Invaders 

Star Raiders 

Super Breakout 

Berzerk 

Centipede 

Choplifter 

Defender 

Joust 

Jungle Hunt 

Kangaroo 

Pac-Man 

Robotron 

Dig Dug 

Ms. Pac-Man 

Pole Position 

Vanguard 



$16.99 
16.99 
16.99 
16.99 
16.99 
16.99 
16.99 
16.99 
16.99 
16.99 
16.99 
16.99 
16.99 

$19.99 
19.99 
19.99 
19.99 
19.99 
19.99 
19.99 
19.99 
19.99 

$22.99 
22.99 
22.99 
22.99 



ATARI ORDER FORM 



PHONE 



ADDRESS 



CITY 



STATE 



Please allow up to six weeks for delivery. 



DESCRIPTION 



ZIP 



PRICE 



Use blank paper for additional items. 

D Check or money order enclosed. 
D VISA or G MasterCard 



I Exp. 



Signature 



Mail order form and payment to: 

Atari Bonanza 

P.O: Box 3427 
Sunnyvale CA 94088 



# ORDERED 



SUB 
TOTAL 



CALIF. RESIDENTS 
ADD 6.5% 
SALES TAX 



TOTAL 



$ 



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assembly lansuase I 

FINE SCROLLING 
WORLD: PART II 

Dot-by-dot screen moves, 
8 times smoother! 



by MARK ANDREWS 



2he amdiisioii ofci two/uni tutorial 
on assembly language scrolling, by 
the author oj Atari Roots. You'll 
learn how to program screens that 
scroll with professional smoothness, 
by controlling the Atari's scrolling 
registers and titrtical blank interrupt 
vectors. Ihe clenionstratio)! program 
is written in assembly language and 
requires either the MAC/65 assembler 
((). S. S. ) or Ihe Atari Assembler Hclitor 
It will run on all Atari H-hit com- 
puters, with disk or cassette. Ibis 
series is intended for programmers 
with at least an introductory 
knowledge of assembly language. 



The reason fine scrolling works so 
smoothly is that it has eight times the 
resolution of coarse scrolling. When 
coarse scrolling is used in a program, 
it causes lines of text to jump across 
the screen (or up and down) one full 
character at a time. But when fine 
scrolling is used, text can be moved 
around the screen one eighth of a 
character at a time. Here's how that 
works. 

Look closely at a text character on 
your video screen, and you'll see that 
it's made up of a matrix of tiny dots. 
If you had a magnifying glass, you'd 
be able to see that there are 64 dots 
in each character — eight rows of dots 
(or scan lines) high, and eight rows of 
dots (or color clocks) across. And 



these rows of dots — scan lines and 
color clocks — are the increments used 
in fine scrolling. 

To create and implement a fine 
scrolling routine, several steps are re- 
quired. First, you must go to your 
display list and enable fine scrolling 
by setting certain bits in the LMS in- 
struction that appears before every 
line you want to scroll. When bit 4 
of an LMS instruction is set, the line 
that follows the LMS instruction can 
be scrolled horizontally. When bit 5 
of an LMS instruction is set, the line 
that follows the LMS instruction can 
be scrolled vertically If both bit 4 and 
bit 5 of an LMS instruction are set, the 
line that follows the instruction can 
be scrolled both horizontally and 
vertically. 

TYPING IT IN 

Type in Listing 1. If you've got the 
listing from last month's scrolling 
demo, you can edit and expand it to 
create this month's listing. Those with 
MAC/65 can use the listing as is. Atari 
Assembler Editor owners should sub- 
stitute the alternate lines in Listing 2. 
Antic Disk subscribers will find the 
MAC/65 source code under the file- 
name FINESCRL. M65, and the object 
code as FINESCRL. EXE. If you have 
the Atari Assembler Editor, you must 
type in the alternate lines from Listing 
2. To run the object code from DOS 



2, type [L] [RETURN] FINESCRL.EXE 
[RETURN]. 

ENABLING 

Take a look at lines 340 through 390 
in the program you just typed, and 
you'll see that the LMS instruction 
preceding the line which I've labeled 
SCROLN (the line that scrolls) is §57. 
Most LMS instructions, as we have 
seen, begin with the digit 4. Why, 
then, does this one begin with the 
digit 5? 

The number $47, expressed in bi- 
nary notation, is 0100 0111. Bit 4 of 
that binary number is a zero and, 
therefore, not set. This means hori- 
zontal fine scrolling is not enabled. If 
you set bit 4, the number becomes 
0101 0111 (or S57) and horizontal fine 
scrolling is enabled. And that's why 
the last byte in line 380 of Listing 1 
is 157. 

Now suppose you wanted to scroll 
SCRLN vertically instead of horizon- 
tally. Wliat would you do? Well, you'd 
simply set bit 5 of the LMS instruc- 
tion in line 380. Then the S57 that 
ends that line would become S67 — or 
in binary notation, 0110 0111. If you 
wanted to enable both horizontal and 
vertical scrolling of the line, you'd 
simply change the last value in Une 
380 to »77 (0111 0111). 

Fine scrolling, like coarse scrolling, 
can be performed on any number of 
lines of text on your screen. Just set 



72 



ANTIC, The Atari Resource 



1 



assembly languase 



the appropriate bits in the proper LMS 
instructions, and the desired type of 
scrolling can be implemented for each 
selected line. 

But what if a display list contains 
no LMS instruaion for a line you want 
to scroll? Well, in that case, you could 
simply write one. There's no reason 
a display list can't have an LMS in- 
struction for every line on the screen. 
In fact, when an entire screen is to be 
scrolled, a separate LMS instruction 
must be used for each line that ap- 
pears on the screen. 

IMPLEMENTATION 

So far, all we've talked about is how 
to enable fine scrolling. But once fine 
scrolling has been enabled, how is it 
implemented? 

When fine scrolling of a line is 
enabled, control of the line is handed 
over to one of two scrolling registers 
that reside in your Atari's operating 
system. If you have authorized a hor- 
izontal scroll on a given line of a 
display, then that line becomes sub- 
ject to the control of a horizontal 
scroll register, which is abbreviated 
HSCROL and is at memory address 
80404. 

When a vertical scroll has been 
enabled for a given display-list line, 
that line becomes subject to the con- 
trol of a vertical scroll register, or 
VSCROL, at address SD405. If both 
horizontal and vertical scrolling of a 
given line are enabled, then that line 
becomes subject to the control of 
both the HSCROL and the VSCROL 
registers. 

After control of a line has been 
turned over to HSCROL, VSCROL, or 
both, you can implement fine scrolls 
by loading a value into the appropriate 
scrolling registers. When you load a 
number into the HSCROL register, 
ever)' display list line that has been put 
under the control of that register will 
be shifted to the right by the number 
of color clocks loaded into HSCROL. 



Load a number into the VSCROL reg- 
ister, and every line for which a ver- 
tical scroll has been enabled will be 
scrolled upward by the number of 
scan lines you have specified. 

If both horizontal and vertical 
scrolling of a given line are enabled, 
you can move that line left, right, up 
or down by loading appropriate 
values into both HSCROL and 
VSCROL. 

COMBINATIONS 

There is one hitch, though. The 
scrolling registers are eight bits, and 
only four of the eight bits in each 
register are used. That means that fine 
scrolling can be taken only so far. To 
work properly, fine scrolling must be 
combined with coarse scrolling. 

The best way to combine fine and 
coarse scrolling is to fine scroll a line 
or column of characters by seven col- 
or clocks or scan lines, and then reset 
the appropriate fine scrolling register 
to its initial value and implement one 
coarse scroll. Loop through this kind 
of procedure over and over, and the 
result will be a smooth fine scroll. You 
can see how this procedure works by 
studying and experimenting with 
Listing 1. 

PERFECT SCROLLING 

That's all there is to fine scrolling — 
if you don't mind putting up with a 
jerk, a jump or a smear every now and 
then on your screen. But if these 
kinds of messy situations don't appeal 
to you . . . Well, we've come this far 
— we might as well go on and talk 
about how to make fine scrolling 
perfect. 

As you may know, your computer's 
screen display is redrawn by an elec- 
tron gun 60 times every second. Be- 
tween each of these screen refresh 
cycles, there's a split-second total 
screen blackout that takes place too 
rapidly for you to see. 



So when you write a fine scrolling 
routine without taking special precau- 
tions, some of the scrolling action that 
you've programmed may take place 
while your display is actually being 
drawn on your screen. And this will 
usually result in unsightly jerks and 
smears. 

Fortunately there is a way to keep 
this from happening. The folks who 
designed your Atari have provided 
something called a vertical blank in- 
terrupt (VBI) vector. Learn how to use 
that vector, and you can perform all 
kinds of graphics tricks in real time 
without messing up your display. 

A vector is a pointer in your com- 
puter's operating system that contains 
the address of a specific routine. The 
main purpose of a vector is to offer 
an easy method for implementing 
often-used routines. When you jump 
to an OS vector during the course of 
a program, your program will 
automatically jump to the OS routine 
that the vector points to, and you can 
thus implement that routine without 
having to rewrite all of the code that 
it contains. 

Vectors can sometimes be used in 
another way. Sometimes you can 
"steal" a vector. That is, you can 
change its value so that it points to a 
routine you've written yourself, rather 
than the OS routine it originally 
pointed to. 

This allows you to use a vector as 
an easy method for controlling the 
behavior of your computer's operat- 
ing system. Listing 1 contains one 
shamelessly stolen vector — a vertical 
blank interrupt vector called WBLKI 
which is accessed via a pointer at ad- 
dress $0222. (NOTE: There are actual- 
ly two vertical blank vectors — imme- 
diate and deferred. For the purposes 
of this article we will only deal with 
the immediate vertical blank vector.) 



continued next page 



October 1985 



73 



assembly languase I 



VBI VECTORS 

Here's how the WBLKI veaor works. 
Every time your Atari starts a vertical 
blank interrupt, it takes a look at the 
contents of the WBLKI pointer. If the 
program being processed does not 
make use of the WBLKI pointer, that 
pointer will contain nothing but an in- 
struction to jump to a predetermined 
memory address: specifically, 
memory location $E45F (SYSVBV). 
And memory location SE45F usually 
contains nothing but an instruction 
for your computer to continue its nor- 
mal processing. 

By stealing the W^BLKI vector, 
however, you can make it point to any 
routine you like — usually one you 
yourself have written. Then, 60 times 
every second, your computer will 
automatically process the routine 
whose address you have stored in the 
W^BLKI pointer. When your routine 
is finished, your computer will 
resume its normal processing. 

Once you understand how the 
WBLKI interrupt works, it isn't dif- 
ficult to steal them. Here's all you have 
to do: 

1. Write a short routine you would 
like to carry out during a vertical 
blank interrupt. 

2. Make sure that your routine ends 
with a jump to SYSVBV. 

3. Store the address of your routine 
at WBLKI. 

After these steps are taken, your 
computer will process your new 
routine 60 times every second — just 
before it begins each VBI interrupt. 

ONE MORE THING . . . 

There's just one more important fact 
that you should remember about VBI 
vector-stealing. After you've stolen a 
vector, there's a small chance that an 



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ABACUS SOFTWARE 25 

, .„u ■ f u f u ABBY'S HOUSE OF 

mterrupt will begm after the first byte discqUNT SOFTWARE ... 37 
of the pomter that you re usmg has 

been updated, but before the second AMERICAN TV 57 

byte has been changed. If that hap- ANTIC See Insert 

pens, it could crash your program. ATARI CORP. 68 69 70 71 BC 

But this possibility can be avoided by g ^ <- COMPUTERVISIONS . 80 
using a routine called SETVBV which qattcdicc ikiri i ir>cn 

begins at memory address SE45C. BATTERIES INCLUDED .... 3 

To use the SETVBV routine, first CSI 80 

load the 6502 Y register with the low CAPESTYLE SOFTWARE ..80 

byte ofthe address ofthe routine that COMPUCAT 80 

instructs your computer to begin a rOMPI in IIR R1 

vector-changing routine. Then load '>-'^'v\f UV-LUt3 o I 

the X register with the high byte of the COMPUTER CREATIONS ..78 

address. Next, load the accumulator COMPUTER MAIL ORDER . 54 

with a 6 — a number which Atari com- COMPUTER PALACE 39 
puter. recognize as a code for ™ki COMPUTER SOFTWARE 

routmes. Then do a JSR SETVBV, and -pp^.^p ,. 

your interrupt will be safely enabled. 

In Listing 1, the WBLKI vector is DATAMOST 42-43 

stolen in lines 830 through 860. The E & B COMPUTER 

thievery committed in those lines is SPECIALTIES 80 

quite straightforward. The address of END USERS GROUP 12 

the SCROLL routine at line 910 is slip- r~j pMTpDpDicpc 77 
ped into the WBLKI vector, and from _V. .,-- ^^. ,„, ,^,-* 1 „*■ Vx, 

then on, the Atari that is running ^AMES COMPUTERS PLAY 4 

Listing 1 will automatically call the GIZZMOZ, INC 75 

SCROLL routine 60 times per second, HAPPY COMPUTING 41 

thinking the routine is part of its own JCECO 80 

operating system. ^^^ SOFTWARE '.'.'.'.'.'.'. 15 

LOTSA BYTES 9 

Mark Andrews wrote Atari Roots, LYCO COMPUTING 2 

probably the finest introduction to MICROPROSE 29 

Atari assembly language. It has sold kxcxhi \Ar\D\-rr\K\c -ic 

. , . , ^ , ,, ... , , , . INtW nvJKi/.kJINb / D 

out, but hopefully will be back tn 

print fairly soon. Antic published ex- OPTIMIZED SYSTEMS .... 83 

cerpts from this book in November S.S.I 11 

and December 1984. SENECOM 75 

-- SIX FORKS SOFTWARE ... 80 

Ustln3onpage64 Q gOFT-RAK 81 

SOFTWARE DISCOUNTERS 50 

SOUTHERN SOFTWARE ... 57 

SUBLOGIC 33 

VIP TECHNOLOGIES 19 

WHITEHOUSE COMPUTER . 79 



This is provided as a convenience and as a courtesy 
to ad\ertisers. ANTIC does not guarantee accuracy 
or comprehensiveness. 



74 



ANTIC, The Atari Resource 



in 



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product reviews 




MYCHESS li 

Datamost 

20660 Nordhoff Street 
Chatsworth, CA 91311 
(818) 709-1202 
$29.95, 48K disk 

Reviewed by Scott Lewis 

Mychess II, originally developed for 
computers running the CP/M 
operating system, is the latest chess 
program to be converted for the Atari. 
Mychess II plays a good to very good 
game, and at $2995 is quite a bargain. 
The lowest three skill levels will not 
prove too difficult for anyone who 
has played much in amateur tourna- 
ments. But at the six higher levels it 
becomes quite a challenge. 

Mychess II has several features not 
commonly found on chess programs. 
For example, the back side of the disk 
contains 128 all-time classic games in- 
cluding Napoleon v. Bertrand, 1820 
and Alekhine v. Forrester, 1923. 

AH the usual features are provided, 
including game storage, retrieval and 
replay hints, notation and diagram 
displays and instant printout. A clear 




and precise Help screen is always 
available. 

The game screen can be toggled 
between a standard view-from-above 
and a unique 3-D display. Unfor- 
tunately, the 3-D representation is 
cluttered and unclear In fact, the 
graphics throughout this program are 
not especially good. The kings and 
queens are hard to tell apart and the 



color contrast between the two op- 
posing sides is equally confusing. 

Other minor problems were that 
the instruction book cracked and lost 
10 pages when I first opened it, and 
the disk label has already detached 
itself. But overall, Mychess II is quite 
a good chess program and well worth 
the price. 

CRUSADE IN i^Hl 
EUROPE 

by Sid Meier and Ed Sever, Ph.D. 
MicroProse Software 
120 Lakefront Drive 
Hunt VaUey MD 21030 
$39.95, 48K disk 

Reviewed by Rich Moore 

Crusade in Europe is a superb 
theater-level simulation of the cam- 
paign to liberate France during 
World War II. Authors Sid Meier and 
Ed Bever of MicroProse have done 
an excellent job keeping the player's 
wargaming role consistent with the 
functions of an actual campaign 
commander 

The game opens up with a "Pat- 
ton'-like graphic/sound introduction 
that can be cut short by pressing 
[START]. Either a joystick or the 
keyboard can be used to select op- 
tions, obtain information and give 
orders. 

The five main scenarios have a total 
of 14 variants: 

Battle for Normandy (5 variants) 

Race for the Rhine (2 variants) 

Operation Market-Garden (2 variants) 

Battle of the Bulge (4 variants) 

Battle for France (1 variant) 

You can play against a human op- 
ponent or the computer, choose the 
level of intelligence data about enemy 
forces, set handicaps and game speed, 
save the game in standard DOS files 
and even change parameters during 
the game. 



The detailed hi-res map scrolls 
horizontally and vertically through 
three screens showing England, 
France, Belgium, Holland and Ger- 
many. The map is light during 
daylight hours and dark at night. 

Both commanders have a variety of 
infantry, armor and headquarters 
units as well as supply depots. Addi- 
tionally the Allied commander has 
four air wings, and in some scenarios, 
paratroops. 

The German commander has 
powerful SS Panzer tank divisions 
backing up his main forces. The start- 
ing force lay-down is historical, and 
reinforcements and replacements fol- 
low their historical schedules. 

Play is continuous. If you don't act, 
the computer will! Also, any uncom- 
pleted orders in effect by either player 
will continue until the objective is ob- 
tained. Action may be frozen at any 
time — an often-used function when 
a week's activity can be simulated in 
an hour! 

Forces may be given any of four ac- 
tion commands: Move, Attack, De- 
fend or Reserve. Each of these com- 
mands may be given an objective. The 
unit will move to the designated point 
on the map, send its commander an 
"arrival message" and then attack, dig 
in, or wait for orders. 

The units all have some "artificial 
intelligence" to simulate reasonable 
action on the part of subordinate 
commanders. Forces will advance to 
press successful attacks, or dig in and 
defend against superior forces. They 
will also beat strategic retreats to fight 
another day — if they can reach a safe 
area before getting wiped out. 

The manual would be somewhat 
intimidating to a beginning waigamer, 
but it is very thorough and includes 
a great deal of historical background 
(read "hints") for all of the scenarios. 

I'd recommend getting used to the 
game by playing the "Liberation of 
Paris" variant of the Normandy 



76 



ANTIC, The Atari Resource 




product reviews 




scenario. This gives you plenty of 
time and some good historical 
"benchmarks" to gauge your prog- 
ress. To get the most practice, set up 
the game for two human players so 
you can control all the action! 

Crusade in Europe belongs in every 
wargamer's collection. Adventurers 
who like graphic role-playing games 
such as Ultima III would probably en- 
joy this too. If the other MicroProse 
"Command Series" wargames are this 
good, the company has a real string 
of winners. Now if they'd move the 
battle to sea . . . .* 

(*Ifthe sea battle request in the last 
line of this review puzzles you, we'll 
explain about our new reviewer Rich 
Moore, an Atari programmer since 
1980. In his professional life, he is 
Lieutenant Commander Richard 
Moore, Computer Simulation Model 
Manager for the Wargaming Depart- 
ment of the U.S. Naval War College. 
He also has over 1900 hours flying 
F-4 and F-14 jet fighters, plus a 
masters degree in operations 
research. Antic welcomes Com- 
mander Moore aboard. -ANTIC ED) 

MORE BASIC ^HH 
BETTING 

by James Jasper 
St. Martin's Press 
175 Fifth Avenue 
New York, NY 10010 
227 pages, paperbound 
$12.95 

Reviewed by Nat Priedland 

Chicago market research programmer 
James Jasper is a lifelong sports bet- 
tor who's written three popular books 
of type-in handicapping software. His 
first book came out before the 
microcomputer was widely available, 
and the author was forced to rely on 
calculator formulas. 

Now Jasper's latest. More BASIC 
Betting, includes "programming to 



win" for professional football, base- 
ball and basketball, plus horseracing. 
There's also a sensible money man- 
agement progam for bettors. 

All the programs are written in 
Apple II BASIC. The book also pro- 
vides a mail-order source of program 
disks at the hefty price of $119.95— 
and you'll still have to enter all the 
statistical data. 




However, Antic's technical staff 
does agree with the author's claim 
that any Atari owner with a moderate 
knowledge of BASIC should easily be 
able to adapt these programs. 

Between the programs are narrative 
chapters where the author raffishly, 
entertainingly and rather convincing- 
ly tells you about his wins or losses 
while betting with the programs. 

When Jasper details his bets for the 
first two weeks of the 1984 baseball 
season, he claims a 13% profit. He 
says that his latest NFL football 
"sociogram" program has a 63% 
overall winning record. 

He claims his basketball program 
never dropped below 59% accuracy 
and has gone as high as 66% per NBA 
season. He says that his horse racing 
program has consistently delivered 
12% profits. 

So is all this true? Obviously 
anybody who buys a betting program 
book is mainly concerned with win- 



ning money consistently. 

The problem with reviewing this 
kind of a book is that you really can- 
not verify the accuracy of the claims 
without typing in a great deal of 
sports statistical data and testing out 
the program for months. 

Since we don't have the manpower 
to go through all of that, this 
magazine makes no guarantee how 
successful the programs will be for 
you. 

All we can say is that James Jasper 
writes about sports betting quite 
believably and his program algorithms 
seem to make good sense. 

For example, his horse racing and 
dog racing programs convert standard 
racing form information into an over- 
all formula of "predicted beaten 
lengths" which is then automatically 
translated into betting odds. 

If you do use this book to get com- 
puter help during the coming football 
season, please send Antic a letter or 
email telling us how you made out. 




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October 1985 



77 



ATARI* 



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FOR 

PRICES 



39 

59 
69 
99 
59 
59 
109 
62 



FLOPPY DISKS AS LOW AS 59C EACH 

DISKETTES (2 box minimum) 10 per box 






Generic (SKC) 


Wabash 


Maxell 


Generic (Bulk) 


BASF (Ea.) 3y2" 


# Boxes 


SS/DD 


DS/DD 


SS/DD 


DS/DD 


SS/SD 


DS/DD 


SS/DD 


DS/DD 


SS/DD 


DS/DD 


2 


9.99 


11.99 


13.99 


19.99 


18.99 


27.00 


7.99 


9.99 


3.49 


4.99 


3-6 


8.99 


10.99 


12.99 


19.49 


17.99 


26.00 


6.99 


8.99 


3.19 


4.49 


7- 10 


7.99 


9.99 


11.99 


18.99 


16.99 


25.00 


5.99 


7.99 


2.99 


3.99 



Panasonic Printers, Slack 8 

Panasonic Printers, Color 1 1 

MONITORS 

Atan XC 141 (14" Composite 

Color) 
Atari XM 148(12" CALL 

Monochrnme 80 column, FOR 

low resolulionl PRICES 

AlariSM 124 |12 

Monoctirome, 80 column, 

higti resolution) 
Atari SC 1224 (12" RGB Colon 
Sanyo 12" Green Screen 79 

Sanyo 12" Amber Screen 79 

Monitor Cable 5 

Teknika l3'Color MJ 10 189 

MODEMS 

Atari 1030 Direct 300 BAUD 69 

Atari XM 301 Direct: 

Connect 300 BAUD CALL 

MPP-1000E Modem 79 

Signalman XII Modem 199 

R-Verter 39 

CompuServe Starter Kil 21 

850 Inlerface 114 

Anadex (Hayes Compatible) 239 

UPGRADES/ACCESSORIES 

Flip n File 10 4 

Flipn File 15 7 

Original Flip n File 50 14 

Flipn' File Carl Case' 12 

Library Cases! 10 colors) 4 

Disk S3nk,'5 Holds 50) 12 

Disk !;;ink ih.' ,s "Oi 5 

Power Strip (6 outletl 16 

Lineguard Spike Suppressor 1 3 

Disk Drive Cleaning Kit 6 
MicroMate Paper 

(20 # 540 sbeelsl 10 

Printer Stand (wire) 1 6 
Dust Covers Call for availability 

Disk Coupler inotcb) 3 

UPGRADES: 

Ram Rod X/L W/Omnimon 
Omniview for 8(10 XL 
US Doubler 
MPP64 K 
R-Time 8 Cartridge 



99 
49 
59 



COMPLETE LINE OF ATARI SOFTWARE 
CALL IF YOUR PROGRAM IS NOT LISTED!! 



SOFTWARE 

NEW ATARI PROGRAMS 

Codewriler 


, 39 
21 




21 






Home Integrator 

Small Business Inventory 


20 

,12 


Accounts Rec/Pay, , , , 


12 




12 


Final Legacy 


,,,15 
,., 18 


Star Voyager 


12 


EPYX 

Dragonnders of Pern (D) , , 

Summer Games 

Pitstop 11(D) 

Ballblazer(D) 

Rescue on Fractalus (D) 

Temple of Apshai (D) 

ACCESS 

Beach Heacl(D) 

ACTIVISION 

Decalhaton (Rl 

Pitfall II (R) 

Space Shuttle (Rl 

Ghost Busters (Dl 

BATTERIES INCLUDED 

Paperclip (D) ,, 


,,, 21 
28 

,,,28 

,.,28 
28 

, , 21 

,24 

18 

.,, 18 

18 

22 

41 






B/Graph 

BRODERBUND 

Printshop(D) 


,48 

,31 
21 


Stealth (Dl 

Whistler's Brother (D) 

DATASOFT 


21 
. 21 


Dadas Quest 


,24 


Letter-Wizard 

ELECTRONIC ARTS 


,52 


Pinball Construction (Dl , , , , 

IVIU L E, (D) 

Murder/Zinderneuf (D) 

One on One (D) 

Archon II (D) 


18 
18 

,, 18 
25 
25 

,,, 18 




18 


Hard Hat fvlack 

Seven Cities of Gold 

Cut and Paste 


14 

.25 
18 



INFOCOM 

Cul Throats (D) 24 

Deadline (D) 31 

Enchanter (D) 24 

Hitchhiker's Guide to 

the Galaxy (D) 24 

Infidel (D) 28 

Planetfall(D) 24 

Sea Stalker (Dl 24 

Sorcerer (Dl 28 

Slarcross(D) 31 

Suspect (D) 28 

Suspended (D) 31 

Witness (D) 24 

Zork 1(D) 24 

Zork II or III (D) 28 

Invisiclues Hint Books 7 

MICROPROSE 

F-1 5 Strike Eagle (D) 24 

fvtig Alley Ace (D) 24 

Solo Flight (Dl 24 

Kennedy Approach 24 

OSS 

Action (Rl 50 

Action Tool Kit (D) 19 

Basic XL(R| 38 

DOSXL(D) 19 

Basic XE 50 

Mac 65 (R) 50 

Mac/65 Tool Kit (D) 19 

Writer's Tool Kit 45 

Basic XL Tool Kil 19 

ORIGIN 

Ultima IIKDI 42 

SCARBOROUGH 

Masterlype 28 

Net Worlh 55 

SIERRA ON LINE 

Ultima I 24 

Ultima II 41 

SYNAPSE 

Ouasimodo 17 

Alley Cat 14 

Syn-File+ 35 

Syn-Calc 35 

Syn-Trend 28 

Syn-Comm 28 

Syn-Stock 28 

Mindwheel (needs 2 drives) , , , Call 

TRONIX 

SAM 42 




To order call TOLL FREE 

1-800-824-7506 



ORDER LINE ONLY 



COMPUTER CREATIONS, Inc. 

P.O. BOX 493 - DAYTON, OHIO 45459 

For information, order inquiries, or for Ohio orders (5 1 3) 435-6868 
OrderLinesOpen9:00a,m,lo9:00p.m.Mon.-Fri.;10a.m.to4:00p.m, Sal,(Easlern Standard Time), Minimum $15 per order C.O.D. (add $3.00). Please specify computer system. Call 
toll free number to verify prices and availability of product. Prices and availability are subject to change without notice. We ship C.O.D. to Continental U.S. addresses onlyl Hardware 
requires additional freight charges(min, $4,00), Software and accessories add $3,00 shipping and handling in Continental U.S. Actual freight will be charged outside U.S. to include 
Canada. Alaska. Hawaii. Puerto Rico and APO. Ohio residents add 6% sales lax. Canadian orders add 5% shipping, (min. $5.00). All otherforeign orders, please add 1 5% shipping, (min. 
$10). For immediatedelivery send cashier'scheck. money order ordirectbanklranslers Personal andcompany checks allow3 weeks toclear. School purchase orders welcome. Due 
to our low prices, all sales are final. NO CREDITS. All defective returns must have a return authorization number Please call (5 1 3) 435-6868 to obtain an RA# or your return will not be 
accepted for replacement or repair. 






ELECTRONIC ONE 



ATARI COMPUTER HARDWARE 

ATARI 800XL 88,00 

ATARI1200XL 58.00 

ATARI 520ST 3V2" Disk 

DRIVE, R.G.B. COLOR 818,00 

DISK DRIVES 

ATARI 1050 148,00 

INDUSG,T 208,00 

CENTURIAN810 158,00 

PRINTERS 
STARSG10 238,00 

PANSONIC1091 238,00 

EPSON LXBO 238,00 

ATARI 1027 178,00 

ATARI 1025 148,00 

ATARI 1020 , 38,00 

APE FACE INTERFACE 49,99 

UPRINT 54,99 

U PRINT 16K BUFFER 79,99 

ATARI COMPUTER HARDWARE 
TOUCH TABLET 42,99 

1030 MODEM 69.99 

MPP1000E MODEM 69,99 

ATARI LAB STARTER KIT , , , ,44,99 
TENICKA 13" COLOR 

MONITOR 198,00 

AMDEC 300 COLOR 228,00 

SAKATA 13" COLOR 168,00 

ATARI KEY PAD 24,99 

COMPUSERVE STARTER KIT 18,99 

SPECIAL 

ATARI 130XE 
COMPUTER 
77 



129. 



;i^. 



ELECTRONIC 
ONE 



THE 

LOWEST 

PRICES 

THE 

BEST 
SERVICE 



CALL 

(614)864 9994 

'O, Box 1342B • Columbus, Oh 43213 

ATARI COMPUTER SOFTWARE 

ATARI WRITER 29,99 

PAPERCLIP 36,99 

ACTION 59,99 

BASIC XL 54,99 

BASIC XE 54,99 

LOGO 32,99 

MICRO SOFT BASIC II , 34,99 

CONV LANGUAGE 14.99 

SYNFILE 34.99 

SYN CALC 34.99 

SYN TREND 26.99 

ASSEMBLER EDITOR 19.99 

MACRO ASSEMBLER 19.99 

PRINT SHOP 27.99 

BASIC CARTRIDGE 6.99 

CENTIPEDE 9.99 

RIVER RAID 9.99 

PITFALL II 9.99 

GAME-STAR BASEBALL 9.99 

MINER 2049ER 9.99 

BOUNTY BOB STRIKES 29.99 

MILLIPEDE 9.99 

MS.PACMAN 9.99 

PACMAN 7.99 

STAR RAIDERS 7.99 

DONKEY KONG 9.99 

F 1 5 23 99 

ONE ON ONE.' .' .' . . .23.99 



HOW TO ORDER: CASHIER CHECK, MONEY ORDER, MASTERCARD" 
or VISA- (Add 4% for charge cards) ... NO PERSONAL CHECKS ... NO 
C.O.D.'S . . . SHIPPED U.P.S. PRICES SUBJECT TO CHANGE. 
SHIPPING: Prompt one day shipping on in-stock merchandise. Ohio resi- 
dents add 5.5% sales lax. Add $3.00 on all orders under $100.00 . . . Add 
$5.00 on all orders over $100.00. 

INTERNATIONAL; Actual freight charge on all orders outside the continen- 
tal United Stales including A. P.O. 

CALL OR WRITE FOR FREE CATALOG 




Tde ATARI'ResDurce 



October Disk 

BONUS 

Source Code 

(Graphic Utility Package) 

Complete assembly language listing 
for our popular June, 1985 program! 
(Requires either MAC/65 or Atari Assem- 
bler Editor) 



WHITE HOUSE COMPUTER 

P.O. Box 4025, Williamsport, PA 17701 

"Where Prices Are Born, Not Raised" 

TOLL FREE 1 -800-351 -3442 

PA CALL 1-71 7-322-7700 

— PA Residents FREE Shipping — 



PRINTERS 

ATARI 

XTM 201 Non-Impact Dot Matrix 99.95 

XTC 201 Color Non-Impact Dot Matrix 109.95 

XDM 121 Daisy Wheel -....209.95 

XMM 801 Dot Matrix Impact 169.95 

STC 504 Color/Non Impact 1 3995 

STD 1 2 1 Daisy Wheel 2 1 9.95 

SMM 801 Dot Matrix/Impact 279.95 



OKIOATA 

182 219.95 

84 640.95 

192 349.95 

193 525.95 



EPSON 

LX 80 239.00 

FX 80+ 339.00 

JX 80 479 00 

RX 100 369,00 

FX100-I- 489.00 

LQ 1500/P 995,00 

PANASONIC 

1090 137.00 

1091 237.00 

1092 385.00 

1093 425.00 

3151 455,00 

STAR MICRONICS LEGEND 

SG 10 214.00 1380 269.00 

SG 1 5 379 00 1 385 305.00 

SD 10 345.00 880 199.00 

SD IS 450 00 1 080 229 00 

SR-10 485.00 

SR-15 585.00 

Powertype 307 00 C.ITOH 

8510-A 285.00 



CITIZEN 

MSP- 10 305.00 

MSP- 15 450.00 

MSP-20 450.00 

MSP-25 575.00 



INTERFACES 

850 108.95 

U-PrinI w/port 49.95 

U-PrinI w/16l( 69.95 

U-Prinl w/64k 89.95 

PRINTER PAPER 

2500 Shts LazorEdge. . .24.95 

500 Shis Lazor Edge 9.95 

1 000 Shts Lazor Edge ... 1 4.95 

DISKETTES 

SKC Lifetime Warn 

SS/DD 10,95 

DS/DD 14.95 

BONUS Lilelime Warn 

SS/DD 9.50 

DS/DD 13.50 

MAXELL 

MDl 15.95 

MD2 20.95 

MODEMS 

MPP lOOOE 69.95 

Volks 12 179.95 

Hayes 300 149.95 

Hayes 1200 385.95 

SYMPHONIC VHSVCR 
$279.00 



[MONDAY - FRIDAY 9 AM - 6 PM 
VISA & MC ACCEPTED 4% 



J POLICY: No deposit on COD orders ftoo froighl on all prepaid cash 
orders over S,300 in the continental USA. APO & FPO add S5.00 per 
hundred. For priority mail add S8 00 per hundred PA residents add 6°. 
sales tax. Defective products must have Prior RA number. Schools net 1 5 



COMPUTERS 

800 XL 

130 XE 

520 ST Color RGB Monitor & More 

520 ST Monochrome Monitor & More 



.89.95 
. 139.95 
.870. 95 
. 749.95 



DISK DRIVES 



Indus GT 

1050 

Happy 1050 

Happy Enhancer. 



.205.95 
. 164.95 
.336.95 
.160.95 



MONITORS 

TEKNIKA 

MJ-IOColor 185.95 

MJ-22 RGB 265 95 

ZENITH 

ZVM 122 Amber 82.95 

ZVM ' 23 Green 75.95 

AMOEK 

300G 1 19.00 

300A 129.00 

Color 300 229.00 

Color 500 339.00 

Color 600 399.00 

Color 700 469.00 

Color 710 539.00 

310A 145.00 

XTRON 

Comcolor I 189.00 

NEC 

1201 139.95 

1205 139.95 

1260 97.95 

SAKATA 

SC-100 179.00 



SOFTWARE 

ATARI 

ProofreaiJer 19.95 

Codewriler 42.95 

Filewriter 24.95 

Reportwriter 24.95 

Menuwnter 24.95 

Small Bus. Inven 17.95 

Salesman's Expenses .... 1 7.95 

Accounts Rec/Pay 1 7.95 

The Learning Phone 23.95 

BRODERBUND 

Print Shop 28.95 

Graphics Library 1 17.50 

Graphics Library II 17,50 

SYNAPSE 

Synlile 32.95 

Syncalc 32.95 

Syntrend 27.95 

BATTERIES INCLUDED 

Paperclip/Spell Pk 69.95 

Paperclip 55.95 

Homepack 31.95 

Consultant 59.95 

Bus Card II 1 19 95 

Bl 30 Column Card 99.95 



October 1985 



79 




HALLEY HUNTER ! 



X 



X 



THE COMET IS COMING. . . 

And you can find it in your skies, 

armed with information from 

HALLEY HUNTER for your ATARI. 

Not a "Sky-Plot" Program, but a guide where 

to look in your SKY, NOT on your screen! 

FOR SUGGESTED DATES « YOUR LOCATION: 

' Comet Coordinates 

• Earth Sun, Earth Comet Distances 
' Predicted Brightness 

* Where to Look 

Direction on horizon S how high upf 
' Program Manual Packed with Tips & Hints: 
Best daiss to observe, where, when S how. 

CAPESTYLE SOFTWARE 

Box 531 

RFD 1 

Mashpee, MA 02649 



Dlsk& 

Manual 

only 14'"' 



Mail cashiers check, money order or personal check 

(allow 2 weeks to clear} add $2 shipping & handling, 

Mass add 5% state tf«x 



DISK-FIXtm 
disk utilities system 

Features Include: 

• File Recovery 

• Disk Recovery and Salvaging 

• Viewing / Editing of All Sectors 

• Disassembly of Mactiine Programs 

• Expanded Directory Display 

Now Only $39.95 

(add $2.00 postage/tiandling - Colorado 
residents add 3% sales tax) 

Oir©atiSw(i ioifiiwaiir© Ddlssis 
504 W. Grant Ave. 
Pueblo, CO 81004 

Requires ATARI 800* DOS 2.0Smin. 32K 
Dealer Inquires Invited 
' Trademark of ATARI, Inc. 



ICEPIC 

PRINTER INTERFACE 

WITH 

FEATURE-PACKED GRAPHICS SOFTWARE 

$49.95 POSTPAID 

• Direct-connect Atari to standard printer. 

• Works with 400/800, XL and XE models. 

• Supports parallel (Centronics) interface. 

• Complete; cable, diskette and users guide. 

• Uses one joystick port, no 850. 

• Prints incoming data from 850-type 
modems. 

• Prints (dumps) text and graphics screens 

• Atari and user fonts; many format variations. 

• EPSON and OKIDATA-92 compatible 
graphics. 

• Dump/restore screen to disk. 

• Special functions available from keyboard 
or by "printing" simple control sequences. 

• Many other highly useful functions. 

• 30 day money- back guarantee. 
Money order, check VISA or Mastercard. 
Write for brochure. Quantity discounts. 

ICECO 

Integrated Computer Equipment Co. 

8507 Natural Bridge Rd. 

St. Louis, IVlissouri 63121 

(314)423-3390 



Now available for the Atari 

ASSEMBLER and LINKER 

Software development using a linker 
is a tw/o-stage process. First, each source 
file is assembled to a "relocatable" file. 
Then the relocatables are combined into 
an executable file using the linker 

The computer industry has long 
recognized this two-stage process to be 
vastly superior to those that translate 
source code directly to executable form. 

Let us tell you more. Send for our 
brochure. 

Brochure $ 1.00 

Assembler, linker, 70-page manual, 
17-source sample program $39.00 

Hardware required: 48k, 1 disk, printer 

Six Forks Software 

11009 Harness Circle • Raleigh, NO 27614 

VISA and MasterCard accepted 




The Onlirte Catalog of Computers anij Software 

Our Prices are WHOLESALE + 10% 

SAMPLES!!! 

Star Micronics SG-10 Printer — $239 

Atari 850 Interface — $117 

Indus GT Disk Drive — $234 

Olympia RO Daisy Wheel Printer — $332 

Atari 1050 Disk Drive — $172 

Batteries Included Home Pak — $36 

ASK ABOUT OUR FREE PRICE LIST 
FREE SOFTWARE - FREE BULLETIN BOARD SERVICE 

(408) 353-1836 

We support the complete Atari product line. 

InslanI Shipping (or as fast as we can). Mastercard 4 Visa 
accepted (no extra charge). Shipping & handling add 6%. 
California customers add 6,5% sales tax. Order by phone 
Mon.-Fri, - 10 a.m. -5 p.m. PST) Order by modem daily 
6 p.m. -9 a.m.) from our online Telecatalog. 

Prices subject to change without notice. 

COMPUCAT 

24500 Glenwood Hwy., Los Gatos, CA 95030 



SPARE PARTS FOR 
YOUR ATARI 



Hard to find Integrated Circuits $5. each 
On CPU GTIA. ANTIC. CTIA. 

CPU 6502. CPU 6611 
On 10K OS IVIath ROM 399B. OS ROMs 

499B & 5998 

On 800/400 Mam Pol(ey. 6520 PIA 
On 610 & 850 MPU 6507. PIA 6532, 

RAM 6810. ROM C 

Field Service Manuals 800/400. 800XL or 810 $25 ea 
For 1050 or 1200XL $20 ea. For 410 or 835 $15 ea 
Diagnostic Cartridges Computer or Disk $25 ea 



^^^xxrputenrisioiis 

(408) 554-0666 

3400 El Camino Real, #1, 
Sania Clara, CA 950S1 

Hours Tuesday-Friday IGam- 7pm. 

Sat 10am-5pm 
Terms UPS Shipments within USA Add $5 COD 

or prepaid. Calit, Res. add 6'A% sales tax 



CCS. 



1 87 CROSBY AVE.. KENMORE. NY. 1 421 7 

716-873-4349 

FREE box of disks with purchase of an Atari 

800XL or 1 30XE AND disk drive 



Alari 800XL 




S 95.00 


Atari 130XE 




149.00 


1050 Disk Drive 




169.00 


1025 Printer 




159.00 


Alari 620ST package: 


Disk Drive, & 




B/W monitor 




S659.00 


Package with RGB color monitor 


S82900 


Other Disk Drives 






Indus! GT 




245.00 


Rena 1 000 




175.00 


Monitors 






BMC 12" gr. Oram 




99.96 


BMC 13" COLOR 




219.96 


Printers 






Lengend L880 




219.00 


Lengend L1080 




239.00 


Panasonic KXP 1090 




205.00 


Panasonic KXP 1091 




255.00 


Interfaces - We carry 


fylPP's and Digmal Device Prods, at 


low prices Special price when packaged w 


th printer. 


BONUS DISK BOX - 


11 SS/DDonly S10.50 




Others - BASF 10/boxSS/DD 


U.9B 


BASF 10/boxDS/DD 


16.96 



Write Of call for price list on Software, Hardware, and 

other Peripherals. 
Shipping: Add 2,50 for software; 5 00 for each hardware 

(or actual charges if less). International orders pay 

actual charges. 
Terms: No COD orders. All orders will be shipped UPS or 

best way. 
Sorry: No refunds or exchanges UNLESS defective, 



TURN YOUR ATARI 1030" 

MODEM INTO A HAYES" 

SMARTMODEM 

WITH 

INCREASE THE CABABILITY OF YOUR 1030 AND 
MAKE IT A POWERFUL COMMUNICATION TOOL. 
WITH SMART 1030 YOU CAN: 

* USE THE INDUSTRY STANDARD HAYES'" COMf^AND SET 

* UPLOAD/DOWNLOAD FILES DIRECTLY TO YOUR DISK DRIVE 

* PULSE OR TOUCH TONE™ DIAL 

* NO 850 INTERFACE t^ODULE'" REQUIRED. YET YOU CAN 
USE MOST TERMINAL SOFTWARE WRITTEN FOR THE 850 

* USE LONG DISTANCE NETWORKS 

* AUTO DIAL DIRECTLY FROM A DISK STORED BBS DATA BASE 
WHICH YOU CREATE 

SMART 1030 IS A MACHINE LANGUAGE HANDLER THAT 
ALLOWS YOUR 1030 OR 835 TO SIMULATE A HAYES™ 
SMARTMODEM. IT IS A MUST PROGRAM FOR ANY 1030 OR 
835 OWNER. INCLUDED FREE IS THE TERMINAL SOFTWARE 
PROGRAM AMODEM, WHICH SUPPORTS XMODEM 
PROTOCOL AND UNLIMITED FILE SIZE TRANSFER. 

E & B COMPUTER SERVICES $-| Q QC 

P.O. BOX 292506 • COLUMBUS, OHIO 43229 ' •'■•'W 

VISA OR MASTERCARD CALL 614-891-4614, OR MAIL CHECK 
(ALLOW TWO WEEKS FOR PERSONAL CHECKS TO CLEAR) WITH 
$2.00 FOR SHIPPING AND HANDLING. 



80 



ANTIC, The Atari Resource 



•Ji .Languages 



the 
2^^ attention 
you deserve 



Busin ess 
Educa tional 

Graphics 



A Receive our disk based catalog and 

pricebook. 
A Buy from people who specialize in ATARI 

exclusively. 
A Receive our 8 pg. newspapers 9 times a 

year filled with critiques, special tips, and 

classified ads. 
A Get at least 25% off all titles (and often 

morel). 
A Receive consistant low prices and prompt, 

knowledgeable service. 
A Choose from over 1,500 software items. 



JOIN 




800-MY-ATARI 



TO join by phone 

call toll free 

in Mass. call 617-879-5232 

Please have credit card number ready! 

Or return this coupon with $5.00* 



TM 



I CX 



YES. I vi/ant to be a preferred customer of 
CompuClub" Rush me my catalog and price 
book. Enclosed please find my $5.00 registration 

fee. 

Please make check payable to compuclub" 

payment enclosed ncheck nmonev order 

Bill my DMastercard nvisa Expires. ^ 

ID#^ . 



n 



Signature 

Name 

Address _ 



I Cil 



City 

Atari Model . 



_ State. 



-Zip. 



u 



Hours: Mon. - Fri 11 00 AM 7:00 PM Eastern time 
Answering services after nours 

CompuClUb'". P.O. 80X652, Natick ma 01760 
•Overseas memberehip $25.00 per year 
J^ Atari - Trademark of Atari Corporation 




ATARI COMPUTERS 

520 ST w/ 12"mono CALL 
520STw/12"rgb CALL 
260 ST CALL 

260 STD (w/ drive) CALL 
SF 354 {3, 5- drive) CALL 
130 XE CALL 

1010 Recorder $ 45 

Atari Joysticks (pair) $ 14 

COMPUTER SPECIALS 
aOOXLw/ 1050 drv % 259 
TelevideoTPC-1 $ 999 
Columbia PC-porl $1099 

PRINTERS 

All Epson Printers CALL 

All Okidata Printers CALL 

All Slar Printers CALL 

All Atan Printers CALL 
Okimate 10 w/ 

Interlace $199 

NEC JO- 121 5 color $199 

DISK DRIVES 

Atan 1050 CALL 

Indus GT w/ softwa CALL 

MONITORS 

Atan SMI 24 CALL 

Alan SC 1224 CALL 

Teknika 13" color $190 

Amdek 300 color $239 

MODEMS 

Atari 1030 w/SOtt. CALL 

Atari 850 Interlace CALL 

All Hayes Modems CALL 

DIGITAL DEVICES 
Ape Face XLP $ 59 

Ape Face 12XLP $59 
Ape Face XLPS $ 70 
U-Pnnt-A $69 

A16 Intertace/Bufler $ 99 

DISKETTES 

Ma>ellMD1 SS/DD $19 
Maxell MD2 DS/DD $ 37 
SKC SS/DD $11 

SKC DS/DD $ 14 

Wabash SS/DD $14 
Elephant SS/SD $14 
Elephant SS/DD $18 
Call tor Quanlity Prices 

CLASSIC COVERS 
1010 Recorder cov S 7 
1050 Drive cover S 7 
1025 Printer cover S 7 
1027 Pnnter cover $ 7 
800XL cover $ 7 

INNOV. CONCEPTS 

Data Case $11 

Flip 'N' File II $15 

WICO 

Ball Bat .Joystick $ 24 

ATARI SOFTWARE 

Accounts Rec/Pay $12 
Adventure Writer $ 18 



AtariLab Light 

Module (R) $ 34 
AIanLabStaner(Rj $45 



Rescue on 

Fractalus 
Summer Games 



$28 
S28 



$35 
$39 
$21 
$15 
$13 
$25 
$20 
$21 



AtariWnter (R) 

Codewnter 

Filewnter 

Final Legacy 

FoolballlR) 

Home Filing Mgr 

Home Inlegralor 

Menuwnler 

Microsoft Basic[RD) S 37 

Retail Invoice $12 

Salesman Expense $12 

Small Business 

Invenlofy S 12 

Star Voyager $12 

Track S Field (R) $ 25 

ACCESS 

Beach Head $ 24 

AMER. EDUCATIONAL 

All Titles S17 

BATTERIES INCLUDED 
B;Graph $ 48 

Homepak S 35 

Paperclip S 41 

BRODERBUND 

Bank St Writer $49 

Pnntshop S 31 

Graphics Library #1 $19 
Graphics Library »2 $19 

CBS SOFTWARE 

Big Bird's Special 

Delivery 5 19 
Ernie's Magic 

Shapes $19 
Success w. Math 

Series-AIITitles S19 



FIRST STAR 

Romper Room ABC $ 23 

Spy vs Spy $ 22 



INFOCOM 

Cullhroal 

Deadline 

Enchanter 

Inlidel 

Slarcross 

Suspend 

Witness 

ZorkI 

Zorkll 

Zork III 



$31 
$31 
S24 
$28 
S31 
S31 
S24 
S24 
$28 
$28 



MICROLEAGUE SPORT 

MicroLea Baseball S28 

MICROPROSE 

F.15 Strike Eagle S 24 

Kennedy Approach s 24 

Mig Alley Ace S 24 

Solo Flight S 24 

MINDSCAPE 

Crossword Magic S 36 

Halley Proiect S 36 

MUSE 

Beyond Castle 

Woltenstein S 24 

Castle Wolfenstein $ 20 



DATASOFT 

Bruce Lee 
Conan 
Dallas Quesl 
Dig Dug 
Letter Wizard 
Lost Tomb 
Pac Man 
Pole Position 
Spell Wizard 



$28 
$28 
S24 
$19 
$52 
$24 
$19 
319 
$35 



ELECTRONIC ARTS 



$18 
$25 
SIO 
$18 
$10 



Archon 

Archon II 

Axis Assassin 

Cut & Paste 

Debug 

Financial Cookbook $ 30 

Hard Hat Mack S 10 

M.ULE. $18 

Music Construction 

Set $18 

One On One $ 25 

Pinball Construction 

Set $ 18 

7 Cities of Gold $ 25 
Word Flyer $10 

W.O.RMS, $10 

Epyx 

Ball Blazer 
Pitstop II 



OSS 

Action (R) 

Action Toot Kit 

Basic XL IRI 

DOS XL 

SSI 

Field 01 Fire 

50. Mission Crush 

Kamplgruppe 

SUBLOGIC 

Flight Simulator II 

SyNAPSE 

Blue Max 

Blue Max 2001 

Essex 

Mindwheel 

SynCalc 

SynComm 

SynFile 

SynStock 

SynTrend 

Quasimodo 



TRONIX 

Chatterbee 
S.AM 

XEROX 

Stickybear ABC 
Stickybear Basket 
& Bounce 
Stickybear Bop 
Slickypr Numbers 



S62 
$25 
S50 
$25 

$30 
$30 
$45 



$24 

$21 

CALL 

CALL 

S35 

S28 

$35 

$28 

$28 

$17 

$28 
$42 



$25 
$25 
$29 



Stickybr Opposites $ 29 



$28 
$28 



To Order Call Toll Free: 1 (800) 545-01 1 1 
Orders Only Please! 

All Titles On Disk unless marked (R) tor ROM Cartridge. 
Ohio Residents and Customer Service Please Call: 1 (51 3) 322-6314 
Order Lines Open: 10 a.m. to 6 p.m. Mon. -Fri.; 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. Sat. (EST) 
Minimum $10 order. No extra charge for VISA or MasterCard. C.O.D. add $3. We 
prepay and add actual freight charges to all hardware orders. Software freigW 
charges: $1 0-$ 1 00 add $3; ll 01 -$250 add $5. Orders Over $250 Shipped FREE 
In Continental U.S. Actual Freight will be charged outside Continental U.S. and 
APO. Ohio residents add 6% sales tax. For immediate delivery use bank cards, 
cashier's check, or money order. Personal/Company checks allow 3 weeks to clear. 
School Purchase Orders welcome. Due to our low prices, all sales are final. NO 
CREDITS. All defective returns must have a return authorization number. Please 
write or call our Customer Service Number to obtain RA#. Send $2 for our Complete 
Catalog (refundable with purchase). 

P.O. Box 2052, Springfield, Ohio 45501 




new products 




GENIE wmmmmi^mm^^ 

(software) 

New Hori2»ns Software 
P.O. Box 180253 
Austin, TX 78718 
(512) 280-0319 
$29.95, 48K disk 

Genie is a unique new product for the 
Atari that allows you to temporarily 
suspend whatever you are doing and 
access four extra functions. When you 
are finished, the program returns you 
to exactly where you left off. The four 
functions are: Genie Note Pad, a 150 
line scratch pad for your sudden in- 
spirations; Genie Calculator, a five 
function decimal/hexadecimal calcu- 
lator with a memory; ATASCIl Table, a 
handy reference for those graphic 
characters you sometimes forget; and 
DOS Funaions, providing instant DOS 
access. Genie does not use up memory 
space, and it automatically saves the 
contents of the Calculator and the 
Notepad. 




COMP-U-TEMP 

(temperature sensor) 
Applied Technologies, Inc. 
Computer Products Division 
Lyndon Way 
Kittery, ME 03904 
(207) 439-5074 
«109.95, 48K disk 

A new breakthrough in low-cost data 
logging and temperature monitoring, 
this package gives your Atari a real- 
world interface. Compu-U-Temp com- 
bines the following features: labelling 



New Products notices are compiled by the 
Antic staff from information provided by 
the products' manufacturers. Antic wel- 
comes such submissions, but assumes no 
responsibility for the accuracy of these 
notices or the performance of the prod- 
ucts listed. 

of sensor locations, high temperature 
or low temperature alarm settings, 
hardcopy printouts, sampling of tem- 
perature at different time intervals and 
recording of temperature data to disk. 
Ideal for laboratories, greenhouses and 
school science projects. 

MINDWHEEL ■^■■■^■■H 

(software) 

Synapse & Broderbund 

17 Paul Drive 

San Rafael, CA 94903 

(415) 479-1170 

839.95, 48K, Two disk drives 

An ambitious and long-awaited series 
of interactive text adventure games 
called "Electronic Novels." You'll go 
into the heart of fictional worlds. 
Complex interaction is made possible 
by a sophisticated parser and random 
events. Instead of puzzles, you are 
presented with something much more 
like a story. Mindwheel is the first of 
the series to be released for the Atari. 
It is a journey into the minds of four 
people of extrordinary power, all 
linked to a common neuro-electronic 
matrix. The next novel will be Essex, 
an intei^alactic search-and-rescue 
mission. 



BASIC XE I 

(software) 

Optimized Systems Software 

1221B Kentwood Avenue 

San Jose, CA 95129 

(408) 446-3099 

879, 48K cartridge and disk 

BASIC XE is the first programming 
language designed especially for the 
128K memory of the new Atari 130XE 
computer But it will also work with 
XL models. Features a host of new 
commands and is upwardly compatible 
to BASIC XL and Atari BASIC. Claimed 



to be 2 to 6 times faster than Atari 
BASIC. Provides auto line numbering, 
renumbering, program cross referenc- 
ing, English error messages. 




COMPETITION PRO MODEL 
3000, 5000 & 200X ■IMI^H 

(joysticks) 

Competition Pro 

2609 Greenleaf Avenue 

Elk Grove, IL 60007 

(312) 228-1810 

S15.95, S17.95 & S8.95 respectively 

Three new models from one of the 
best-known joystick manufacturers. 
Each stick features a different control 
mechanism. The Model 5000, de- 
signed to bring "arcade feel" to the 
Atari, features a microswitch assembly 
for greater accuracy and higher scores. 
The Model 3000 "flight control 
joystick" (pictured) has both top and 
trigger fire buttons and uses 8-way 
leaf-switches for precise directional 
control. The 200X joystick uses a 
highly reliable spring switch mechan- 
ism and features a handle especially 
designed for comfort during long 
hours in front of the screen. All three 
come with an extra-long five foot cord 
and are covered by an unconditional 
two-year warranty. 

Return the favor. When you call a 
manufacturer or supplier about a 
product you 've seen advertised or other- 
wise mentioned in ANTIC, please tell 
them so. This will help us to continue to 
bring you the latest information about 
products that will make your Atari com- 
puter an even more valuable investment 
in the future. —ANTIC ED Q 



82 



ANTIC, The Atari Resource 




An the home computer races, the Atari 130XE stands out as a price leader. But using underpowered Atari 
BASIC"' on this otherwise fme machine is Hke racing in the Indy 500 with half your cylinders missing. 
So don't get left at the starting line with only half an "engine." Change to the performance leader now! Buy 
BASIC XE from OSS, the only programming language designed especially for the Atari 130XE. 

Just look at what you get for one low sticker price: 

CLASSIC DESIGN: Show off the sleek struc- 
tured style of your own programs when you use 
BASIC XE statements like PROCEDURE, 
IF.. .ELSE, and WHILE... END WHILE. 

FREE ACCESSORIES: Get over $100 worth of 
Atari BASIC options FREE when you buy BASIC 
XE: complete Player /Missile Graphics support, 
string arrays, DOS access, SORT commands, read- 
able listings... over 50 extras at no additional charge. 



BEST MILEAGE: With over 60,000 more bytes 
for your programs, BASIC XE lets you use all the 
memory you paid for.* 

MORE HORSEPOWER: Run Atari BASIC pro- 
grams 2 to 6 times faster.* Even with its incredible 
power, BASIC XE is compatible with Atari BASIC. 

BETTER HANDLING: With auto line number- 
ing, renumbering, program cross referencing, 
English error messages, and more. 



If you're ready to step up to real performance. . .YOU need BASIC XE now! 
If you haven't written your first BASIC program... YOU need BASIC XE now! 
If you're already a real pro in BASIC... YOU need BASIC XE now! 
BASIC XE may well be the best buy any Atari owner ever made. 




*Want to know more? Call or write for free brochure or ask your local dealer. 

Atari 130XE" and Atari BASIC" are U.S. registered trademarks of Atari Corporation. 



Optimized Systems Software, Inc. 

1221BKenlwoo<J Avenue. San Jose, Calilornia 95129 (408)446-3099 




AMERICA 



E BUILT IT FOR YOU 

THE ATARI 520ST 



"We promised. 
We delivered. 
With pride, 
determination, 
and good old 
ATARI know how. 
Sam Tramiel, 
President, 
ATARI CORP. 



No Other computer we know of 
has been awaited with such antici- 
pation, has received so much 
national and trade press, and has 
been so unanimously acclaimed — 
as the remarkable 520ST. 

And for good reason, its develop- 
ment represents a bold, new stan- 
dard in personal computing power. 
The 520ST simply obsoletes all current personal 
systems — even those costing thousands of dollars 
more. Beneath its full stroke 
94-key keyboard is an operating 
environment so intelligent that 
it puts you in command almost 
at once. It's that easy. 

Graphic symbols quickly 
identify available functions. 
Menus appear just by aiming 
the mouse. Point to a specific operation, 
click the mouse and instantly you are 
able to develop full color charts, recall 
files from within folders, and so much 
more. 

And when you combine 524,288 
bytes of RAM with ATARI'S custom 
circuits and the horsepower of a 68000 
microprocessor, you own a powerful 
computer that delivers crisp, high re- 
solution images with incredible speed. 





With a monochrome monitor 

your 520ST displays 640 x 400 

pixels of extremely high resolu- 
tion clarity. Select a color monitor 

and you are able to create beautiful 

graphs and diagrams from a pal- 
ette of 512 vivid colors. 

Power to grow. An array of 

expansion ports allow' you to easily customize your 

520ST. There are standard serial and parallel interface 

ports for connecting printers and 

telecommunications equipment, 

MIDI connectors to interface with 

music synthesizers and keyboards, 

and 3.5 inch floppy disk, cartridge 

and joystick ports. There is also a 

hard disk port with the lightning 

communications speed of 1.33 

Megabytes per second. ATARI 520ST systems are avail- 
able now. When it comes to 
state-of-the-art technology 
...don't settle for less. And 
when it comes to price 
...don't pay a penny more. 

For the dealer nearest you call 

408/745-2367. 

Or write to: 

ATARI Corp. 

Customer Service 

1196 Borregas Ave. 

Sunnyvale, CA 94086 



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ATARI' 




Power Withou 



SYSTEM INCLUDES: 520ST Personal Computer, 
Monochrome Monitor, Mouse Controller, 3.5 inch Disk Drive 
TOS™ - The Operating System Disk 
ATARI Logo™ Language Disk 
With full color monitor: $999.95"